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15

I haven't used GIL yet, but I want to learn it as well. Having looked at the design guide and having googled up the error related to libpng, looks like the simplest example is #define png_infopp_NULL (png_infopp)NULL #define int_p_NULL (int*)NULL #include <boost/gil/gil_all.hpp> #include <boost/gil/extension/io/png_dynamic_io.hpp> using ...


8

the jpeg library is missing perhaps? sudo apt-get install libjpeg-dev ^that solved my problem


7

Sorry guys, I just realized immediately after posting that I've been working with matlab for way too long... I wrote the array in column major form... Ugh I feel stupid


7

There doesn't seem to be anything to facilitate this in boost itself. All I/O seems to be based on supplying filenames. However, there seems to be an extension here called io_new that has streams based I/O. See documentation here for an example (search for "Reading And Writing In-Memory Buffers").


7

Found the problem // read cmyk image file cmyk8_image_t img; jpeg_read_image( "1502-T2-C-PER.jpg", img ); //// convert to rgb rgb8_image_t rgb( img.dimensions() ); copy_pixels( color_converted_view<rgb8_pixel_t>(view(img)), view(rgb)); The trick is to use rgb8_pixel_twhen calling color_converted_view


5

You want to use boost::gil::copy_and_convert_pixels with a suitable matching color_convert specialisation in scope. Here's a complete example: #include <boost/gil/gil_all.hpp> #include <cassert> namespace boost { namespace gil { // Define a color conversion rule NB in the boost::gil namespace template <> void ...


4

Take a look at the new version of gil io from here: http://code.google.com/p/gil-contributions/source/browse/trunk/gil_2.zip This is not officially part of boost yet, but it works well and is stable, and it supports what you need. You don't say what format you are trying to read, but to read jpeg you would have code like this: using namespace boost::gil; ...


4

Have you tried using the family of functions png_read_and_convert_* For example: boost::gil::rgb8_image_t input; boost::gil::png_read_and_convert_image(ipath, input); You will lose the original type of the image this way, but if you want a fixed type for your code to manipulate this might be a good way to go.


3

GIL itself is very much concerned with storage of images and pixels in various formats and converting between them... but no more than that. user1929959's answer is using a GIL extension which facilitates interoperability of GIL with OpenCV and then uses OpenCV's line drawing (but OpenCV doesn't come with boost so you'd need to add that into your project ...


3

I think in such a case, I'd have the algorithm allow you to pass (a reference or pointer to) a structure for the scratch space, and give that argument a default value. This way the user can call the function without passing a structure when/if the extra time to allocate the structure isn't a problem, but can pass one if (for example) building a processing ...


3

Yes, you can do all that in boost::gil. What you should know though, is that boost::gil is only a universal interface and doesn't handle reading/writing images all by itself. You still need to use a second library, e.g. libpng..


3

Yes, yes and yes. There are functions that enable you to read and write JPEG, TIFF and PNG images: see here. For the second bullet, it is what just GIL is meant to do. You can manipulate images using its facilities (click here).


3

Alternative to the introducing any_image runtime stuff is using *_read_and_convert_image functions family (png_read_and_convert_image for your case)


3

You can make a list of types you want to try and use an any_image to hold a type-erased result: typedef mpl::vector<rgb8_image_t, rgb16_image_t> my_img_types; any_image<my_img_types> runtime_image; png_read_image("input.png", runtime_image); Source


3

it sounds like you solved your problem in the meantime, but just for the record... here are some pointers to information about your problem: First of all you may have missed the second constructor of boost::gil::image, which offers explicit access to the horizontal and vertical dimensions without the need of the point_t: image(x_coord_t width, y_coord_t ...


2

I have used GIL successfully with JPEG. I assume that you have downloaded and included the boost::gil headers. The jpeg library is NOT included in the boost library. The simplest thing is to include and link to one of the many copies of the jpeg library that are distributed. I use the one with wxWidgets ( wxWidgets-2.8.10\src\jpeg ). If you search your ...


2

After some computation based on your answer, I found out that 360*4 is dividable by anything up to 32, whereas 360*4+8*4 is even dividable by 64. So I guess the reason for the error is that GIL in your case tries to align image rows at 64 byte boundaries and therefore doesn't store them contiguously. Because of this it is always advised to use the generic ...


2

I would just push_back each color of the rgb8_pixel_t individually: struct PixelInserter{ std::vector<uint8_t>* storage; PixelInserter(std::vector<uint8_t>* s) : storage(s) {} void operator()(boost::gil::rgb8_pixel_t p) const { storage->push_back(boost::gil::at_c<0>(p)); ...


2

I found out the way to do it. I used gilView.row_begin(0)


2

See the new version of gil here: gil stable version It works well and it is stable. using namespace boost::gil; image_read_settings<jpeg_tag> readSettings; rgb8_image_t newImage; read_image(stream, newImage, readSettings); You code seems correct.


2

According to the docs the algorithm uses an auxiliary data structure called skip_table. By default (when the value_type of the iterator is not a char or unsigned char) this table uses a tr1::unordered_map, and this requires that gil::pixel be hash-able. So you have two options: you either change the default skip_table by specializing BM_traits for your ...


1

As you mentioned, this question can really be thought of as going far beyond images in scratch space. I've actually come across this in many different forms (memory sections, typed arrays, threads, network connections, ...). So what I ended up doing was to write myself a generic "BufferPool". It's a class which manages any form of buffer object, be it a ...


1

The design your initial question presents using resize() is not efficient, since the resize may require not just allocation, but will also copy existing content from the old allocation to the new. It will also require allocating and filling the new space before deallocating the old, increasing the maximum peak memory usage. It's preferable to provide some ...


1

If you use a function object, you can carry whatever state you need. Two useful algorithms are transform and accumulate. transform can take a function object to perform the transformation on each object in the sequence: class TransformerWithScratchSpace { public: Target operator()(const Source& source); }; vector<Source> sources; ...


1

See a solution here: http://boost.2283326.n4.nabble.com/gil-io-new-review-Reading-images-from-in-memory-sources-td3073639.html cheers


1

This might be due to your relative path. As far as I remember, Visual starts the debugging session in $PROJECT_DIR. If you launch manually the exe (from $PROJECT_DIR/Debug (or Release)), it might not find your resources.


1

template<class Dest, class Src> Dest gil_safe_ptr_cast(Src src) { // this cast is unsafe, use reinterpret_cast BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(false); } template<> boost::gil::gray8_ptr_t gil_safe_ptr_cast(boost::gil::bits8* pBits8) { return reinterpret_cast<boost::gil::gray8_ptr_t>(pBits8); } boost::gil::bits8* pBits8 = data8; ...


1

To convert from bits8* to gray8_ptr_t, create a struct pixel and provide the bits8 to the constructor: gray8_ptr_t convert_gray8_ptr_t(bits8* src) { return new struct pixel<bits8,gray_layout_t>(*src); } To convert back, use the struct's conversion operator: bits8* convert_bits8(gray8_ptr_t src) { bits8* result = new bits8; *result = ...


1

The according to the documentation the read/convert functions only accept filenames as input, not general streams or pointers, so this seems to not be possible. Grep on the header files seems to agree too: /usr/include/boost/gil > grep -nri stream * /usr/include/boost/gil > and searches for void * or char * don't return any relevant results either. ...


1

Boost is a widely accepted set of libraries, but it's not in the C++ standard. So don't feel that you've violated the ANSI/ISO code of conduct by using something that better suits your needs.



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