Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

39

I've run into this issue myself. The key to a solution is that the function po::store populates the variables_map while po::notify raises any errors encountered, so vm can be used prior to any notifications being sent. So, as per Tim, set each option to required, as desired, but run po::notify(vm) after you've dealt with the help option. This way it ...


22

By using a custom validator and boost::program_options::value::multitoken, you can achieve the desired result: #include <iostream> #include <boost/lexical_cast.hpp> #include <boost/optional.hpp> #include <boost/program_options.hpp> // Holds parameters for seed/expansion model struct Model { std::string type; ...


22

On Debian systems, you find it in /usr/share/doc/libboost-doc/examples/libs/program_options. Otherwise, I suggest to download the archive from boost.org and have a look there.


21

Please use the implicit_value method, e.g desc.add_options() ("replay,r", po::value<std::string>()->implicit_value("stdin"), "bla bla bla") This makes the option accept either 0 or 1 token, and if no tokens are provided, it will act as if 'stdin' was provided. Of course, you can pick any other implicit value -- including empty string and '-' as ...


20

One guy OXPEHOMETP on a russian programmers forum gave me a pice of advice to use boost::program_options::bool_switch(). When defining an option with no value via value-permitted interface, one must pass not boost::program_options::typed_value() as semantics, but bool_switch(). This means that no value can be explicitly taken for this option from the ...


17

I think the -l param is wrong. Try getting rid of the lib text, using -lboost_program_options.


17

In your case, you simply need to overload operator>> to extract a Length::Unit from an istream, as shown here: #include <iostream> #include <boost/foreach.hpp> #include <boost/program_options.hpp> namespace Length { enum Unit {METER, INCH};}; typedef std::vector<Length::Unit> UnitList; std::istream& ...


17

This is a late answer but I hope it helps someone. You could easily use the same technique in item #1, except you need to add another validation on the number of items in your vector: from rcollyer's example: namespace po = boost::program_options; po::option_descriptions desc(""); desc.add_options() ("opt", po::value<std::vector<int> ...


16

Here is complete program as per rcollyer and Tim, whom the credits go to: #include <boost/program_options.hpp> #include <iostream> #include <sstream> namespace po = boost::program_options; bool process_command_line(int argc, char** argv, std::string& host, std::string& port, ...


16

For the first part, this should work namespace po = boost::program_options; po::option_descriptions desc(""); desc.add_options() ("opt", po::value<std::vector<int> >()->multitoken(), "description"); The second part, requires a bit more work. The function po::value returns a po::typed_value< T, charT > on which you'll have to ...


16

It's a bit of a strange syntax in C++ but if you're familiar with JS (for example), you might be aware of the concept of method chaining. This is a bit like that. add_options() returns an object with operator() defined. The second line calls operator() on the object returned by the first line. The method returns a reference to the original object, so you ...


15

default_value() is the value that will be put in the variables_map if the user didn't specify another value: ./a.out # implies width=75 if that's the default_value for width ./a.out --width=80 # default_value not used implicit_value() is the value that will be used if the user specifies the option but without an adjacent value. ./a.out ...


15

boost::any is not applicable to your problem. It performs the most basic form of type erasure: storage and (type-safe) retrieval, and that's it. As you've seen, no other operations can be performed. As jhasse points out, you could just test every type you want to support, but this is a maintenance nightmare. Better would be to expand upon the idea ...


15

Short options by definition have just one character. If they had more, they'd be long options. To allow long options to start with a single dash, include the allow_long_disguise command-line style, as described on the documentation page you linked to: It's possible to introduce long options by the same character as short options, see ...


15

You can use the custom validator feature. Define a distinct type for your option, and then overload the validate function on that type. struct catdog { catdog(std::string const& val): value(val) { } std::string value; }; void validate(boost::any& v, std::vector<std::string> const& values, catdog* /* ...


13

According to the documentation you can specify that an option is required in the option description: options_description desc; desc.add_options() ("help", "produce help") ("count", value<int>()->required(), "number of executions") ;


13

use boost::program_options::variable_value::defaulted() if (vm["magic-wings-threshold"].defaulted()) { // assume defaulted value } else { // one was provided }


12

When using boost::program_options to parse a INI file, the option names must be prefixed by their enclosing section names. In other words, sections are part of the option 'identifier', but I don't think you have a way to identify to which section a given server.ip variable belongs (and thus, which is the associated server.password). I think you should ...


12

program_options automatically assigns default values to options when the user doesn't supply those options. You don't even need to check whether the user supplied a given option, just use the same assignment in either case. #include <iostream> #include <boost/program_options.hpp> namespace po = boost::program_options; int main (int argc, ...


12

Looking at $(BOOST_ROOT)/libs/program_options/src/value_semantic.cpp you can find: /* Validates bool value. Any of "1", "true", "yes", "on" will be converted to "1".<br> Any of "0", "false", "no", "off" will be converted to "0".<br> Case is ignored. The 'xs' vector can either be empty, in which case the value is 'true', or can ...


11

Looking at the tutorial, I don't see commas between the options. ie: desc.add_options() ("help", "produce help message") // no comma here! ("compression", po::value<int>(), "set compression level") ; Try removing the commas you have at the end of each option.


9

For the "default_value" method, the first parameter is the real value that you wish your option to be, the second value being only the textual representation (for display in --help) when boost cannot infer it. So, the solution to your problem is to write: po::value< vector<string> >()->default_value( vector<string>(1, ...


9

My answer comes a little too late, but I spent some time trying to do something similar and found an annoyingly obvious solution (incase anyone else is looking for this)... Recalling that boost::program_options::variables_map derives from std::map<std::string, boost::program_options::variable_value>, you can do perfectly legal STL map processing ...


9

The program_options::value_semantic class doesn't parameterize the argument name, so I think you will have to define your own class. Something like this: struct my_arg_type : public boost::program_options::typed_value<int> { my_arg_type(std::string const& name) : boost::program_options::typed_value<int>(&my_value) ...


9

when I explicitly indicate no positional options are supported: const po::positional_options_description p; // note empty positional options po::store( po::command_line_parser( argc, argv). options( desc ). positional( p ). run(), vm ...


9

There's not a way using program_options that I'm aware of. You could use the property tree library to write the ini file. Here is a short example: macmini:stackoverflow samm$ cat property.cc #include <boost/property_tree/ptree.hpp> #include <boost/property_tree/ini_parser.hpp> #include <iostream> int main() { using ...


9

Use boost::program_options. It's exactly what it's for. In one library you get command line options, environment variables options and an INI-like configuration file parser. And they're all integrated together in the Right way, so when then the user specifies the same option in more than one of these sources the library knows the Right priority order to ...


9

The advantage question is subjective, but in this case it's brevity. Compare this from one of my home projects: ("help,h", "Generate this help message") ("output-file,o", po::value<std::string>(), "Output filename. Required.") ("tangent,t", "Generate/load tangent-space basis.") ("collada-output,c", "Write a Collada file, rather than our mesh XML ...


8

From boost/program_options/value_semantic.hpp: /** Specifies default value, which will be used if none is explicitly specified. The type 'T' should provide operator<< for ostream. */ typed_value* default_value(const T& v) { m_default_value = boost::any(v); m_default_value_as_text = ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible