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28

I've been using Boost Serialization for a long time and just dug into protocol buffers, and I think they don't have the exact same purpose. BS (didn't see that coming) saves your C++ objects to a stream, whereas PB is an interchange format that you read to/from. PB's datamodel is way simpler: you get all kinds of ints and floats, strings, arrays, basic ...


21

I've played around a little with both systems, nothing serious, just some simple hackish stuff, but I felt that there's a real difference in how you're supposed to use the libraries. With boost::serialization, you write your own structs/classes first, and then add the archiving methods, but you're still left with some pretty "slim" classes, that can be used ...


16

Returning to this question, I realized I must've fixed it sometime last year (as I'm using saveGZString right now). Digging to see how I fixed it, it was pretty silly/simple: namespace bar = boost::archive; namespace bio = boost::iostreams; template <typename T> inline std::string saveGZString(const T & o) { std::ostringstream oss; ...


16

Hey guys I finally found a solution on how to serialize the std::shared_ptr using boost serialization. All you need is the following piece of code (explanation follows): #include <boost/serialization/split_free.hpp> #include <boost/unordered_map.hpp> //---/ Wrapper for std::shared_ptr<> /------------------------------------------ ...


15

We use boost::asio and Protobuf for complex, low message rate protocols. For simple, high message rate protocols we do boost::asio and custom serialization. The C++ Protobuf library uses std::string to represent the string fields for messages that it deserializes, which means a free store allocation is performed by Protobuf for every string field in every ...


15

There are a couple of additional concerns with boost.serialization that I'll add to the mix. Caveat: I don't have any direct experience with protocol buffers beyond skimming the docs. Note that while I think boost, and boost.serialization, is great at what it does, I have come to the conclusion that the default archive formats it comes with are not a great ...


12

I could reproduce the problem using the following code: #include "boost/archive/text_oarchive.hpp" #include "boost/serialization/vector.hpp" #include <vector> #include <string> int main() { std::vector<std::string> tasks; boost::archive::text_oarchive oa(std::cout); oa << tasks; } This compiles and links without ...


12

Include <boost/serialization/vector.hpp>. Don't allocate vector dynamically. Don't forget to link to Serialization, it's not header-only library.


12

I used boost.serialization to store matrices and vectors representing lookup tables and some meta data (strings) with an in memory size of about 200MByte. IIRC for loading from disk into memory it took 3 minutes for the text archive vs. 4 seconds using the binary archive on WinXP.


11

I have no experience with boost serialization, but I have used protocol buffers. I like protocol buffers a lot. Keep the following in mind (I say this with no knowledge of boost). Protocol buffers are very efficient so I don't imagine that being a serious issue vs. boost. Protocol buffers provide an intermediate representation that works with other ...


11

Boost Serialisation is a library for writing data into a stream. does not compress data. does not support data versioning automatically. supports STL containers. properties of data written depend on streams chosen (e.g. endian, compressed). Protocol Buffers generates code from interface description (supports C++, Python and Java by default. C, C# and ...


11

Presumably you need to link to the serialization library. Have a look in /usr/lib for something with a name similar to libboost_serialization. Then tell g++ (you didn't say which compiler you are using) you want to use (link to) this library: g++ main.cpp -lboost_serialization I.e. if the name of the library is /usr/lib/libboost_serialization.a you leave ...


11

If you find out that Google Protocol Buffers are to heavy (I can agree with that because compiled library could take more than 1 MB), maybe you could try lite version of protobuf. Lite version is few times smaller. Support for lite version could be enabled in *.proto by inserting following line option optimize_for = LITE_RUNTIME; More about this could be ...


10

try using a text_iarchive and text_oarchive instead of binary archives. From the documentation In this tutorial, we have used a particular archive class - text_oarchive for saving and text_iarchive for loading. text archives render data as text and are portable across platforms. In addition to text archives, the library includes archive ...


10

boost.serialization just needs the C++ compiler and gives you some syntax sugar like serialize_obj >> archive; // ... unserialize_obj << archive; for saving and loading. If C++ is the only language you use you should give boost.serialization a serious shot. I took a fast look at google protocol buffers. From what I see I'd say its not ...


9

#include <boost/serialization/version.hpp> :-)


9

You should read the boost::serialization documentation on the subject of serializable concept. It basically says that the types needs to be primitive or Serializable. The Eigen type is none of it, which your compiler is trying to tell you. In order to make Eigen types serializable you will need to implement the following free function template<class ...


8

the flag no_header eliminates the heading lines unsigned int flags = boost::archive::no_header; boost::archive::xml_oarchive oa(ofs, flags); the following macro eliminates the attributes BOOST_CLASS_IMPLEMENTATION(Test, object_serializable)


8

boost:archive::binary_xarchive are currently not portable With my interpretation that means that there can be differences on different platforms. The text archives gives you the same input/output behaviour on all systems. Also there is a related TODO entry which tries to solve the portability issue of the binary archives: TODO Entry


7

as mentioned by ildjarn, I managed to cook up the following solution, and at the first glance, everything works: #include <iostream> #include <memory> #include <fstream> #include <boost/archive/text_oarchive.hpp> #include <boost/archive/text_iarchive.hpp> namespace boost { namespace serialization { template<class Archive, ...


7

Since Matrix in Eigen are dense, so you can replace the for-loop in Jakob's answer with make_array as: ar & boost::serialization::make_array(t.data(), t.size()); I made a more detailed answer in this post: http://stackoverflow.com/a/23407209/1686769


7

Boost.serialization is backward-compatible but is not guaranteed to be forwards compatible. This means: you can create an archive with an older version of boost.serialization that can be read with a newer version. There is no guarantee that an archive created with a newer version of boost.serialization will be readable by a older one. If you send ...


7

It looks like you found out that boost::program_options::variables_map derives from std::map so you can use its serialization (but see the warning later on this). If the only remaining problem is serializing the boost::any values it contains then you're almost there. You can't serialize an arbitrary boost::any because it doesn't really know how to ...


7

You have two concerns, one of which is a consequence of the other: 1) You should not allow any exception to escape the destructor. If you do, and if the destructor is being called as part of stack unwinding, then the runtime will terminate() your program. This is not undefined behaviour, but it's pretty negative. Because of this (and also of course because ...


6

Even when partial specialization for serialzation exists for std:vector<T> this does not imply it will work for subclasses, so you have to add a serialization method for ring: template<class Archive> inline void serialize(Archive & ar, ring &t, const unsigned int file_version) { // Impl } So what's in the implementation? As ...


6

Before calling BOOST_CLASS_EXPORT_* you should include the archives which you want to use. The makro then adds specific serialize-functions for the headers. This means you should change your code in hier.cpp to the following: #include <boost/serialization/export.hpp> #include <boost/archive/text_iarchive.hpp> #include ...


6

The performance with text_archives is magnitudes slower than binary_archive. If performance is your thing, you may try out an unofficial portable binary archive eos_portable_archive. I've used it to serialize data across 32 bit and 64 bit on Windows with success. You may give it a go. Just need to put the files in your serialization directory. The files ...


6

I think that the archive refers to it's function in archiving data, not as being obsolete...


5

The question is what do you really want to achieve by serializing pointers? What is your expected output? Note that pointers point to a place in memory -- several may point to the same place in memory. Serializing the address won't work. You can't just write down the exact memory address, because there's no way to guarantee that objects on the next run ...


5

Correction to above (guess this is that answer) about Boost Serialization : It DOES allow supporting data versioning. If you need compression - use a compressed stream. Can handle endian swapping between platforms as encoding can be text, binary or XML.



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