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5

There are data races on future_shared_state::value and future_shared_state::error, set_value and set_exception access them without acquiring the mutex that wait uses to guard them. The actual problem you are experiencing is due to your use of boost::mutex::scoped_lock in the callers of future_shared_state::wait: you successfully avoid locking the mutex ...


2

Your program simply has a race, most probably due to the fact that 1 nanosecond is awfully short. try_join_for is implemented by calling try_join_until, a function that will attempt joining until a certain timepoint has been reached: // I stripped some unrelated template stuff from the code // to make it more readable bool try_join_for(const ...


1

You could use a sleep: #include <boost/thread.hpp> struct MyClass { boost::thread timeoutThread; boost::thread workerThread; void TimeoutThread() { boost::this_thread::sleep_for(boost::chrono::milliseconds(15)); workerThread.interrupt(); } void WorkerThread() { ...


1

If I understand you correctly, you need to fix last lines on your loop (see comments for descriptions): // io_service.stop(); // threads.join_all(); work.reset(); // <- signal to process all pending jobs and quit from io_service::run function threads.join_all(); // <- wait for all threads io_service.reset(); // <- now `io_service` can accept new ...


1

The joy is that your threads are actually terminating asynchronously, destructing the StreamX instances. Using a detector: struct StreamX { StreamX() { puts(__FUNCTION__); } ~StreamX() { puts(__FUNCTION__); } }; I get the following output: StreamX 0x7f258c0008c0 ~StreamX StreamX 0x7f25740008c0 ~StreamX StreamX 0x7f25840008c0 ~StreamX StreamX ...



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