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7

The main idea is to use left << shift and | to encode and & and right >> shift to decode. Suppose the values are organized as array: byte[] data = new byte[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 }; int result = data .Select((value, i) => value << (4 * i)) .Aggregate((x, y) => x | y); // or just .Sum() - Jeppe Stig Nielsen's idea ...


6

Bitwise operations return a value of type int (signed). Signed integers use two's-complement to represent negative numbers. Sign extension is used when going from byte to int. byte a = 1; // 0b00000001 int notA = ~a; // 0b11111110 = -128 + 64 + 32 + 16 + 8 + 4 + 2 = -2 (actually 0b11111111 11111111 11111111 11111110) byte b = 9; // 0b00001001 int notB = ~9;...


6

The code is not to determine if a particular character is present in all strings. It is to find the number of characters that are present in all strings. Here's the breakdown of the code. int n, a = 0xfffffff; cin >> n; n is the input parameter from the user which determines the number of strings. Let's say n is 3 while (n--) { ...


3

The is because 256>>(0*8) (equivalent to 256), is an untyped constant, which is too large to fit in a byte The rules in the language spec state A constant value x can be converted to type T in any of these cases: x is representable by a value of type T. x is a floating-point constant, T is a floating-point type, and x is representable ...


3

Although the shift does nothing it makes things easier to read, think of MBALIGN equ 1<<0 MEMINFO equ 1<<1 as saying MBALIGN equ BIT0 MEMINFO equ BIT1 etc.


3

It's a wide topic, but I'll try to roughly cover the basics in order to understand what goes on here. As we know, it's using 32-bit integer values which means you can operate on four bytes simultaneously using fewer CPU instructions and therefor in many cases can increase overall performance. Crash course A 32-bit value is often notated as hex like this: ...


2

Those lines are defining constants. In this case, those are flags that can be bitwise or'd together and tested individually. It's easier to see the structure of flags by defining them as shifts of 1. You would get the same effect by writing out the value of that expression, but it would be harder to see which bits mean what. (In this case, having bit 0 set ...


2

<< is a bit shift operator and it is like what it is in C for unsigned integers. 1<<0 shifts 1 by 0 bits, so the result is 1. << gives a bit-shift to the left, just as it does in C. So 5<<3 evaluates to 5 times 8, or 40. Using CPU instructions is required to do shift in runtime in assembly, but you can use expressions to be ...


2

You forgot that the leading bits are also inverted: 00001001 NOT 11110110 It looks like you want to mask those: byte b = 9; Console.WriteLine(~b & 0xf); // should output 6


2

Originally, the second argument to open was called mode and was documented as being 0, 1, or 2. Later on, the argument was renamed oflag, and it could now contain flags in addition to the access mode. The possible values for the mode were kept the same, though, and symbolic names were given for them, with the caution that, unlike flags, only one of O_RDONLY, ...


2

The Javadoc says the default initial capacity "MUST be a power of two". By writing the assignment as a left shift, it encourages future developers to ask themselves "why did they write it like that?" and thus read the comments, while also making it easier for the value to be changed to a different power of two.


2

There's not much going on in here, and breaking it down bit by bit reveals what it does: #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { // Initialize a bitmask, here assumed to be 32-bits // which is probably "enough" for this case. int n, a = 0xfffffff; // Read in the number of strings to process cin >> n; // Assume n >...


2

you cannot store the operator itself. instead let the user input the operator as text: e.g. and, or , .. and in your code use an if-statement to use the correct operator based on this user-text. Pseudocode: if ("and".equalsIgnoreCase(userInput) { dataRightTemp[i]=key[i] & dataRight[i]; } else if ("or".equalsIgnoreCase(userInput)) { ...


1

No, there no direct support in .Net for bit operations on byte arrays. You can convert to existing types like you show in the question implement operations on arrays yourself and use arrays consider if BigInteger works for your cases (supports all bitwise operation on arbitrary long numbers, but there sitll no direct way to write long constanst outside ...


1

Let's first take a look at int c = 0; for (char ch : s) c |= 1 << (ch - 'a'); You represent the characters of your input string bitwise by using the variable c: If character a occurs in the string, bit 0 in variable c is set to 1, If character b occurs in the string, bit 1 in variable c is set to 1, If character c occurs in the string, bit 2 ...


