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26

On my machine using g++ -O3 -march=native -mtune=native --fast-math -DNDEBUG test.cpp -o test && ./test I get [Boost] Elapsed time: 0.020 seconds [Native]Elapsed time: 0.020 seconds However changing const int ITERATIONS to 5000 I get [Boost] Elapsed time: 0.240 seconds [Native]Elapsed time: 0.180 seconds then with ITERATIONS back to 500 ...


10

Your test is flawed. In a DEBUG build, boost::MultiArray lacks the optimization pass that it sorely needs. (Much more than a native array would) In a RELEASE build, your compiler will look for code that can be removed outright and most of your code is in that category. What you're likely seeing is the result of your optimizing compiler seeing that most ...


9

You can use an implementation of std::for_each from <algorithm> to access each individual element. There is an example in the Boost documentation Alternatively, you can use array::origin() and array::num_elements() as follows: boost::multi_array< double, 3 > ma(boost::extents[3][4][2]); for(auto i = ma.origin(); i < (ma.origin() + ...


7

Are you building release or debug? If running in debug mode, the boost array might be really slow because their template magic isn't inlined properly giving lots of overhead in function calls. I'm not sure how multi array is implemented though so this might be totally off :) Perhaps there is some difference in storage order as well so you might be having ...


6

You can encapsulate the creation of the array into an helper function: template <typename T, size_t N> boost::multi_array<T, N> make_regular_matrix(const size_t m) { boost::multi_array<T, N> arr; boost::array<size_t, N> extents; extents.assign(m); arr.resize(extents); return arr; } const int n = 3; int size = 4; ...


5

Turns out, std::vector has a constructor, that constructs a vector with a constant value repeated n times, so a possible solution looks like this: const int n=2, size=4; //# of dimensions and size of one dimension boost::multi_array<char,n> arr(std::vector<size_t>(n,size)); This initializes a n-dimensional multi_array with each dimension's ...


4

The operator< and operator<= being invoked here are templates; consequently, the value supplied to said operators for the Index argument must be the exact same type as the Index template parameter of the range being supplied. The boost::multi_array_types::index_range::index type ultimately boils down to a typedef for std::ptrdiff_t; given that you're ...


4

#include "boost/multi_array.hpp" #include <iostream> #include <algorithm> #include <iterator> int main () { typedef boost::multi_array_types::index_range range; typedef boost::multi_array<char, 2> Array2d; Array2d a(boost::extents[8][24]); //to view the two-dimensional array as a one-dimensional one can use ...


4

Consider using Blitz++ instead. I tried out Blitz, and its performance is on par with C-style array! Check out your code with Blitz added below: #include <windows.h> #define _SCL_SECURE_NO_WARNINGS #define BOOST_DISABLE_ASSERTS #include <boost/multi_array.hpp> #include <blitz/array.h> int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { const int ...


4

You should resize m_f before assigning. It could look like in the following sample: void set_f(boost::multi_array<short, 2> &f) { std::vector<size_t> ex; const size_t* shape = f.shape(); ex.assign( shape, shape+f.num_dimensions() ); m_f.resize( ex ); m_f = f; } May be there is a better way. Conversion short to char will ...


4

From the table of MultiView associated types: reference This is the reference type of the contained value. If NumDims == 1, then this is element&. Otherwise, this is the same type as template subarray::type. template array_view::type This is the view type with Dims dimensions. It is returned by calling operator. It models MultiArray. so ...


4

You could use shape() for a less convoluted way: #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <boost/multi_array.hpp> int main() { boost::multi_array<std::string, 2> a(boost::extents[3][5]); for(size_t x = 0; x < a.shape()[0]; x++) { for(size_t y = 0; y < a.shape()[1]; y++) { std::ostringstream ...


4

I would use the Proxy Pattern for this case. You just easily wrap around the proxy and define a unique interface which will use your underlying objects. Hope this helps.... Edit: I guess this link should be useful as well: Template Proxy


4

Your array is of value type (octreenode), not pointer type (octreenode*) Therefore you are not supposed to try to assign a pointer to a dynamically allocated octreenode (new is for heap allocation, by default). Instead, just assign a value: (*chunk)[cz][cx][cy] = octreenode(1,72); In fact, there's no reason to use new on the multi array in the ...


