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35

This a really good question (and also a can of worms) because it gets at the interface of qi and phoenix. I haven't seen an example either, so I'll extend the article a little in this direction. As you say, functions for semantic actions can take up to three parameters Matched attribute - covered in the article Context - contains the qi-phoenix ...


12

If Integer is supposed to be the attribute exposed by the rule, you need to declare it as: qi::rule<Iterator, Integer()> integer; (note the parenthesis). Spirit requires to use the function declaration syntax to describe the rule's 'interface'. It is used not only in Spirit but by several other libraries as well (see boost::function for instance). ...


12

It's pretty much impossible to diagnose your issue if you don't post a complete, coherent repro; it could be a syntax error, it could be a missing #include, who knows..? Here's a working demonstration; hopefully you can use it as a reference to figure out what's wrong with your code: ///// grammar implementation ///// #include ...


12

The simplest answer is qi::phrase_parse(str.begin(), str.end(), grammar, ascii::blank); Of course, it depends on your grammar too: if it expects a specific skipper class you might need to change that. See below for a generic way to handle that (although you could just specify qi::blank_type for a Grammar that should only accept qi::blank). The sample ...


11

You are using space as the skipper for your calls to phrase_parse. This parser matches any character for which std::isspace returns true (assuming you're doing ascii based parsing). For this reason the \r\n in the input are eaten by your skipper before they can be seen by your eol parser.


11

A: There's nothing little wrong with the grammar, but you're using qi::phrase_parse which requires a skipper. Use qi::parse and the problem goes away. Note 1: Using [_val=_1] is completely redundant there; rules without semantic attributes enjoy automatic attribute propagation. Note 2: You might want to use qi::match to do parsing like this: #include ...


10

As far as debugging, its possible to use a normal break and watch approach. This is made difficult by how you've formatted the rules though. If you format per the spirit examples (~one parser per line, one phoenix statement per line), break points will be much more informative. Your data structure doesn't have a way to distinguish A() from SOME in that ...


10

Most likely the issue is std::pair<std::string,std::string>. The problem is that there is a comma in the type, which will play havoc with the macro expansion (when using the last element of your list). You should try wrapping the type in its own set of parentheses.


10

I'm sure Hartmut will answer in a second. Till then, this is my take: No that is not an official point. Semantic actions have some drawbacks The simplest disadvantage of semantic actions is the stylistic notion of separation of concerns. You want to express syntax in one place, and semantics in another. This helps maintainability (especially with regards ...


10

Of course you can. In your case, just put address_grammar<iter> address_; in your code. Let me show you another example. You can find a compilable code here: http://ideone.com/GW4jO (see also below) AFAIK, unlike qi::grammar, qi::rule is hard to reuse. Full Sample #include <string> #include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp> #include ...


10

You're fundamentally misunderstanding the purpose of (or at least misusing) a skip parser – qi::space, used as a skip parser, is for making your parser whitespace agnostic such that there is no difference between a b and ab. In your case, the whitespace is important, as you want it to delimit words. Consequently, you shouldn't be skipping whitespace, ...


10

There are several ways :) Custom attribute traits The same using semantic actions Everything in semantic actions, at detail level 1. Custom attribute traits The cleanest, IMO would to replace the Fusion Sequence Adaptation (BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT) by custom container attribute traits for Spirit: namespace boost { namespace spirit { namespace traits ...


9

For your specific example, I think it's actually described in the Boost Spirit documentation under RealPolicies Specialization. To make things a bit easier for you, I whipped out a quick "real" parser, that only parses real numbers and not integers(or at least it worked with your simplified examples): template <typename T> struct strict_real_policies ...


9

The reference to qq becomes dangling after leaving the constructor, so that is indeed a problem. qi::locals is the canonical way to keep local state inside parser expressions. Your other option would be to extend the lifetime of qq (by making it a member of the grammar class, e.g.). Lastly, you might be interested in inherited attributes as well. This ...


9

Here's my take on it I believe the rule that will have been the blocker for you would be figure = eps >> "figure" >> name [ at_c<0>(_val) = _1 ] >> '{' >> *( ipoints [ push_back(at_c<1>(_val), _1) ] | fpoints [ push_back(at_c<2>(_val), _1) ] ) >> '}'; This is ...


9

You have been paying a lot of attention in Spirit Class :) There were a number of issues: the attribute declaration of the line rule was wrong: qi::rule<It, myline, Skipper, qi::locals<Rule<myline>*> > line; needs to be qi::rule<It, myline(), Skipper, qi::locals<Rule<myline>*> > line; Automatic attribute ...


