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4

Your first problem is with pList: sepBy1 is greedily grabbing trailing spaces, but once it does that it then expects an additional term to follow rather than the end of the list. The simplest way to fix this is to use sepEndBy1 instead. This will expose your next problem: pEndLine isn't faithfully implemented because you're always looking for exactly one ...


3

To post them on-site: CMPT 384 Lecture Notes Robert D. Cameron November 29 - December 1, 1999 BNF Grammar of Regular Expressions Following the precedence rules given previously, a BNF grammar for Perl-style regular expressions can be constructed as follows. <RE> ::= <union> | <simple-RE> <union> ::= <RE> "|" ...


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There is an open-source Marpa-powered XML parser.


2

Add this rule to your grammar: top_level : expression BITWISE_OR xor_expression | xor_expression BITWISE_XOR and_expression | and_expression BITWISE_AND shift_expression | shift_expression LEFT_SHIFT arith_expression | shift_expression RIGHT_SHIFT arith_expression | arith_expression PLUS term | ...


2

Your BNF version can not only produce multiple <C>s, but also multiple +s and -s (or zero, which would also be different from the original grammar). To fix these issues, you'll need to introduce additional non-terminals. Specifically you could have one that matches just {<A>} and one that matches [<C>]. Your definition of <S> could ...


2

This is shorthand syntactic sugar, EBNF to be precise, a syntax that transcends the standard features of regexen : It means prior character class without following character class, in this particular instance not certain brackets and quotes, and neither control codes from 0x00 (NUL) to 0x20 (SPC), which would otherwise be included. Pertinent reference: ...


2

There isn't a separate grammar that's published for the language, but you can get what you need from this. Internally, neo4j uses a package called Parboiled to do its parsing of cypher. In the cypher compiler software package, generally in /src/main/scala/org/neo4j/cypher/internal/compiler/v2_3/parser/ you'll find a file called Clauses.scala which ...


1

I have been looking also for the tools used to generate these Syntax Diagrams and if possible in js library so it can be edited and displayed without awaiting a boring time for a graphic to come. I know there are tools out there but I would say that the generator from bottlecaps.de has a nice graphic with color option. Unfortunately I could not get source ...


1

Use a special sequence for this: A special-sequence consists of a special-sequence-symbol followed by a (possibly empty) sequence of special- sequence-characters followed by a special-sequence- symbol. The sequence of symbols represented by a special-sequence is outside the scope of this International Standard. ...


1

The way you mention which you find unsatisfying is, in fact, the way it's usually accomplished. But you can produce an LALR(1) grammar which is precise. Here's a complete bison specification without conflicts: %token TYPE ID %% prog : | prog decl ';' decl : TYPE ID def_list block | TYPE ID def_list ';' | TYPE ...


1

Some characters are used for more than one operator. * is used for both the multiplication operator (which is a binary operator) and the address indirection operator (which is a unary operator). Thus, you can have an expression like x = a * *p; // multiply a by what p points to % and / do not have a similar use in unary expressions, which is why they ...


1

According to wikipedia a unary operation is an operation with only one operand.. So, the operators which needs or works on only one operand, are unary operators. % and / definitely needs two operands, so they are not unary operators. In case, you're wondering about the presence of + and -, they are unary positive and negative operators (unary ...


1

The SPARQL spec says that its grammar is written using the notation defined by the XML 1.1 specification. In that notation, the right-hand side you quote, '<' ([^<>"{}|^`\]-[#x00-#x20])* '>' denotes a sequence of a '<' character zero or more characters matching the expression [^<>"{}|^`]-[#x00-#x20]; this is a set difference ...


1

In order to write a recusrive descent parser, you need to convert your grammar into LL form, getting rid of left recursion. For the rules Term::= Term STAROP Primary | Primary you'll get something like: Term ::= Primary Term' Term' ::= epsilon | STAROP Primary Term' this then turns into a function something like: ParseTree *Term(istream *br) { ...


