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5

The simplest way is to not use globals. They're bad for exactly the reasons you discovered (and more). As a quick&dirty workaround you can have a extern tpool dbpool(); // function! which in the cpp is implemented as: tpool& dbpool() { static tpool the_instance; // only initialized on first call return the_instance; } That way, as ...


2

Well. That's really quite simple; You're rejecting the tasks posted! template< typename Task > void run_task(task task){ boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lock( mutex_ ); if(0 < available_) { --available_; io_service_.post(boost::bind(&tpool::wrap_task, this, boost::function< void() > ( task ))); } } ...


2

Your "I will probably need to block before the stack goes out of scope" comment clearly identifies the only issue here. The only thing you must make sure is that because the task in your sending thread's stack, it has to stay there until your thread pool executes it. Other than that, there are no issues with using the stack, instead of heap allocation.


2

You have one global dbase object: extern dbase thread; // in h file dbase thread; // in cpp file It's shared between threads, so it has to be thread safe, but it is not. EDIT: If you create dbase object inside the thread function (which is right), remove extern dbase thread; from h file, because you don't have global object anymore, otherwise you'll get ...


1

You are aware that threads do not survive fork(), right? There's no harm in putting the thread allocation into a method you call after fork(). You know, sometimes the constructor isn't the best place to .... make things. Of course, avoiding a global so you can delay the construction until after the fork is fine. You'll probably also want to look into ...


1

In the following line: boost::thread clients_listener = boost::thread(&ServerSocket::clientsListener); You pass the member function pointer but the object to which to apply the pointer is missing. You probably want something like: boost::thread clients_listener = boost::thread(&ServerSocket::clientsListener, this); Also, you do not need to ...


1

st_Request *data; data->id =10; data is uninitialized, you cannot dereference it. Pointers should point to something before you dereference them. I don't understand the point of this function: void XYZ::Create() { mq= new message_queue(open_or_create,"message_queue",100,sizeof(st_Request)); boost:thread workerthread(threadfunc,this); ...



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