1

It is entirely unclear what you mean, so here's some MISRA code review: int is not MISRA compliant. Use a fixed-width integer type, preferably from stdint.h. 0x0f literals like these are not MISRA compliant. All literals need to have an u or U suffix, even hexadecimal ones. val |=0xf0; is not MISRA compliant. You aren't allowed to use bit-wise operators on ...


1

unsigned val = whatever(); val = (val | 0xF0u) & ~1u; The nested assignment is unnecessary. I don't have a MISRA copy handy, but I think this should pass. The use of unsigned literals and types is because MISRA disallows bitwise operations on signed integers.


1

You can use bitwise AND. It operates on 32 bit integers, but you can just "and" with 0xffff. function uint16 (n) { return n & 0xFFFF; } Additionally, bit shift operations (<<, >>>) also operate on 32 bit integers, so you only really need to call the uint16 function before assignment: for (var i = 0; i < s.length; i +=1 ) { n ^= ...


1

You can't necessarily get all the bits The logic table for an or gate is A B A+B 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 So if you know that A+B is 1 and B is 1, you cannot know what the value of A is.


1

Here is my guess: The capacity of a java HashMap is always supposed to be a power of two (for reasons beyond the scope of this question). Therefore the default initial capacity must be a power of two. While 16 is a power of two, 1 << 4 illustrates this restriction clearly to anyone who may want to modify the code.


1

Use int open_mode = (flags & O_ACCMODE); Then you can use checks like: (open_mode == O_RDONLY)


1

If you don't want to think about bitwise operations, you can set up a BitVector32, like this: var bv = new BitVector32(); var sections = new BitVector32.Section[8]; // Create 8 4-bit sections sections[0] = BitVector32.CreateSection(15); for (var i = 1; i < 8; ++i) { sections[i] = BitVector32.CreateSection(15, sections[i - 1]); } // Initialize the ...


1

Let j = k - 1, and let unset_bit be the lowest power of two such that (j & unset_bit) == 0. If (j | unset_bit) <= n, then we pick a = j and b = j | unset_bit for the optimal value of (a & b) == j. If (j | unset_bit) > n, then no possible choice of a and b will give us (a & b) == j. We simply don't have two numbers to pick with all the ...


1

I would do: uint64_t padd_input(uint64_t x, int nx) { uint64_t t = x & (1ULL << (nx-1)); t = t - 1; x = x | ~t; return x; } or perhaps uint64_t padd_input(uint64_t x, int nx) { uint64_t t = x & (1ULL << (nx-1)); if (t) { t = t - 1; x = x | ~t; } return x; } as it seems more clear ...


1

if(x & 1) // '&' is a bit-wise AND operator printf("%d is ODD\n", x); else printf("%d is EVEN\n", x); Examples: For 9: 9 -> 1 0 0 1 1 -> & 0 0 0 1 ------------------- result-> 0 0 0 1 So 9 AND 1 gives us 1, as the right most bit of every odd number is ...


1

You are missing the point of Swift's Option Set type. The idea is that you do not use bitwise "and" or "or". You can, but you don't, because they are error prone and confusing. Instead, you use set operations. var packagingOptions: PackagingOptions = [.Box] // it's a _set_ if somethingOrOther { packagingOptions.insert(.Satchel) // it's a _set_ } ...


1

You could use an ArrayBuffer with 2 different views. Write the bytes in using a Uint8Array and read out a value using a DataView specifying big-endianness like this: stringAsUInt32BE(binString) { var buffer = new ArrayBuffer(4); var uint8View = new Uint8Array(buffer); uint8View[0] = binString.charCodeAt(0); uint8View[1] = binString....


1

You can replace << x with * Math.pow(2, x). The main difference between these two statements is the behavior for very big or negative input x, e.g. bitwise operators turn their operands into two-complement numbers while the other arithmetic operators don't. // converts a four-character string into a big endian 32-bit unsigned integer function ...


1

You must shift mask instead of shift the variable #include <stdio.h> #include <limits.h> unsigned int a = 0xAA55AA55; int main() { size_t i; unsigned int n= sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT; unsigned int mask = 1 << (n-1); for (i=1; i<=n; ++i){ putchar(((a & mask)==0)?'0':'1'); mask>>=1; if(i%...


1

It looks like these functions should be available, they just aren't provided with the java/c syntax. Providing this would probably involve modifying the parser, although I'm not sure if this would conform to the SQL spec. https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/DRILL-923 If something you need is missing, developing functions in Drill is pretty ...



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