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5

EDIT: Turns out this is actually happening due to threading. I've been doing some C# for a good amount of time and you could use Invokes to work around thread problems. Yes. Ifff you need a user-land thread for the asynchronous events then a queued message is your course of action (like C#'s (or Java's etc.) invoke-on-UI-thread). That's hard work. ...


3

Your code is not exception safe. Therefore you're prone to dead lock when you await the join. If you receive the exception while holding the mutex, your code will never unlock the mutex, likely leading to deadlock in the waiting threads. Things to check: First and foremost, your code doesn't show, anywhere, how you create the threads that you try to ...


2

Like T.C. said, you can share your future by calling the share() member function. That way you don't need to move twice: Live On Coliru #include <iostream> #define BOOST_THREAD_PROVIDES_FUTURE #define BOOST_THREAD_PROVIDES_FUTURE_CONTINUATION #define BOOST_THREAD_PROVIDES_FUTURE_WHEN_ALL_WHEN_ANY #include <boost/thread/future.hpp> using ...


2

Yes. The thread didn't exist before-hand so it cannot have "stale" values (e.g. in registers). All writes prior to CreateThread are visible to the new thread. The underlying OS functions act as implied memory barriers (CreateThread e.g.). See also, e.g.: C++ - Should data passed to a thread be volatile? Side note: Consider capturing the connection ...



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