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11

This will create a temporary that is immediately destroyed: boost::mutex::scoped_lock(this->ticketSaleMutex); resulting in no synchronization. You need to declare a variable: boost::mutex::scoped_lock local_lock(this->ticketSaleMutex);


10

This is what boost::recursive_mutex for it allows to obtain the lock by the same thread without deadlocking several times. Use it instead of boost::mutex


5

boost::mutex is not a copyable or moveable (using boost's move implementation) type, and hence, passing it in that way to the thread will not work, since that constructor makes a copy of the functor to execute on the thread. In your test case, you would want to use the following boost::thread tester_thread(boost::ref(functor)) This passes it by reference, ...


5

Your example code suffers from a couple synchronization issues as noted by others: Missing locks on calls to some of the members of ProtectedStack. Main thread could exit without allowing worker threads to join. The producer and consumer do not loop as you would expect. Producers should always (when they can) be producing, and consumers should keep ...


4

In addition to scoping the boost::lock_guard in a block, you can also use a boost::unique_lock which can be unlock()'ed explicitly: boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> ownlock(M); cout<<"TH"<<m<<" locked mutex\n"; Wait_(15); //simple wait for few milliseconds ownlock.unlock(); This is useful if you need to release the mutex before ...


4

If an exception is thrown, or the function returns, between lines 1 and 3, then the mutex will not be unlocked. The next time anyone tries to lock it, their thread will wait indefinitely. On a Posix platform, boost::mutex is a very thin wrapper around a pthread_mutex_t, and lock_guard just contains a reference to the mutex, and unlocks it in its destructor. ...


3

boost::atomic<bool> was added in boost v1.53.0, based on c++11 std::atomics. For example: #include <boost/atomic.hpp> boost::atomic<bool> is_killing (false); while (!is_killing) { } This would eliminate the explicit mutex and the safe_access function from the code, providing the synchronization required.


3

Use std::ref or std::cref around the mutex. That is, instead of: boost::mutex yourmutex; boost::bind(..., yourmutex, ...); write: boost::mutex yourmutex; boost::bind(..., std::ref(yourmutex), ...);


3

The mutex can't be copied, it is a system resource, so if you have it in some class which get's copied, the compiler generated copy constructor is called, the compiler generated copy constructor tries to copy the mutex, but it's copy constructer is private. hence the error. If you wan't a copy of the resource chances are you'de like a different mutex, so ...


3

You need to make the class noncopyable, or implement your own copy and assignment operator. boost::mutex is non copyable, therefore you get this error. You can derive your class from boost::noncopyable, to make it noncopyable.


3

Something like: void THfoo(int m){ // use a scope here, this means that the lock_guard will be destroyed (and therefore mutex unlocked on exiting this scope { cout<<"TH"<<m<<" started and attempts locking M\n"; boost::lock_guard<boost::mutex> ownlock(M); cout<<"TH"<<m<<" locked mutex\n"; ...


3

There are different things that you can do here. You can use a recursive mutex that can be acquired multiple times within the same thread, or you can split methodA into a private method with the implementation and no locks and a public method that locks and then calls the private implementation. Then methodB would call the internal implementation while ...


3

UPDATE My other answer addresses scheduling resources among threads (after the question was clarified). It shows both a semaphore approach to coordinate work among (many) workers, and a thread_pool to limit workers in the first place and queue the work. On linux (and perhaps other OSes?) you can use a lock file idiom (but it's not supported with ...


3

You can create the lock guard after locking, telling it to adopt the lock: if(a_timed_mutex.try_lock_for(boost::chrono::seconds(1))) { boost::lock_guard<boost::mutex> lock(a_timed_mutex, boost::adopt_lock_t()); // Do the work } else { // Handle the acquisition failure } The standard lock_guard also allows this.


3

You don't really want to do this in most cases. If you do want to do it, you probably want to use futures, like this: auto f = std::async(std::launch::async, [&]() { // do work in another thread here. }); boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> process_lock(process_mutex); auto result = f.get(); // proceed here the work is done and you have the ...