8

+(char_) consumes one or more char, so it will also consume commas and will never move to >> ','. It's greedy. You should write +(char_ - ','), using difference operator -: //... >> int_ >> ',' >> +(char_ - ',') >> ',' >> +(char_ - ',') >> ',' >> double_ //... Parser +(char_ - ',') would ...


8

I have given things a quick scan. My profiler quickly told me that constructing the grammar and (especially) the lexer object took quite some resources. Indeed, just changing a single line in SpiritParser.cpp saved 40% of execution time1 (~28s down to ~17s): lexer::Lexer lexer; into static const lexer::Lexer lexer; Now, making the ...


7

Your grammar could be written as: qi::rule< IteratorT, std::string(), ascii::space_type > text; qi::rule< IteratorT, std::string() > content; qi::rule< IteratorT, char() > escChar; text = "Text{" >> content >> "};"; content = +(~char_('}') | escChar); escChar = '\\' >> char_("\\{}"); i.e. text is "Text{" ...


7

That is because you hit a bug in Spirit's directive repeat[]. Thanks for the report, I fixed this problem in SVN (rev. [66167]) and it will be available in Boost V1.45. At the same time I would like to add your small test as a regression test to Spirit's test suite. I hope you don't mind me doing so.


7

Several remarks: a) don't use the Spirit V2 beta version distributed with Boost V1.39 and V1.40. Use at least Spirit V2.1 (as released with Boost V1.41) instead, as it contains a lot of bug fixes and performance enhancements (both, compile time and runtime performance). If you can't switch Boost versions, read here for how to proceed. b) Try to avoid using ...


7

String handling (the way you do it) got a lot easier with more recent versions of Spirit. I'd suggest to use Spirit from Boost V1.47, which got a major rewrite of the attribute handling code. But even if it compiled the way you want, it wouldn't parse the way you expect. Spirit is inherently greedy, that means that +char_ will consume whatever is left in ...


7

template < typename Iterator > struct parser : boost::spirit::qi::grammar < Iterator, double(), boost::spirit::ascii::space_type > { struct cast_impl { template < typename A > struct result { typedef double type; }; double operator()(boost::fusion::vector < boost::uint16_t, ...


7

Firstly, do switch to Spirit V2 - which has superseded classical spirit for years now. Second, you need to make sure an int gets preferred. By default, a double can parse any integer equally well, so you need to use strict_real_policies instead: real_parser<double, strict_real_policies<double>> strict_double; Now you can simply state number ...


7

Look at qi::as_string: Output of demo program: DEBUG: 'some\\"quoted\\"string.' parse success To be honest, it looks like you are really trying to parse 'verbatim' strings with possible escape chars. In the respect, the use of lexeme seem wrong (the spaces get eaten). If you want to see samples of escaped string parsing, see e.g. Boost Spirit ...


7

The simplest thing that could work, if you ask me would be http://liveworkspace.org/code/1fvc8x$0 equation = (expression >> "=" >> expression) [ _val = _1 == _2 ]; This will parse two expressions, and the returned attribute is a bool that indicates whether both expressions evaluated to the same value. The demonstration program int main() { ...


7

Edit Moved my early response to the bottom BIG UPDATE That took a while. Mostly it was because the code shown has strange problems: several rules contain syntax errors (function_call and factor_ there is a reference to GetContainerId and GetSubstring was never Phoenix-adapted The type CTranslationFunctions didn't exist, and member functions were being ...


6

The problem is the sequence you added the token definitions to the lexer. Your code this->self += identifier | number | if_ | else_; first adds the identifier token, which will perfectly match the 'if' (and any other keyword) as well. If you change that to this->self += if_ | else_ | identifier | number; everythings starts to work as it should. ...


6

qi::skip_type is not something you could use a skipper. qi::skip_type is the type of the placeholder qi::skip, which is applicable for the skip[] directive only (to enable skipping inside a lexeme[] or to change skipper in use) and which is not a parser component matching any input on its own. You need to specify your specific skipper type instead (in your ...


6

Yes, the skipper eats the newline characters. lexeme[eol] doesn't help either because the lexeme directive invokes the skipper before switching to no-skipper mode (see here for more details). In order to avoid skipping newlines, either use a different skipper type, or wrap the eol components into no_skip[eol], which is semantically equivalent to lexeme[], ...



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