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49

Bitwise operators work on integers only. Infinity is a floating-point value, not an integer. The spec says that all operands of bitwise operations are converted to integers (using the ToInt32 operation) before performing the operation. The ToInt32 operation says: If number is NaN, +0, −0, +∞ or –∞ return +0.


21

Origins of the single vertical line "|" as indicating the disjunctive "or". From ASCII character history: It has been conjectured that the vertical line character was introduced to the area of computing with the Backus-Naur Form metalanguage for describing programming languages. It was also taken into use in APL in early 1960's and incorporated ...


16

No, there is no guarantee which order the functions will be called in. Unlike ||, | does not imply a sequence point. All functions in the expression must be called unless the implementation can determine that they have no side-effects and it can determine the result of the expression without actually calling one of the functions. The implementation can do ...


13

It will not short circuit. It may execute out of order. "The direction of evaluation does not affect the results of expressions that include more than one multiplication (*), addition (+), or binary-bitwise (& | ^) operator at the same level."


13

It's just doing the operation on the binary representations of your numbers. In your case, that appears to be two's complement. 17 -> 00010001 -15 -> 11110001 As you can see, the bitwise OR of those two numbers is still -15. In your comments above, you indicated that you tried this with the two's complement representations, but you must have done ...


13

Edit: Updated terminology for consistency with ECMA-334 (C# language specification). References (e.g. §14.10) are to specific sections of ECMA-334. Logical operators (|, &, ^) are not short-circuiting in C# (§14.10). This means all of the operands will be evaluated even if the final result of the expression is uniquely determined by a subset of the ...


9

Alright, I was somewhat embarrassed by how quickly I posted the wrong answer earlier, so I've spent a lot of time thinking about the problem. I wanted to come up with a solution that did not loop over the collection N times and I believe I've found a novel divide and conquer approach: int n0_, n1_, n2_, n3_, n4_, n5_, n6_, n7_; // Input data int n0 = 0; ...


8

It's a bitwise OR. This line: expr=1|2|3|4; is like: expr = b0001 | b0010 | b0011 | b0100; So: 0001 0010 0011 0100 ---- 0111 expr = b0111; expr = 7;


8

Especially the statement: expr=1|2|3|4; The | operator calculates the bitwise or of its operands: 1 = 00000001b 2 = 00000010b 3 = 00000011b 4 = 00000100b ------------- Result: 00000111b = 7 So, you will finally observe undefined behaviour, since you are accessing an array element which does not exist: expr=1|2|3|4; ...


8

The | is the bitwise OR operator. It works as follows: 0 | 0 == 0 0 | 1 == 1 1 | 0 == 1 1 | 1 == 1 Internally, an integer is represented as a sequence of bits. So if you have, for example: int x = 1 | 2; This would be equivalent to: int x = 0001 | 0010; int x = 0011; int x = 3; Note I am using only 4 bits for clarity, but an int in Java is ...


6

It does OR operations on negative numbers the same way it does so on positive numbers. The numbers are almost certainly represented in two's-complement form, which gives you these values: 17 = 0000000000010001 -15 = 1111111111110001 As you can see, all the bits of 17 are already set in −15, so the result of combining them is again −15.


6

SELECT MAX(@r:=@r|value) FROM `table`, (SELECT @r:=0) x Jim.H's suggestion is much better. Thanks! SELECT BIT_OR(value) FROM `table`


6

Since EmptyMask is defined as zero, the result is the same as passing the SPBasePermissions.ViewPages with no EmptyMask: [Flags] public enum SPBasePermissions { EmptyMask = 0×0000000000000000, ... }


6

You should't change from unsigned, but to it. Bitwise operations are always best performed on unsigned variables. Make v unsigned!


6

You can't get an unambiguous answer in the general case. If C=A|B, then wherever you have a 1 in C and a 1 in A, the corresponding bit of B could have been either 0 or 1. In your example, 93|199=223, but 92|199 is also 223. So given 223 and 199 there's no single answer.