3

The problem you'll have is that without some sort of locking or memory barrier it is possible (for example) that the gui thread might set the bool to true but the thread won't actually see this due to compiler optimizations or optimizations at the CPU level. What you need to do is write to the bool in such a way that the current state is loaded from memory, ...


3

This code should compile class MyClass { mutable boost::mutex _mutex; void foo() const { boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(_mutex); //critical section } }


2

I think mcmcc's idea wasn't too far off, but instead generic std::swap() which will perform vector copy, you should be able to use std::vector::swap(). Functionally vector's swap function works identically to generic one, but it is much faster since it simply exchanges few pointer/size variables and doesn't actually do element copies. So your lock will ...


2

Function1_vector_copy () { VectorType tmp = vectorb; rwLock.acquireWrite(); swap(tmp,vectora); rwLock.releaseWrite(); } The rest is left as an exercise for the reader. UPDATE: Summarizing the comments below... First of all I should make clear that the original swap(...) call above was intended as pseudo-code, not necessarily to be ...


2

Regarding point 3: Your boost::mutex wouldn't be visible to your other process. A interprocess mutex uses a system globally named object that can be accessed by another process, afaik, a boost::mutex does not. Your boost::mutex created in shared memory, may in Windows for example, have a HANDLE to a windows Mutex object, which would be allocated on your ...


2

The major problem with your code is that your threads are not synchronized. Remember that by default threads execution isn't ordered and isn't sequenced, so consumer threads actually can be (and in your particular case are) finished before any producer thread produces any data. To make sure consumers will be run after producers finished its work you need to ...


2

The first idea is that your PrimitiveObj that you are calling is uninitialized, something like this: PrimitiveObj* myObject; myObject->getPos(); The exception you have is most likely you accessing an uninitialized pointer variable (set to 0xdddddddd so the developer recognizes it as uninitialized) and accessing a member on it that is offset by 0x10 ...


2

Thanks to the comments on my question, I ended up doing several things: Stopped using operator[] in the read function and made the read function const. Stopped using the condition_variable Used shared_mutex based on the example in this other post. The code: map<std::string, double> collection; mutable boost::shared_mutex collectionMutex; ... ...


2

Just add the duration to the current time: auto now = boost::posix_time::microsec_clock::universal_time();


2

I'm not a C++ guru, but it seems like the unholy mix of pass by reference and pointers is trouble here. Specifically you do this: this->index_service = index_service; But the value is passed in as Indexer &index_service And since the local index_service is type Indexer index_service; I believe that the assignment implies copy. I assume you only ...


2

Boost offers this functionality through the UpgradeLockable concept. The method you are looking for is unlock_and_lock_shared(). An implementation of this concept is provided by the upgrade_mutex class.


2

This is actually very easy. There's a different constructor you can call for the lock that requests the actual lock on the mutex to be deferred. You can then call the try_lock() method to attempt to obtain the lock, which is a non-blocking call that returns a boolean indicating whether the lock was successfully taken or not. In your case, you could use this ...


2

If you look at the documentation, boost::timed_mutex::scoped_lock is just an alias for boost::unique_lock<timed_mutex>: class timed_mutex: boost::noncopyable { public: // ... typedef unique_lock<timed_mutex> scoped_timed_lock; typedef unspecified-type scoped_try_lock; typedef scoped_timed_lock scoped_lock; // ... }; ...


2

A boost thread_group is a group of threads. All the threads are, by definition, distinct and unique. So, if your mutex fails to... "mut-ex" (mutually exclude) this indicates a programmer error elsewhere. On a whim, I'd suggest that perhaps your expectations of mutexes (recursive or not) is not accurate (in similar way as the expectations of a thread ...


1

Yes the two threads are independent but the mutex they are using is same. So if that mutex is locked, then the thread will get stuck till mutex is released by the other thread.



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