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21

Remember that there may be multiple IP addresses for any one hostname, boost gives you an iterator that will go through them. The use is fairly straightforward, add this before return 0; of your program: std::cout << "IP addresses: \n"; boost::asio::io_service io_service; boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver resolver(io_service); ...


15

Here is an example of basic usage: #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <boost/regex.hpp> int main(){ std::string str = "hellooooooooo"; std::string newtext = "o Bob"; boost::regex re("ooooooooo"); std::cout << str << std::endl; std::string result = boost::regex_replace(str, re, newtext); std::cout ...


14

Perhaps you're looking for something like this. It uses regex_iterator to get all matches of the current pattern. See reference. #include <boost/regex.hpp> #include <iostream> #include <string> int main() { std::string text(" 192.168.0.1 abc 10.0.0.255 10.5.1 1.2.3.4a 5.4.3.2 "); const char* pattern = ...


13

((\\w+)(::)?)+ is one of the so called "pathological" regular expressions -- it's going to take exponential time, because you have two expressions which are dependent upon each other one right after the other. That is, it fails due to catastrophic backtracking. Consider if we follow the example of the link, and reduce "something more complicated" to "x". ...


12

Heh. Your problem is your regex. Change your (.\*)s to (.\*?)s (assuming that's supported). You think you're seeing each line being matched, but in fact you're seeing the entire text being matched because your pattern is greedy. To see the issue illustrated, change the debug output in your loop to: cout << "[" << match << "]" << ...


12

Some Boost libraries have to be built; this is one of them. Here's how you can build them: Make a new file called boost_build.bat, and inside put: bjam toolset=msvc-9.0 variant=release threading=multi link=static define=_SECURE_SCL=0 define=_HAS_ITERATOR_DEBUGGING=0 bjam toolset=msvc-9.0 variant=debug threading=multi link=static Note 9.0 refers to VS ...


9

I think Dot Net has the ability to make single capture group Collections so that (grp)+ will create a collection object on group1. The boost engine's regex_search() is going to be just like any ordinary match function. You sit in a while() loop matching the pattern where the last match left off. The form you used does not use a bid-itterator, so the function ...


8

"q\[0\]123" compiles? \[ is not a backslash character followed by an opening square bracket character. It's an escape sequence. I don't remember it being a valid escape sequence, but it might be an extension in your compiler. You need to escape the backslashes like "q\\[0\\]123", or use a C++11 raw string literal like R"(q\[0\]123)".


7

You could add the std::regex_constants::match_continuous flag when using regex_search, for example, the following prints "1" and "0": #include <regex> #include <string> int main() { std::regex rx ("\\d+"); printf("%d\n", std::regex_search("12345abc1234", rx, std::regex_constants::match_continuous)); ...


6

When you link it, put -l and put appropriate boost lib name there. In this case, the correct library name is 'boost_regex-mt'.


6

Are you sure you need regex for that? #include <iostream> #include <algorithm> int main() { using namespace std; string x = "http://www.google.co.in/search/search/?h=test&q=examaple"; size_t sp = x.find_first_of( '/', 7 /* skip http:// part */ ); if ( sp != string::npos ) { string base_url( x.begin()+7, x.begin()+sp ); ...


6

Boost.Regex offers experimental support for exactly this feature (called repeated captures); however, since it's huge performance hit, this feature is disabled by default. To enable repeated captures, you need to rebuild Boost.Regex and define macro BOOST_REGEX_MATCH_EXTRA in all translation units; the best way to do this is to uncomment this define in ...


6

You have numbers in your example string, but are using letters in your regex, was that intended? I suppose I would use a regex something like this: \((\([0-9]+ [0-9]+\) )+\) If we break it down, here's my thought process: \( // start with a literal "(" ( // create a group \( // another literal "(" [0-9]+ // one or more digits // a ...


6

The boost regex library made it into C++0x so I'm guessing it will slowly be removed from boost. However, using boost is nice because you can still use it with compilers without C++0x support. So it's really up to you.


5

You need to use the overload of regex_search that takes a match_results object. In your case: #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <boost/regex.hpp> int main () { std::string url = "http://mydomain.com/randompage.php"; boost::regex exp("^https?://([^/]*?)/"); boost::smatch match; if (boost::regex_search(url, match, ...


5

You need to link to libboost_regex. Add -lboost_regex to the compiler switch if you're using gcc.


5

By itself it means nothing special, it just matches !. It can be combined with other symbols to mean other things: (?!...) is a negative lookahead - it matches if the following characters do not match the "..." portion (?<!...) is a negative lookbehind - it matches if the preceding characters do not match the "..." portion


4

I believe regex_match() matches against the entire string. Try regex_search() instead. It would have worked with the following regex: boost::regex r(".*\\..*"); and the regex_match() function. But again, regex_search() is what you're probably looking for.


4

boost::regex is one of the few components of boost that doesn't exist solely in header files...there is a library module. It is likely that the library you are using was built with different settings than your application. Edit: Found an example scenario with this known boost bug, where boost must be built with the same -malign-double flag as your ...


4

Use the position member function of the match_results: int find_match_offset(std::string const& string_to_search, boost::regex const& expression) { boost::smatch results; if(boost::regex_match(string_to_search,results,expression)) { return results.position() } return -1; }


4

Either add libboost_regex-gcc-1_35.a to your list of object files in your link step or add -static -lboost_regex-gcc-1_35 to the same. Also be sure that you have an -I switch pointing to your boost includes directory in your compile step. If the libraries are outside the typical search path (/usr/lib on *nix), add that directory to your link command with ...


4

You need the double backslash '\\' if you don't use c++0x raw strings.


4

The question is how exactly do you want to match these, and what else do you want to exclude? It's trivial (but rarely useful) to match any incoming string with a simple .*. To match these more exactly (and add the possibility of extracting things like the user name and/or IP), you could use something like: "User ([^,]*), IP: (\\d{1,3}(\\.\\d{1,3}){3})". ...


4

You need something like this boost::regex regex("your expression here", boost::regex::icase); boost::smatch what; string mystring; bool search_result = boost::regex_search(mystring.begin(),mystring.end(), what, regex);


4

[0-9]{3}-[0-5]{2}-[0-9]{3} matches a string that starts with three digits between 0 and 9, followed by a dash, followed by two digits between 0 and 5, followed by a dash, followed by three digits between 0 and 9. Is that what you're looking for? This is very basic regex stuff. I suggest you look at a good tutorial. EDIT: (after you changed your ...


4

You cannot parse HTML with regular expressions. For normal context-free grammars, I'd suggest just getting a parser, but the realistic state of HTML is that you need a dedicated HTML parser library.


4

Maybe it's because in your compile command, you said to use /my_path/boost-1.49.0/include/boost as include path and then, in your source code you #include <boost/regex.hpp>. My guess is that regex.hpp is searched in /my_path/boost-1.49.0/include/boost/boost/regex.hpp. It is obviously not found, so system one is found. Could you try with : g++ -v -I ...


4

One major difference is, that C++11 does not provide the Perl syntax for regular expressions. So, if you tend to use Perl syntax you have to use the Boost::Regex library.



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