5

If you want to perform bitwise operations, use bitwise operators. If you want to perform arithmetic operations, use arithmetic operators. It's true that for some values some arithmetic operations can be implemented as simple bitwise operations, but that's essentially an implementation detail to which you should never expose your readers. First and ...


5

That's not optimization - it's a fundamental property of the && and || operators, known as short-circuiting. The theory behind short-circuiting is that some values of the left operand mean we don't have to test the right operand. With &&, when the left side is false, the expression as a whole cannot possibly be true, so there is no point ...


4

Yes you can OR the control events flags together. I think you may be a little confused about how bitwise OR works. ORing does not increase the number of bits, it just increasse the number of set bits. When you see flags defined like this: UIControlEventTouchDragOutside = 1 << 3, UIControlEventTouchDragExit = 1 << 5, ...


4

Are they equivalent? Yes, as long as the bitfield being written to is clear beforehand. Otherwise, they'll go wrong in slightly different ways. Is one better than the other? No, although some would say that bitwise operations express the intent more clearly. So why would some programmers be inclined to use '+' instead of '|'? Because they're ...


4

The bitwise operator does not optimize because it is used when the entire width of the result is desired. In essence, it is defined to not be optimized. In contrast the OR operator is defined to determine if either operand is true. Another way to consider it is that the OR operator (||) is a Boolean operator, which is optimizable, while the bitwise ...


4

The type of an expression is generally determined by the expression itself, not by the context in which it appears. Your variable u is of type int64_t (incidentally, uint64_t would be better since you're performing bitwise operations). In this line: u |= 1 << i; since 1 is of type int, 1 << i is also of type int. If, as is typical, int is ...


4

A halfway decent compiler will tell you: warning: format ‘%d’ expects argument of type ‘int *’, but argument 2 has type ‘short int *’ scanf("%d", &curVal); You need to use %hd to scan a short, or (in this case better) change your variable to int. If you're using GCC, add -Wall -Wextra -Werror to your compilation command. It would have caught ...


4

In JavaScript, | and other bit operations except >>> execute ToInt32 before operate. So, 0x80000000 was converted to -2147483648. You can verify this by 0x80000000 | 0. If you want the result represented as a positive number. You can >>> 0 which will call ToUint32. (0x00000004 | 0x00000010 | 0x00000040 | 0x80000000) >>> 0 // ...


3

17 = b00010001 -15 = b11110001 <--- 2s complement | -15 = b11110001


3

This solution uses only bitwise operators : class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { int n0, n1, n2, n3, n4, n5, n6, n7; int n0_, n1_, n2_, n3_, n4_, n5_, n6_, n7_; // Input data n0 = 0; n1 = 64; n2 = 8; n3 = 8; n4 = 0; n5 = 12; n6 = 224; n7 = 0; ...


3

OR is not reversible. XOR is reversible.


3

A bitwise or with a negative number works JUST like a bitwise or with a positive number. The bits in one number are ored with the bits in the other number. How your processor represents negative numbers is a different matter. Most use something called "two's complement", which is essentially "invert the number and add 1". So, if we have, for simplicity, 8 ...


3

Why are you doing bitwise operations on a pointer? That's not a good idea, which is why you're getting compiler errors. You need to dereference the pointer with * to get a value that you can do these operations on: *byte |= 1; or *byte <<= 1; Note use of |= and <<= operators to make the code simpler, this is even more useful when working ...


3

You are applying an exclusive or (^). You're trying to apply a regular bitwise or (|). From the Python Wiki: x | y Does a "bitwise or". Each bit of the output is 0 if the corresponding bit of x AND of y is 0, otherwise it's 1. x ^ y Does a "bitwise exclusive or". Each bit of the output is the same as the corresponding bit in x if that ...


3

You missed an equals sign, meaning the last parenthesis assigns 3+xto b, evaluates to int rather than boolean and so can't be used for a logical OR expression. This works, though: boolean b = (y==3-x)||(y==3)||(y==3+x);



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