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0

On linux flavours use GCC to compile your program. http://www.wikihow.com/Compile-a-C-Program-Using-the-GNU-Compiler-(GCC) On windows you can try turbo-C or visual C++. I guess your program is not complete and I fear it would not run properly. Enjoy debugging and happy coding.


1

I highly recommend these resources: Representation of Numbers Binary Arithmetic Low Level Bit Hacks You Absolutely Must Know and absolute classic Bit Twiddling Hacks


0

Bitwise operators are used for bit manipulation, i.e. in cases when you want to go down to "gory details" of data structures that in the end of the day are sequences of bytes. There are a lot of tutorials that explain various usages of bitwise operators, however I will give you only one that (IMHO) is the most useful (at least for me). Sometimes you want ...


0

There's several places, though they aren't things that you will use often. You'll just end up using them when you need them. A good example is checking if a number is even: if (num & 1 == 0) {} They are also useful in flags, such as having this: private static final int ENABLE_FOO = 0x0001; private static final int ENABLE_BAR = 0x0002; static ...


1

Good example - bitwise XOR to swap two numbers (again, very popular in interviews) - fast swapping values without any third variable: int a = 2; // a = 0010 int b = 11; // b = 1011 a = a ^ b; // a = 0010 ^ 1011 = 1001 b = a ^ b; // b = 1001 ^ 1011 = 0010 (as a at the beginning) a = a ^ b; // a = 1001 ^ 0010 = 1011 (as b at the beginning) You can find ...


4

That is a matter of 32-bit vs 64-bit integers, because the result of the left shift << is of the same type as its operands. The Playground uses the 64-bit architecture, therefore 147 << 24 = 0x0000000000000093 << 24 = 0x0000000093000000 = 2466250752 On a 32-bit device, 147 is a 32-bit signed integer and therefore 147 << 24 = ...


3

Why doesn't b ^ 2147483648 return 2147483648 (but instead it's -2147483648) analogously to what happens with b ^ 8 and b ^ 16...? Because JavaScript's binary bitwise operators are (nearly all) defined in terms of signed 32-bit integer values. (The exception being >>>.) JavaScript's numbers are inherently IEEE-754 double-precision floating ...


1

The && operator in H2 is reserved for bounding box intersections test. This is why H2 try to load JTS Topology Suite library. For bitwise operations, you have to use the following H2 functions: http://www.h2database.com/html/functions.html#bitand http://www.h2database.com/html/functions.html#bitor ...


0

// if you are using string string str=Convert.ToString(number,2); str=str.PadLeft(32,'0'); //Rotate right str = str.PadLeft(33, str[str.Length - 1]); str= str.Remove(str.Length - 1); number=Convert.ToInt32(str,2); //Rotate left str = str.PadRight(33, str[0]); str= str.Remove(0,1); number=Convert.ToInt32(str,2);


1

Assuming your [Flags] enum has individual values that are single bits, something like this should do you: public static Foo SetBits( Foo foo , Foo bar ) { Foo value = foo | bar ; // throw if any bits are set that are not set in the enum itself. bool isValid = value == (AllBits&value) ; if ( !isValid ) throw new InvalidOperationException() ...


2

Try the following code #include <stdio.h> #include <limits.h> void find_binary( char ch ) { for ( int i = CHAR_BIT; i != 0; ) { int bit = ( 1 << --i & ch ) != 0; printf( "%d", bit ); } } int main( void ) { find_binary( 'A' ); return 0; }


6

The expression int bit = (1 << bit_index) & ch; produces a zero or a power of two with the corresponding bit set. To bring it into the 0..1 range, either shift ch right and mask with 1, or convert your expression as follows: int bit = ((1 << bit_index) & ch) != 0;


1

Having a static IntFlag field where you actually add these values is a good solution and as you realized we do have a Enum.IsDefined but just FYI, you can go the bit masking way as well. I threw up something together in LINQPad to give you an idea: BitVector32 is in System.Collections.Specialized [Flags] enum IntFlags { None = 0, A = 1 << 0, ...


