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50

In the context of computer science, a word is the concatenation of symbols. The used symbols are called the alphabet. For example, some words formed out of the alphabet {0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9} would be 1, 2, 12, 543, 1000, and 002. A language is then a subset of all possible words. For example, we might want to define a language that captures all elite MI6 ...


45

There is an Online Railroad Diagram Generator. It creates SVG syntax diagrams, also known as railroad diagrams, from context-free grammars specified in EBNF. You can copy the SVG code or take screen shots. You have to type in the grammar and it'll make the diagram. For example, to create the first railroad diagram you show, you would use the code: object ...


33

from Douglas Crockford to Aleem B date Tue, Apr 28, 2009 at 6:01 PM subject Re: Railroad Diagrams on json.org I drew them with Visio. Creative Docs.NET also works well. -- Aleem B wrote: Hello Douglas, I thoroughly enjoy most things you put out there and the railroad diagrams on json.org are no ...


31

First off, a bit of pedantry. You cannot determine whether a language is LL(1) from inspecting a grammar for it, you can only make statements about the grammar itself. It is perfectly possible to write non-LL(1) grammars for languages for which an LL(1) grammar exists. With that out of the way: You could write a parser for the grammar and have a program ...


15

From the C++ FAQ Lite: 38.11 Is there a yacc-able C++ grammar? The primary yacc grammar you'll want is from Ed Willink. Ed believes his grammar is fully compliant with the ISO/ANSI C++ standard, however he doesn't warrant it: "the grammar has not," he says, "been used in anger." You can get the grammar without action routines or the ...


14

you have to search on tools used to create grammars: "lex/yacc grammar", "antlr grammar" "railroad diagram" http://www.antlr3.org/grammar/list.html Here's some grammar files objective-c http://www.omnigroup.com/mailman/archive/macosx-dev/2001-March/022979.html ...


14

It is really simple. When you use ~, you have to understand that there's no backtracking on individual parsers which have completed succesfully. So, for instance, message got everything up to before the colon, as all of that is an acceptable pattern. Next, properties is a rep of property, which requires propertyName, but it only finds the colon (the first ...


14

The YACC syntax is in the Ruby source. Download it and run the bundled utiliy to get the readable syntax. wget ftp://ftp.ruby-lang.org/pub/ruby/2.0/ruby-2.0.0-p195.tar.gz tar xvzf ruby-2.0.0-p195.tar.gz cd ruby-2.0.0-p195 ruby sample/exyacc.rb < parse.y Output sample (total 918 lines for the v2.0.0-p195) program : top_compstmt ...


13

In answer to your main question: For a very simple grammar, it may be possible to determine whether it is LL(1) without constructing FIRST and FOLLOW sets, e.g. A → A + A | a is not LL(1), while A → a | b is. But when you get more complex than that, you'll need to do some analysis. A → B | a B → A + A This is not ...


13

Regular expressions accept strings from regular languages. Regular languages can also be accepted by an FSM. There's an potentially infinite number of brackets in your language that you have to match up. That means you need an infinite state, obviously impossible in any Finite State Machine. Therefore, your language isn't regular and can't be matched with ...


13

You can see one for Perl regexp (displayed a little more in detail here, as posted by edg)


13

Old-school assemblers were typically hand-coded in assembler and used adhoc parsing techniques to process assembly source lines to produce actual assembler code. When assembler syntax is simple (e.g. always OPCODE REG, OPERAND) this worked well enough. Modern machines have messy, nasty instruction sets with lots of instruction variations and operands, which ...


13

From the starting point of twitter's support the basic rules seems to be that hashtags must be preceded by a space and stop on any whitespace or punctuation. Quote from Twitter's support: Check your hashtags for the following: Is there any symbol in or after the hashtag? If you write #noican't, your message will be categorized under #noican. ...


12

Yes, there is one Ruby BNF syntax by the University of buffalo. Edit: I've also found this alternate Ruby BNF syntax.


12

Visual Basic 6.0 Language Reference


11

You have to think about EBNF and ABNF as extensions that helps you just to be more concise and expressive while developing your grammars. For example think about an optional non terminal symbol, in a BNF you would do it by using intermediate symbols like: A ::= OPTIONAL OTHER OPTIONAL ::= opt_part | epsilon while with a EBNF you can do it directly using ...


10

A BNF grammar might not be too useful in certain circumstances... Writing a LOGO that's accurately compatible with existing/historical implementation isn't an easy task (I worked on such a project). The problem is that the parser doesn't do the full job, and the evaluator (interpreter) has to work with partial data. Consider this example: proc1 a b proc2 c ...


9

You will have to tweak the BNF a bit, but TinyPG is a great tool.


8

Normally BNF grammars are too ambiguous. ANTLR will be probably good for what you are looking for.


8

I think this one is pretty accurate if you are looking for an ANTLR grammar: AS3.g This grammar has been originally developed a couple of years ago by Martin Schnable and then extended for the Meta-AS project. There are of course other ActionScript 3 parsers available as well, but they do not use ANTLR or another compiler-compiler. So this is probably your ...


8

No, this question doesn't actually have to do with regular expressions. Context-free grammars specify languages that can't be described by regular expressions. Here, A is a non-terminal; that is, it's a symbol that must be expanded by a production rule. Given that you only have one rule, it is also your start symbol - any production in this grammar must ...


7

One aspect, "is the language/grammar ambiguous", is a known undecidable question like the Post correspondence and halting problems.


7

A very common way would be: <block-statement> ::= '{' <statement-list> '}' ; <statement-list> ::= /* empty */ | <statement-list> <statement> ; <statement> ::= <whatever> ';' ; And then you define actual statements instead of typing <whatever>. It seems much cleaner to include trailing semicolons as part of ...


7

The Semantic bnf mode was for its own internal parser format. The original 'bnf' name was a pun that ended up confusing people. The existing Semantic modes such as wisent-grammar-mode and bovine-grammar-mode are for the grammars used by CEDET, and the original bnf-mode was similar, and did not represent a real BNF style grammar. You are probably more ...


7

I would recommend ANTLR as a parser generator. It's very feature complete and supports C# as well as a host of other target languages. For IDEs, there's a plugin for Eclipse called ANTLR IDE and a standalone IDE called ANTLRWorks, both of which work well. Note, however, that ANTLR uses an LL(*) algorithm instead of a LR(k) algorithm. Still, it's very ...


7

You could add a term constructor to wrap a predicate. Here, I also factored all of the literals into their own data type: data Term = TLit Literal | TVar String | TPred Predicate data Literal = LitS String | LitI Int | LitF Double data Predicate = Predicate String [Term]


7

A hyperlinked (purported) grammar is not necessarily one on which you can build a parser easily. That is determined by the nature of your parsing engine, and which real dialect of C and C++ you care about (ANSI? GNU? C99? C++11? MS?). Building a working C++ parser is really hard. See my answer to Why C++ cannot be parsed with a LR(1) parser? for some of ...


6

There are some links from w:BNF#Language Grammars. BNF Grammars for SQL-92, SQL-99 and SQL-2003 I also found a page that lists grammars for Objective C. Objective-C grammar for Lex/Yacc Flex/Bison Reference Manual for the Objective-C Language


6

Regular expressions cannot match nesting brackets.


6

Why not go straight to the source? The Erlang 4.7 specification lists productions in a grammar.



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