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6

There is an inequality operator, a ~= b although it's rarely used as it is often better to just write a = b ifFalse: [ ...] That's not all however, and: accepts a block, not a boolean so contact password = contact confirmPassword and: firstTime = false should actually be contact password = contact confirmPassword and: [ firstTime = false ] if you ...


5

Pharo does have inequality: anObject ~= otherObject This is equivalent to (anObject = otherObject) not What Pharo does not have (along with any other Smalltalk or pure object language) is such thing as an "operator" (which is a mathematical function). In Pharo, both = and ~= are not operators but simple messages you send to an object. In this case ...


4

var myJson = null; try { myJson = data.body.region.store.customer.name; } catch(err) { //display error message }


3

Closest is the conditional operator: ? : eg: x ? b : a if x is 0 you get a if it's 1 (or anything else) you get b This operator works on entire values, like || && == and ! do. It does not operate on bits as ^ ~ & and | do. There is no direct equivalent for a multi-input mux. but you can fake one using an anonymous array, eg: ...


3

I have also not been able to reduce your expression to three literals. The Karnaugh map: BL 00 01 11 10 +---+---+---+---+ 00 | 0 | 1 | 1 | 1 | +---+---+---+---+ 01 | 0 | 1 | 1 | 0 | MN +---+---+---+---+ 11 | 0 | 1 | 1 | 0 | +---+---+---+---+ 10 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 1 | +---+---+---+---+ From looking ...


2

set your constants to powers of two and use or without bitshift. const EMAIL_CONFIRMED = 1<<0; //1 const EMAIL_UNSUBSCRIBED = 1<<1; //2 const NEXT_BIT1 = 1<<2; //4 const NEXT_BIT2 = 1<<3; //8 setBit: function (bit) { userBmask |= bit; } unsetBit: function (bit) { userBmask &= ~bit; //bitwise inverse }


2

Can set "Cronjob" in application and run after specific period of time. Please go through following link where you can find solution about how to set it with "whenever" gem. https://github.com/javan/whenever


2

A Majority Function with three inputs can be written as CNF (product of sums) (a or b) and (a or c) and (b or c) or as DNF (sum of products) ab or ac or bc Using AND and XOR, you can write maj(a,b,c) = ab xor bc xor ac A truth-table is probably the easiest way to check this. An XOR with three inputs is true, if either one input is true or ...


1

I think this will work. (A XOR 1) AND (B XOR 1)


1

If c=1. Then AB(CD+D+1) which is equal to AB. If c=0 Then AB(0+D+0) which is equal to AB*D. If d=1 Then AB(CD+1+C) wich is equal to AB. If d=0 Then AB(0+0+C) which is equal to AB*C. This means that having C or D is enough to have 1 so you can simply take off CD and end with AB(C+D). In every case: AB | A | B is equal to A|B because the latter is a ...


1

You have an error in your expansion; You are missing R. (p<->q) ^ (q<->r) Expanding the implications: ((p^~q) v (~p^q)) ^ ((q^~r) v (~q^r)) Distributing ((p^~q) v (~p^q))^ over the right side: ((p^~q) v (~p^q))^(q^~r) v ((p^~q) v (~p^q))^(~q^r) Distributing ^(q^~r) and ^(~q^r) over their respective left sides: (p^~q)^(q^~r) v ...


1

I'm afraid not. Each of the bit positions is an independent data stream. So long as you're restricted to these, no amount of bit-wise operation will make one bit affect any position other than its own. Even if you allow basic arithmetic, the appropriate operations -- multiply and divide by powers of 2 -- are slower and less obvious than the shift ...


1

For a start I don't like the way they teach binary simplification. To make things much easier for yourself take these rules instead of the ones they taught you: A AND B = AB A AND A = A A OR B = A + B - AB NOT A = 1 - A You can work out xor and etc.. yourself using these. Now then using these rules: NOT(NOT(A AND B AND C) AND (NOT (A AND B AND D))) = ...


1

Complete code, hopefully correct: public int Value { get { if ((_value < 32768)) { return _value; } else { return -32768 + (_value - 32768); } } set { _value = value; } } public bool B0 { get ...


1

I've only just stumbled across this whilst looking for something else so apologies if this has long since been solved. Here is an alternative way of looking at the problem\solution: ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[myProcedure] --Parameters for the stored procedure @myboolean as bit AS BEGIN SET NOCOUNT ON; SELECT field1 AS first_field, field2 AS ...


1

You read the input twice in such case: firstN = input.nextInt(); ... input.next (); Add some indication variable or reorganize the code so when you read via first read, avoid the second one.


1

I think I see where Serge is coming from, and I'll try to explain the difference. This is too long for a comment, so I'll post it as an answer. Serge seems to be approaching this from the perspective of questioning whether or not the implication applies. This is somewhat like a scientist trying to determine the relationship between two events. Consider the ...


1

The |, &, and ~ operators are bitwise operators. They work in parallel on individual bits in the operands. There is no corresponding bitwise operator for a multiplexer. The ternary operator: output = cond ? a : b comes close, but the selector operand is treated as a single bit, and not a vector of bits (that is, all output bits come from a or all ...


1

Please be advised that C operates at a much higher level of abstraction than logical gates, so making such comparisons might lead to confusions. That said, the closest you might come to a demultiplexer (I'll start with that since it's simpler) is the left shift operator: a << b This expression, assuming that a and b are int expressions, will produce ...


1

C has four bitwise operators: AND, &, as in a & b OR, |, as in a | b XOR, ^, as in a ^ b NOT, ~, as in ~a There is no MUX operator. Be careful about your phrasing. These are called bitwise operators, and are analogous to logic gates applied to all bits in an integral type. In C logical operators are different.


1

You can try following function test(obj, prop) { var parts = prop.split('.'); for(var i = 0, l = parts.length; i < l; i++) { var part = parts[i]; if(obj !== null && typeof obj === "object" && part in obj) { obj = obj[part]; } else { return false; } } return ...


1

What you need is to use a do-while loop: //assume user does not want to continue. boolean continue = false; do { //process whatever you want //ask the user Prompt= JOptonPane.showInputDialog(null,proString,HEADING,JOptionPane.QUESTION_MESSAGE); input = char.parseChar(Prompt); //wait until you get a valid input while(input != "y"||"n") { ...



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