5

There's no way to statically prohibit users of an Enum from creating an enum representing any value of the underlying type. You can only do such validation at runtime, as you showed in the question. If you're just looking for a simple enough way of validating, at runtime, if a particular enum value is a valid combination of flags, then that's a simple ...


2

If the modulus you are talking about is. b % (1u << a) Then you are in good shape because it's always by power of 2. This expression is equivalent to: b & ~(~0u << a) The shift should be pretty fast. If you're using a processor with no barrel shifter, it might be faster to use a lookup table: b & mask[a] Define mask as static ...


3

There is a problem, though: the modulus operator is not implemented on the architecture I'm aiming and is, thus, making the code slow. Is there any solution that doesn't use it? If this is the only modulo operator b % (1<<a) it can be replaced with b & ((1<<a)-1) pair f(int a, int b){ int k = (b >> a << (a+1)) + ...


0

The other answers have done a good job of covering the functional difference between the operators, but the answers could apply to just about every single C-derived language in existence today. The question is tagged with java, and so I will endeavor to answer specifically and technically for the Java language. & and | can be either Integer Bitwise ...


0

There are many use cases suggesting why should you go for || rather than | . Some use cases have to use | operator to check all the conditions. For example, if you want to check form validation and you want to show the user all the invalid fields with error texts rather than just a first invalid field. || operator would be, if(checkIfEmpty(nameField) ...


2

Firstly, you might notice that overflow is definitely not the problem. > 0x8000001 & 0x1 1 > 0x80001 & 0x1 1 > 0x801 & 0x1 1 as well. Now you should notice that the only bit flipped in both is in the 1s position. Try working out this simpler example in binary to see.


3

Well, 0x80000001 has binary representation 10000000 00000000 00000000 00000001 and 0x1 has binary repesentation 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000001 So 10000000 00000000 00000000 00000001 & 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000001 ------------------------------------- 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000001 Which is where you're getting 1 from. Hope ...


1

Since you're referencing the floor function 3 times, using an excessive number of loops for most operations (numbers less than 2^31 don't need all 31 loops), are using the ^ operator, and aren't capitalizing on the fact that a and b might be wildly different numbers with different magnitudes, you're losing a lot of efficiency. The function also isn't ...


0

You are misunderstanding your task. You are not supposed to clear the most significant bit anywhere. You have 14 bits. You are supposed to separate these 14 bits into two groups of seven bits. And since a byte has 8 bits, storing 7 bits into a byte will leave the most significant bit cleared. PS. Why on earth are you using an NSNumber? If this is ...


1

If I am understanding you correctly then I believe you are after something like this: u_int16_t number; number = 0xFFFF; number &= ~(1 << ((sizeof(number) * 8) - 1)); NSLog(@"%x", number); // Output will be 7fff How it works: sizeof(number) * 8 gives you the number of bits in the input number (eg. 16 for a u_int16_t) 1 << (number of bits ...


0

In C: x ^ y = (x & ~y) | (~x & y)


1

$ is not the and operator, & is. If you try: echo 65535 & 2048; you should get 2048 just fine, as I just did on http://sandbox.onlinephpfunctions.com/.


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When you try to run this: echo 65535 $ 2048; You will get this error: syntax error, unexpected '$', expecting ',' or ';' For my case code: echo 65535 & 2048; Giving output 2048 Note: You have typo there should be & inplace of $. because $ is not and operator but & is. DEMO


2

I assume you mean to shift by 16 bits, not 32, to get 0x12345678. Shifting by 32 will overflow in Java, and in most C/C++ implementations. That is guaranteed, and independent of endianness. Endianness determines how multi-byte values are stored in memory, not which bits are logically in which position within the value. Left-shifting by N bits is always ...


