Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

42

If you read the boost::any documentation they provide the source for the idea: http://www.two-sdg.demon.co.uk/curbralan/papers/ValuedConversions.pdf It's basic information hiding, an essential C++ skill to have. Learn it! Since the highest voted answer here is totally incorrect, and I have my doubts that people will actually go look at the source to ...


33

Have you looked at the comparison in the variant library already? (Not sure what states from external sources are, so it's kind of hard to say what's more appropriate for you.)


17

You could use boost::spirit::hold_any instead. It's defined here: #include <boost/spirit/home/support/detail/hold_any.hpp> and is fully compatible with boost::any. This class has two differences if compared to boost::any: it utilizes the small object optimization idiom and a couple of other optimization tricks, making spirit::hold_any smaller and ...


15

boost::any is not applicable to your problem. It performs the most basic form of type erasure: storage and (type-safe) retrieval, and that's it. As you've seen, no other operations can be performed. As jhasse points out, you could just test every type you want to support, but this is a maintenance nightmare. Better would be to expand upon the idea ...


12

The key difference between boost::any and boost::variant is that any can store any type, while variant can store only one of a set of enumerated types. The any type stores a void* pointer to the object, as well as a typeinfo object to remember the underlying type and enforce some degree of type safety. In boost::variant, it computes the maximum sized object, ...


9

If all your any objects can be set at the same time, you can just hard-code the type for the function pointer then and there. Stuff it all into a seperate object and you're good to go. This is basically a double-take on type-erasure, and could also be implemented through virtual functions (like how boost::any works internally), but I like this version more: ...


7

Using the pointer-form of any_cast is much cleaner, as it uses the nullability of pointers: for (const auto & elem : m) if (T1* p = any_cast<T1>(&elem)) { do stuff with *p; } else if (T2* p = any_cast<T2>(&elem)) { do stuff with *p; } else if (...) { ... } This also has ...


6

boost::any just snapshots the typeinfo while the templated constructor runs: it has a pointer to a non-templated base class that provides access to the typeinfo, and the constructor derived a type-specific class satisfying that interface. The same technique can actually be used to capture other common capabilities of a set of types (e.g. streaming, common ...


6

Upcasts (towards pointer-to-base) don't require an explicit cast in C++. On the other hand, boost::any_cast will only succeed when casting to the exact same type as was originally stored. (IIRC it uses typeid to check that you are trying to access the correct type, and typeid comparisons are only true for exact matches.) Hence: A* aa = ...


5

It is not possible at all, at least for arbitrary types. Note that maybe you could serialize using some tricky code (like finding the size of the elements contained in the any), but the any code relies on the compiler statically putting the any type_code and the proper types inside the placeholder. You surely cannot do that in deserialization in C++, as the ...


5

It's fine to add virtual functions to templates- just the functions themselves cannot be templates. A templated class or struct can still have virtual functions just fine. You need to use the magic of dynamic_cast. class Element { struct ValueStorageBase { virtual ~ValueStorageBase() {} }; template <typename Datatype> ...


5

Probably because it'd behave the exact same as any_cast, but it would be less descriptive. any_cast indicates that you're performing a cast, a type conversion. You're trying to get the value out of the any object. So it's clear to the user that the operation can fail if you call it with the wrong type. A get function is less clear about failure conditions. ...


5

If you want to stick with boost::any i am not sure but you can write your own "boost::any". I'm using this code for proxy methods to pass the parameters. #include <iostream> #include <boost\smart_ptr\scoped_ptr.hpp> #include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp> #include <boost/serialization/access.hpp> #include ...


5

boost::any includes a set of undocumented ValueType * unsafe_any_cast(any * operand) functions that do what you want for any* operands. You could take the address of your reference to get what you want, or since Boost is open source, you could patch in a set of these function templates to take an any& operand. Then just make a wrapper that uses the ...


5

From Boost.Any docs: template<typename ValueType> any & operator=(const ValueType & rhs); Makes a copy of rhs, discarding previous content, so that the new content of is equivalent in both type and value to rhs. So yes, it's safe to do that. A copy of the string is stored, not a reference to it.


5

You can create a function along the lines of: template <typename T> bool isInstanceOf( boost::any const& object ) { return boost::any_cast<T>( &object ) != nullptr; } and use it, with if's to check: if ( isInstanceOf<std::vector<int>>( elem ) ) { display( boost::any_cast<std::vector<int>>( elem ) ); } ...


4

string-literal is not a pointer, it's array of N const char, in your case, since boost::any constructor receive T (which is deduced to char[5], not to const char*, array-to-pointer conversion cannot work here), but you cannot initialize an array by another array in an initializer-list.


4

This is legal code, since any_cast returns const-pointer and any_cast, that receives pointer, does not change its argument. UB by standard can be only in 1 situation if you use const_cast: n3376 5.2.11/7 [ Note: Depending on the type of the object, a write operation through the pointer, lvalue or pointer to data member resulting from a const_cast ...


4

You can use boost::any_cast to get a pointer to the underlying type (provided you know it at compile time). boost::any any_i(5); int* pi = boost::any_cast<int>(&any_i); *pi = 6; void* vpi = pi;


4

I don't think it "violates" it - boost::any isn't designed for what you're using it. It is specifically designed to work with value types (see the docs, to which you already posted a link). You must any_cast to exactly the type the any variable holds; under the hood, it's checking the typeid. Clearly, const Base& isn't a match for Derived in this ...


4

I can't see any pitfalls as such (beyond being careful to specifically set it to nullptr_t and not any other pointer type); but why not just leave it empty, and check it with its empty() member function?


4

Extract it into a temporary variable and then cast that to the integer type that you want.


4

No. boost::any has no operator <<. You cannot use any in property_tree. anyVar.type() returns std::typeinfo, this class provides runtime information about type. template<typename Type, typename Translator> self_type & put(const path_type & path, const Type & value, Translator tr); Set the value of the node at the given path to ...


4

The answer is "no". Boost.PO is based on Boost.Any and this dependence can't be avoided by users currently. Boost.Any gives the main storage structure of Boost.PO so you can't compile some useful part of PO without Any.


4

You cannot directly provide it, but you can actually use any as the underlying type... though for pointers it's pointless (ah!) struct any { std::type_info const& _info; void* _address; }; And a templated constructor: template <typename T> any::any(T* t): _info(typeid(*t)), _address(dynamic_cast<void*>(t)) { } This is, ...


4

Boost.DynamicAny is a vairant on Boost.Any which provides more flexible dynamic casting of the underlying type. Whereas retreiving a value from Boost.Any requires that you know the exact type stored within the Any, Boost.DynamicAny allows you to dynamically cast to either a base or derived class of the held type. ...


4

else if(string s = boost::any_cast<string>(a)) This line is causing you problems. string s is not a pointer, it's a stack variable. You can't do a check for null. The reason you can do a check on the integer below is that integers implicitly map to bool. 0 -> FALSE 1 -> TRUE


4

This has nothing to do with any or map. Boost signals are simply non-copyable. You can wrap them in a smart pointer such as shared_ptr if you want something that's copyable and cleans up after itself.


4

The other way is to store an A* in the boost::any and then dynamic_cast the output. Something like: int main() { boost::any a = (A*)new A; boost::any b = (A*)new B; A *anObj = boost::any_cast<A*>(a); B *anotherObj = dynamic_cast<B*>(anObj); // <- this is NULL anObj = boost::any_cast<A*>(b); anotherObj = ...


3

Unfortunately, I think the only way to do it is this: static_cast<A*>(boost::any_cast<B*>(a))



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible