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85

boost::function allows anything with an operator() with the right signature to be bound as the parameter, and the result of your bind can be called with a parameter int, so it can be bound to function<void(int)>. This is how it works (this description applies alike for std::function): boost::bind(&klass::member, instance, 0, _1) returns an object ...


70

Use the following instead: boost::function<void (int)> f2( boost::bind( &myclass::fun2, this, _1 ) ); This forwards the first parameter passed to the function object to the function using place-holders - you have to tell Boost.Bind how to handle the parameters. With your expression it would try to interpret it as a member function taking no ...


65

boost::bind has overloaded relational operators, std::bind does not. boost::bind supports non-default calling conventions, std::bind is not guaranteed to (standard library implementations may offer this as an extension). boost::bind provides a direct mechanism to allow one to prevent eager evaluation of nested bind expressions, std::bind does not. (That ...


30

The boost documentation for bind suggests that you can use boost::ref and boost::cref for this.


29

The biggest "gotcha" I've run into is that it's illegal to call shared_from_this from the constructor. This follows directly from the rule that a shared_ptr to the object must exist before you can call shared_from_this.


26

The boost::asio::io_service::run() member function is overloaded: one version takes no argument while another version takes one argument. That is, taking the address of the of boost::asio::io_service::run requires a context in which the compiler can directly deduce the signature of the function. However, std::bind() isn't required to do deduction magic while ...


23

You need to add a placeholder for the int that you're passing to f2(). If you replace that definition with: boost::function<void (int)> f2( boost::bind( &myclass::fun2, this, _1 ) ); then it will compile.


21

I like this piece of the bind source: template<class R, class F, class L> class bind_t { public: typedef bind_t this_type; bind_t(F f, L const & l): f_(f), l_(l) {} #define BOOST_BIND_RETURN return #include <boost/bind/bind_template.hpp> #undef BOOST_BIND_RETURN }; Tells you almost all you need to know, really. The ...


17

You were really, really close: void calc(int x) { std::for_each(v.begin(), v.end(), boost::bind(&foo::func2, this, _1, x)); } EDIT: oops, so was I. heh. Although, on reflection, there is nothing really wrong with your first working example. You should really favour free functions over member functions where possible - you can see the ...


16

You can just use boost::function. I think boost::bind does have its own return type, but that is compatible with boost::function. Typical use is to make a typedef for the function: typedef boost::function<bool(std::string)> MyTestFunction; and then you can pass any compatible function with boost::bind: bool SomeFunction(int i, std::string s) { ...


16

Function pointers don't need it, member function pointers do. Device::asyncUpdate is member function, as you could guess because it is being bound to this. Here's a normative quote from n3337, 5.3.1/4 A pointer to member is only formed when an explicit & is used and its operand is a qualified-id not enclosed in parentheses.


15

You could use boost::indirect_iterator: std::for_each( boost::make_indirect_iterator(elements.begin()), boost::make_indirect_iterator(elements.end()), boost::bind( &MyClass::ReferenceFn, boost::ref(*this), _1 ) ); That will dereference the adapted iterator twice in its operator*.


15

I don't think so, only because boost::bind in this case is looking for a function pointer, not a function template. When you pass in FCall2Templ<int, int>, the compiler instantiates the function and it is passed as a function pointer. However, you can do the following using a functor struct FCall3Templ { template<typename ARG1, typename ...


14

You should be able to bind to a message implementation (IMP), which are just plain C functions with two hidden parameters, self and _cmd of types id and SEL respectively. EDIT: Just tested the following complete example, and it appears to work. #include <stdio.h> #include <boost/bind.hpp> #include <Foundation/NSObject.h> @interface ...


14

From my understanding, sometimes in your code you want a class to offer up shared_ptr's to itself so that other parts of your code can obtain shared_ptr's to an object of your class after it has been constructed. The problem is that if your class just has a shared_ptr<> to itself as a member variable, it will never get automatically destructed, since ...


14

The short answer is: you don't need to know (implementation defined). It is a bind expression (std::tr1::is_bind_expression<T>::value yields true for the actual type). Look at std::tr1::function<> BOOST_AUTO() c++0x 'auto' keywords (Type Inference) it's close cousing decltype() can help you move further 1. std::tr1::function<int> ...


13

You can try including cmath instead, and using static_cast<double(*)(double)>(std::log) (cast necessary to resolve to the double overload). Otherwise, you will limit your function to extern C functions. This would work like extern "C" typedef double (*ExtCFuncPtr)(double); double foo(double num, ExtCFuncPtr func) { return 65.4; } Another way is ...


13

boost::bind overloads the operator ! and the relational and logical operators ==, !=, <, <=, >, >=, &&, ||, so this is why you "see" a boolean expression, but you're really getting back a function predicate. From there you can see that you're binding the second member of the pair for the 1st and 2nd arguments of the overloaded less than ...


13

boost::bind(&player::play, &thePlayer) You need to use placeholders for the two arguments: boost::bind(&player::play, &thePlayer, _1, _2) The placeholders allow you to say "I'm only binding certain arguments; other arguments will be provided later."


13

Besides the listed above, boost::bind has an important extension point: get_pointer() function that allows integrating boost::bind with any smart pointer, eg. ATL::CComPtr etc. http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_49_0/libs/bind/mem_fn.html#get_pointer As a result, with boost::bind you can also bind a weak_ptr: ...


13

Besides the several differences cited on the other answers, here are two other differences: boost::bind seems to deal with overloaded function names in some situations, whereas std::bind does not deal with them in the same way. See c++11 faq (using gcc 4.7.2, boost lib version 1_54) void foo(){} void foo(int i){} auto badstd1 = std::bind(foo); ...


12

Yes, this is safe and portable – as mentioned explicitly in the documentation, the bind-expression returned by boost::bind silently ignores extra arguments. I.e., in your first example, func does not receive the values 1, 2, and 3 – boundFunc receives the values 1, 2, and 3 and forwards them to the contained bind-expression, which safely ...


11

A::OutOfRange is a function of 4 arguments - implicit *this being the first argument, which is missing in your bind clause


11

Another option is to use promises/futures. class Worker{ public: void Do( boost::promise<int> & p){ int ret = 100; // do stuff p.set_value(ret); } }; //Later... boost::promise<int> p; boost::thread t( boost::bind(&Worker::Do, &worker, boost::ref(p)); int retval = p.get_future().get(); //This will block until the ...


10

The callback should be stored as a boost::function<void, std::string>. Then you can use boost::bind to "convert" any other function signature to such an object, by binding the other parameters. Example I've not tried to compile this, but it should show the general idea anyways void DoLongOperation(boost::function<void, const std::string&> ...


10

By value. 1 But you can make it copy by ref instead: void SomeFunction(const int& value) { boost::bind(..., boost::ref(value)); boost::bind(..., boost::cref(value)); // by const ref } 1 http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_46_1/libs/bind/bind.html#Purpose a copy of the value of i is stored into the function object. boost::ref and boost::cref ...


9

When you call a virtual method via a reference or a pointer you will always activate the virtual call mechanism that finds the most derived type. Your best bet is to add an alternative function that is not virtual.


9

by default it's 9. http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_45_0/libs/bind/bind.html#NumberOfArguments


9

boost::lambda provides function wrappers for new and delete. These can be used to easily convert an new call into a function object.


9

Use boost::function: class Whatever { public: Whatever() { functor = boost::bind( &chat_session::handle_read_header, shared_from_this(), boost::asio::placeholders::error, boost::asio::placeholders::bytes_transferred ); boost::asio::async_read( socket_, ...



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