1

Endianness doesn't matter, although whether the machine uses one's complement or two's complement can. In C, << is unaffected because it is defined in terms of arithmetic operations (multiplication and exponentiation). In Java, << is unaffected because it is defined in terms of arithmetic operations (multiplication, exponentiation, addition, ...


8

The bitshift operations in all those languages operate on numbers. Endianness is not a property of numbers. In Java store is guaranteed to have the value 0x123400005678L, because 0x1234L << 32 is 0x123400000000L. In C and C++ store is not guaranteed to have any particular value: the result depends on the sizes of the types involved, and it has ...


3

Yes, they're equivalent when both operands are of type boolean or Boolean. This is a special case where the bitwise or, |, operator becomes equivalent to the logical or operator, ||. Here's a relevant part of the docs: JLS 15.22.2 To understand why, just think of booleans as one bit, 0 or 1.


2

Well to make the answer more complete, and despite what the others answered, in your case where a and b are boolean values the two are equivalent (not the same big difference) meaning they have the same result as: a || b and a | b are true is either one of them is true. But if your variables are not boolean then the equivalency is not true ...


3

No. It means a = a | b, where | is bitwise OR a || b is logical OR where a and b should evaluate to boolean Edit: If a and b are booleans, then a | b and a || b leads to same result


0

No it shouldn't be! you probabely want to use unsigned char for all your parameters unsigned char a = 60; unsigned char b = ~a; char c = ~a; printf("b=%d\nc=%d\n", b, c); gives the output : b=195 c=-61


8

You'd want bitwise, not logical or; and to preserve the value, you'd need to clear the bit in the new value before inserting the one from the old value: uint32_t const shift = 2; // number of bits to shift by uint32_t const mask = (1 << 1); // set of bits to preserve uint32_t bit_to_save = value & mask; value >>= shift; value &= ~mask; ...


0

int x;//whatever int penultimate_shift=(x&0x2)|((x>>2)&~0x2);


4

Use bitwise operations: (x>>2) & ~2 | (x&2) x>>2 shifts right by 2. & ~2 sets the penultimate bit to 0 | (x&2) 'grafts' in the penultimate bit from the original number.


1

<< and & appear in GLSL ES only as of version 3. You need to add an explicit request to compile as GLSL 3.00: #version 300 es You've then got a bunch of other problems coming. Unlike the desktop, the ESs aren't all that bothered about maintaining legacy features. So you'll need your varying to become an in/out and gl_FragColor no longer exists. ...


0

After: $scope.hex = parseInt($scope.r << 16 | $scope.g << 8 | $scope.b).toString(16); add the following lines: var len = $scope.hex.length; for ( var i = 0 ; i < 6 - len ; i++ ) { $scope.hex = '0' + $scope.hex; }


1

The 00 aren't directly trimmed. When your convert the rgb number to a string, you don't format it with leading zeros. Try this to format with leading zeros: var value = parseInt($scope.r << 16 | $scope.g << 8 | $scope.b); $scope.hex = ('000000' + value.toString(16)).slice(-6);


0

Turns out I was not creating the binary ranges properly to perform the search. I'm using .NET IPAddress and BitArrayfor AND/OR bitwise operations. To create the proper CIDR mask for the network portion, I had to reverse the order of bits for each byte when setting them with BitArray. The reason is the bit positions are stored as least-significant-first with ...


2

I understand that 0x0200 is equal to 0b1111 1110 0000 0000 No, it isn't. The correct value is given by, int i = 0x0200; // <-- decimal 512 System.out.println(Integer.toBinaryString(i)); Which outputs 1000000000 If we examine your second value, byte b1 = -5; System.out.println(Integer.toBinaryString(b1)); We get ...


4

But what is the significance of 0x0200 in the passage shown above? This is done for illustration purposes only: the value 0x200 ORs in a one in a position that is equal to 1 already. The idea is to show that the result is not 0x000002FB, but actually -5, i.e. 0xFFFFFFFB.



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