Hot answers tagged

13

I suspect it's just not reading your user-config.jam... When the build refers to, and searches for, the user-config.jam it does so in the %HOME% location. Not in the root directory of the Boost sources, nor in the current dir. But you can make it use a specific user-config.jam file with an option: bjam --user-config=user-config.jam .... Which will look for ...


10

Ok, I think I have the answer, which requires some knowledge of the underlying C-style MPI calls. Boost's 'isend' function is essentially a wrapper around 'MPI_Isend', and it does not protect the user from needing to know some of the details about how 'MPI_Isend' works. One parameter of 'MPI_Isend' is a pointer to a buffer that contains the information you ...


9

As a starting point I'd suggest OpenMP. With this you can very simply do three basic types of parallelism: loops, sections, and tasks. Parallel loops These allow you to split loop iterations over multiple threads. For instance: #pragma omp parallel for for (int i=0; i<N; i++) {...} If you were using two threads, then the first thread would perform ...


8

Under the hood OpenMP is multi-threaded programming but at a higher level of abstraction than TBB and its ilk. The choice between the two, for parallel programming on a multi-core computer, is approximately the same as the choice between any higher and lower level software within the same domain: there is a trade off between expressivity and ...


5

I think it's safe to say that there are no widely-used de jure or de facto standard diagrams and diagram types in use for what you want. I tend, when I have to, to use MS Visio. On Linux I'd look first at GraphViz and, perhaps, PGF & TiKZ. As for how to draw diagrams, I'd generally start with the nearest approximation I could find in one of the ...


5

The answer turned out to be simple: open mpi authenticated via ssh and then opened up tcp/ip sockets between the nodes. The firewalls on the compute nodes were set up to only accept ssh connections from each other, not arbitrary connections. So, after updating iptables, hello world runs like a champ across all of the nodes. Edit: It should be pointed out ...


5

Each library solves different problems, they don't really overlap. It also depends what you are trying to solve, and the communication patterns of your application. Use Boost.MPI for scalability, such as scaling to thousands, or tens of thousands of nodes. Depending on the underlying network architecture, MPI also excels at collective operations: gather, ...


5

Rank 1 doesn't have a valid req0, and rank 0 doesn't have a valid req1; they are requests which are only valid on the tasks that actually performed the nonblocking operation (and returned a handle to a request). So no, neither rank here needs to (or even could) call wait on both requests; each calls a wait on the request that it has, eg ...


5

MPI has two types of collective operations - ones that have a designated "root" process and others that have not. Operations with designated root are broadcast (root process sends the same data to all processes), scatters (root process scatters its data to all processes), gathers (root process collects data from all processes) and reductions (root process ...


4

I think I have stumbled upon a similar problem today. When serializing a custom datatype I noticed it was (sometimes) corrupted on the other side. The fix was to store the mpi::request return value of isend. If you look at communicator::isend_impl(int dest, int tag, const T& value, mpl::false_) in communicator.hpp of boost, you'll see that the serialized ...


4

You should use std::logical_or. The tutorial page has tables of operations from C MPI to their corresponding operations in Boost.MPI.


3

Boost might not be installed in a location that the module FindBoost searches. You can specify the prefix where Boost was installed by setting the variable BOOST_ROOT to your Boost installation prefix. To your code I would add: CMAKE_MINIMUM_REQUIRED(VERSION 2.6) PROJECT(mpi-tests CXX) set( BOOST_ROOT "/path/to/boost/install/prefix" ) FIND_PACKAGE(Boost ...


3

Assuming you are using g++ you can try using the -Wl,--rpath linker option. mpiCC testboostmpi2.cpp -I/home1/username/boost/include-I/usr/mpi/gcc/openmpi-1.2.8/include/ \ -L/home1/username/boost/lib -L/usr/mpi/gcc/openmpi-1.2.8/lib64/openmpi \ -lboost_mpi-gcc-mt-1_35 -Wl,-rpath -Wl,/home1/username/boost/lib \ -Wl,-rpath ...


3

I haven't used both of them, but Boost.ASIO is more an abstraction layer for networking on a low level, whereas Boost.MPI implements the MPI standard which let's you create distributed computing systems. So if you need some, say, socket-like communication, I'd go with ASIO. If you want to do distributed computing and maybe even interoperate with MPI ...