3

You need typename and/or .template qualification on dependent names: typedef typename array_type::array_view<dimensions-1>::type stride_type; If you're using a template member on a dependent name, you need .template qualification: obj.template foo<T>(); See this very popular answer for background Where and why do I have to put the ...


3

The fastest way to access every element of a boost::multi_array is via data() and num_elements(). With data() you gain access to the underlying raw storage (a contiguous block that contains the array‘s data) so there isn't need for multiple index calculations (consider also that multi_array can index arrays from bases different from 0 and this is a further ...


3

Best advice is to benchmark it by yourself. In any case, since you seem to have constant size there are other solutions: plain C arrays (eg. int data[X][Y][Z]) plain one dimensional C array in which you compute indices by yourself, eg X*W*H + Y*W + Z, can be handy in some situations std::array, which is basically a C++ array with some synctactic sugar ...


3

Those library vector classes are designed to be easy to use and relatively fail-safe. They are as fast as they can be within their design, but nothing can beat doing it yourself (except maybe hand-coded assembly). For the size you're talking about (2e10 elements), I would be more concerned with efficiency than with user-friendliness. If your innermost loop ...


3

The index_bases member function returns a container with each dimension's index base. The shape member function returns a container with each dimension's extent (size). You can use both of these to determine the range of indices for each dimension: typedef boost::multi_array<int, 3> array_type; typedef array_type::extent_range range; typedef ...


3

Please, try this. Сode has one disadvantage - it refers to ranges_ array variable declared at boost::detail:: multi_array namespace. #include <boost/multi_array.hpp> typedef boost::multi_array<double, 3> array_type; ...


3

From the Boost Multi-Array documentation, yes, you can initialize it one line: typedef boost::multi_array<double, 3> array_type; typedef array_type::index index; array_type A(boost::extents[3][4][2]); The typedefs are for readability, one can just as easily do for your example: boost::multi_array<int, 2> arr(boost::extents[2][4]);


2

It looks like boost::multi_array works just like std::valarray regarding assignment, that is the size of the 2 arrays must match. According to the documentation: Each of the array types multi_array, multi_array_ref, subarray, and array_view can be assigned from any of the others, so long as their shapes match.


2

array_type::array_view<1>::type You need template and typename here :) typename array_type::template array_view<1>::type ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ The keyword template is required because otherwise the < and > will be treated as less and greater because the array_type is a dependent name, and therefore whether array_view is a nested ...


2

The problem is that the ii_t<> input iterator class from the referred SO answer is 'reading' one too many items because the wrapped istream doesn't return EOF until the the dereference of the iterator after the one that returned the last item in the file. The extra returned data item is corrupting the allocated memory block in the multi_array object. ...


2

It looks like you may be missing a needed include, possibly for ordered_unique::nth_index.


2

It's how many dimensions you need. boost::extents[3][4][2] // we use 3 dimensions So if you change this number, you'll have to change this line to.


2

What do you suppose to pass as argument to function? What is const std::string & _attr? Anyway, BOOST_MULTI_INDEX_CONST_MEM_FUN is just a macro for const_mem_fun functor. You could write your own functor const_mem_fun1. But I have no idea how you going to use it. Implementation of const_mem_fun receives object by reference (or wrapper, e.g. shared_ptr) ...


2

I would have expected multiarray to be just as efficient. But I'm getting similar results on a PPC Mac using gcc. I also tried multiarrayref, so that both versions were using the same storage with no difference. This is good to know, since I use multiarray in some of my code, and just assumed it was similar to hand-coding.


2

multi_array library classes aren't designed for dynamic polymorphism. They don't have any virtual functions, so it doesn't look reasonable to make destructor virtual too. It's common STL-like design, multi_array_ref is just used as unified interface adapter for data owning and non-owning cases. Your usage sample is highly not recommended - it will lead to ...



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