1

Without testing I suggest trying the following program: #lang pl #| BNF for the LE language: <LE> ::= <num> | <null> |# (define-type LE [Num Number] [Nul Null] [Kons LE LE]) (: test : LE -> LE) (define (test x) x) (test (Num 5)) ; this is accepted since 5 is a Number (test (Nul '()) (test (Kons (Num 1) ...


1

He was Danish: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Naur So, like the forvo.com recordings - kind of with a silent half 'r' at the end...


1

I am still wrapping my head around recursion, but it seems like there is a way to address this problem recursively? This is precisely how you are expected to approach this problem. Don't try to overthink the problem by analyzing what properties the strings in this language will have (e.g, length modulo 2, what characters it will contain, etc)! While ...


1

But, before it closes, here's what I'd have: mp := ( mp ) mp mp := '' Your second example, with n >= 0 and m >= 0 is not in BNF. Your first one should be acceptable however. Here's my derivation tree for ()(()()): mp ( mp ) mp ( '' ) mp ()( mp ) mp ()( mp ) '' ()(( mp ) mp ) ()(( '' ) mp ) ()(()( mp ) mp ) ()(()( mp ) '' ) ()(()( '' )) ()(()()) ...


1

I found J-algo tool. I think it is very easy to draw diagram but I can't export to image or another type. http://j-algo.binaervarianz.de/index.php


1

At least you have to include the words with an even number of characters, so: <palindrome> ::= a | b | aa | bb | a<palindrome>a | b<palindrome>b


1

I asked Nuance tech support 5 days ago and finally a couple of hours ago, here's what they answered: What you described (returning any spoken text) is dictation -- not grammar-based speech recognition. To perform dictation with Vocon Hybrid, you use the server-based or cloud-based service via the NMSP or HTTP interface. Please search for ...


1

The easiest way is to list each operator independently: { tokens=[ //... op_1='~' op_2='!' op_3='@' op_4='@@' op_5='#' //... ] } If you really want to accept all n + n^2 tokens, you will need to use a regular expression: { tokens=[ //... bin_op:'regexp:[~!@#]{1,2}' //... ] } But the idea is, you want to ...


1

You need to include the actual regular expression matching your identifier into the token definition. Something like: identifier ::= "regexp:v\w+"


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Yes, that is the result of a shift/reduce conflict. PLY warns you that you have two of these, and they are both somewhat related to the else clauses. However, the problem has nothing to do with the potentially infinite sequence of else if clauses. That is not a problem. The problem is more subtle and has to do with your use of empty productions. The most ...


1

The yecc documentation mentions only BNF and does not use EBNF in its examples, and as far as I can see there are no yecc source files in the OTP source tree that utilize EBNF, so I think it's safe to say that yecc supports BNF only.


1

Let's take x for example. <x1> -> 0 <x1> | 0 <x1>: 0^n, n > 0 <x> -> 0 <x> 1 | <x1> This means that x will be of the form: <x>: 0^m 0^n 1^m, n >= 1, m >= 0 since if there will always be a x1 in the middle of 0^m 1^m. If we simplify we will have <x>: 0^(m + n) 1^m, n >= 1, m >= ...


1

Your first derivation is correct, and 'aabccd' doesn't parse using this grammar. You'd need a third 'c' for it to be parse-able - so 'aabcccd' could be parsed, but not 'aabccd'. Best of luck.


1

Since your grammar is context-free, you can convert it to Chomsky Normal Form (CNF) and apply the CYK (Cooke-Young-Kasemi) algorithm to check whether the word is part of L(G), to have a guess-free, deterministic approach.


1

What you are looking for will be available in openCypher. Several items will be released as part of the project, one of the first of which is the BNF grammar. Update 2016-01-30: A first draft of the grammar is now avialable at https://github.com/opencypher/openCypher/blob/master/grammar.ebnf. Take a look at the recently announced (Oct 2015) openCypher ...


1

To answer your question, no, Extended Backus–Naur Form (EBNF) is not a programming language. It is a metasyntax notation. While a language is a way to describe an algorithm (what a computer should do), metasyntax is a way to describe a language.



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