3

The limit of the message size is the same as for MPI_Send: INT_MAX. The issue is that you are not waiting for the isend to finish before resizing the vector a in the next iteration. This means that isend will read invalid data due to the reallocations in the vector a. Note that buffer a is passed by reference to boost::mpi and you are thus not allowed to ...


2

Depends on your focus. If you are mainly interested in multi threaded programming go with TBB. If you are more interested in process level concurrency then MPI is the way to go.


2

I'd suggest you to play with MapReduce for sometime. You can install several virtual machines instances on the same machine, each of which runs a Hadoop instance (Hadoop is a Yahoo! open source implementation of MapReduce). There are a lot of tutorials online for setting up Hadoop. btw, MPI and OpenMP are not the same thing. OpenMP is for shared memory ...


2

My first recommendation would be to simplify: can you build the standard MPI 'hello, world' example? can you run it several times on localhost? can you execute on the other host via ssh is the path identical and if so, then mpirun -H host1,host2,host3 -n 12 ./helloworld should travel across. Once you have these basics sorted out, try the Boost ...


2

Unfortunately, I'm using boost 1.41, so an exact comparison is impossible. However, I got the exact same errors when I did not include -lboost_mpi (the new library naming convention). So, I'd check that your directories are correct and contain what you think they should contain.


2

MPICH2 uses "mpicxx" as its C++ compiler wrapper name.


2

Your compiler has optimized the crap out of your "solutions[sol] = new Solution;" loop and concluded that it can jump to the end of all the num_solution++ increments. It is of course wrong to do so, but that's what's happened. It's possible, though very unlikely, that an automatically threading or automatically parallelizing compiler has cause the 20 ...


2

The troubles was caused by a missing : in the using-statment. Boost.MPI compiled fine after correcting this to using mpi : : <find-shared-library>impi ; (notice that there are two ':').


2

It is not possible to serialize two different versions of the same type in the same binary module. The reason is that the version used is a compile time constant specified using the BOOST_CLASS_VERSION construct (the version number defaults to zero if not specified). What you could try is to implement specializations of the serialization member function for ...


2

What is your distribution or OS? My Debian / Ubuntu systems have it as a softlink to mpic++.openmpi (which comes from the libopenmpi-dev package). So I use Open MPI; the MPICH2 packages provide the same softlink.


2

I don't like global pointers in general: who's responsible for deleting them? How do you make sure the pointer is not accessed before the object is created, or after the object is destroyed? I'd be tempted to wrap the pointer and its access in a class. (Warning: The following hasn't seen a compiler so might have all sorts of issues, and I'm not familiar ...


2

Well, this is embarrassing. I'm going to leave the question up in case anybody else has the same strange errors. The problem with my code was actually in the makefile. I forgot to link to the boost library for MPI. incorrect makefile flags: -I$(BOOST_INCLUDE) -lboost_serialization -lboost_mpi Apparently that line contains just enough information ...


2

Have a look in: boost/mpi/collectives/gather.hpp You'll see different implementations of gather_impl, one with "out" values in the argument list and one without. The one without "out" values sends its data to the root process. So in the gather example: gather(world, my_number, 0) implements an mpi send and gather(world, my_number, all_numbers, 0) ...


2

From the boost.MPI documentation: MPI_ANY_SOURCE becomes any_source MPI_ANY_TAG becomes any_tag The communicator::recv() method returns an instance of the status class that provides all the information that you need: status.MPI_SOURCE is returned by status::source() status.MPI_TAG is returned by status::tag() It also provides two cast operators to ...


2

Consider to use the parameter --mca btl_tcp_if_include eth0 to make nodes use only eth0 interface and preventing OpenMPI to figure out which was the best network. There is also --mca btl_tcp_if_exclude eth0 Remember to subtitute eth0 for your particular interface. My /etc/hosts contained lines like these: 10.1.2.13 node13 ... 10.1.3.13 node13-ib When ...


2

An MPI_BCAST is usually implemented in some sort of tree fashion where processes at the top of the tree can exit the algorithm after they've finished their part of the broadcast. So if rank 0 sends messages to ranks 1 and n/2, then it can leave after those messages are done. So the answer to your question is: no, that's not an accurate measurement. Without ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible