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125

1800 INFORMATION is more or less correct, but there are a few issues I wanted to correct. boost::shared_mutex _access; void reader() { boost::shared_lock< boost::shared_mutex > lock(_access); // do work here, without anyone having exclusive access } void conditional_writer() { boost::upgrade_lock< boost::shared_mutex > lock(_access); // ...


73

It looks like you would do something like this: boost::shared_mutex _access; void reader() { // get shared access boost::shared_lock<boost::shared_mutex> lock(_access); // now we have shared access } void writer() { // get upgradable access boost::upgrade_lock<boost::shared_mutex> lock(_access); // get exclusive access ...


72

You can easily build one from a mutex and a condition variable: #include <boost/thread/condition.hpp> #include <boost/thread/mutex.hpp> class semaphore { private: boost::mutex mutex_; boost::condition_variable condition_; unsigned long count_; public: semaphore() : count_() {} void notify() { ...


61

Based on "Maxim Yegorushkin"'s answer, I tried to make the example in C++11 style. #include <mutex> #include <condition_variable> class Semaphore { public: Semaphore (int count_ = 0) : count(count_) {} inline void notify() { std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(mtx); count++; cv.notify_one(); ...


35

You can use boost to create a read-write lock: #include <boost/thread/locks.hpp> #include <boost/thread/shared_mutex.hpp> typedef boost::shared_mutex Lock; typedef boost::unique_lock< Lock > WriteLock; typedef boost::shared_lock< Lock > ReadLock; Lock myLock; void ReadFunction() { ReadLock r_lock(myLock); //Do reader ...


35

The process is pretty simple. First create an asio::io_service and a thread_group. Fill the thread_group with threads linked to the io_service. Assign tasks to the threads using the boost::bind function. To stop the threads (usually when you are exiting your program) just stop the io_service and join all threads. You should only need these headers: ...


33

I know an answer has been accepted, if you need this right now, and you can't be bothered to write your own thread pool, you could try using boost asio io_service with a concurrency hint (i.e. how many threads it should run) and then post() stuff to this io_service... just an idea..


30

Well... The first amusing thing is that the -mt modifier in the name is to indicate the library is Ok for multithreading. Which could lead us to believe that boost_thread (without this modifier) could be multithread-unsafe... But the real thing is that (as seen on my own Ubuntu 10.04 box), boost_thread is a soft link to boost_thread-mt, which means the two ...


30

compile with mt tag i.e -lboost_thread-mt


28

There should be no problem with using boost::shared_ptr as long as you initialize your shared pointers correctly and use the same memory management context for all your shared object libraries. In your case you are trying to use an uninitialized shared pointer. boost::shared_ptr<Obj> obj; obj->Something(); // assertion failed ...


27

boost::thread_group is a convenience class for performing thread management operations on a collection of threads. For example, instead of having to iterate over std::vector<boost::thread>, invoking join() on each thread, the thread_group provides a convenient join_all() member function. With boost::thread, regardless of it being managed by ...


25

In each case you have created two additional threads so you have three (x, y, and main). You'll get a different id on each of the threads including a call in main.


24

but do threading library even need to worry about the allocation of threads to cores. isn't this a job of operating system? So what is the real Benifit of using TBB over Boost? You are right, a threading library usually should not care about mapping threads to cores. And TBB does not. TBB operates with tasks, not threads. TBB's scheduler utilizes all ...


23

The following code boost::bind( &clientTCP::run , this ) defines a function callback. It calls the function run on the current instance (this). With boost::bind you can do the following: // Pass pMyParameter through to the run() function boost::bind(&clientTCP::run, this, pMyParameter) See the documentation and example here: ...


23

A mutex is a synchronization object. You acquire a lock on a mutex at the beginning of a section of code, and release it at the end, in order to ensure that no other thread is accessing the same data at the same time. A mutex typically has a lifetime equal to that of the data it is protecting, and that one mutex is accessed by multiple threads. A lock ...


21

I think it is still not accepted into Boost, but a good staring point: threadpool. Some example of usage, from the web site: #include "threadpool.hpp" using namespace boost::threadpool; // Some example tasks void first_task() { ... } void second_task() { ... } void third_task() { ... } void execute_with_threadpool() { // Create a thread pool. ...


21

If you don't need a handle to your threads, try using thread_group::create_thread() which alleviates the need to manage the thread at all: // Snip: Same as previous examples int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { using namespace std; // launch three threads for ( int i = 0; i < 3; ++i ) g.create_thread( boost::bind( threaded_function, ...


21

When you look at "size overhead" for any type of synchronization primitive, keep in mind that these cannot be packed too closely. That is so because e.g. two mutexes sharing a cacheline would end up in cache trashing (false sharing) if they're in-use concurrently, even if the users acquiring these locks never "conflict". I.e. imagine two threads running two ...


21

For using boost::thread::interrupt(), you have to use boost::thread::sleep() for it to work. A running thread can be interrupted by invoking the interrupt() member function of the corresponding boost::thread object. When the interrupted thread next executes one of the specified interruption points (or if it is currently blocked whilst executing ...


21

I was a little saddened by the C++11 version here, so I wrote a more generic/fleshed out one: #include <mutex> #include <condition_variable> class semaphore { public: using native_handle_type = std::condition_variable::native_handle_type; explicit semaphore(size_t n = 0); semaphore(const semaphore&) = delete; ...


20

This is one way of implementing a very simple semaphore using Boost.Thread. It's an inter-thread semaphore, not an interprocess one. No warranties implied, etc. - I haven't even compiled the code. It illustrates how mutexes and condition variables interact, and assumes a reasonably recent version of Boost. Notice how the mutex and condition variable are ...


20

The reason is largely historical. boost::thread came first. The proposals for std::thread were derived from boost::thread and originally had the behavior that boost::thread does now. However during the standardization process a significant number of people wanted std::thread::~thread() to join() in the destructor if not already joined, instead of ...


20

You have to use std::string since it's in the std namespace.


19

I think you problem is caused by the thread_group destructor which is called when your program exits. Thread group wants to take responsibility of destructing your thread objects. See also in the boost::thread_group documentation. You are creating your thread objects on the stack as local variables in the scope of your main function. Thus, they have already ...


19

No, there's nothing directly equivalent to boost::thread_group in C++11. You could use a std::vector<std::thread> if all you want is a container. You can then use either the new for syntax or std::for_each to call join() on each element, or whatever.


18

The boost::thread object's lifetime and the native thread's lifetime are unrelated. The boost::thread object can go out of scope at any time. From the boost::thread class documentation Just as the lifetime of a file may be different from the lifetime of an iostream object which represents the file, the lifetime of a thread of execution may be different ...


17

boost::this_thread::sleep will sleep the current thread. Only the thread itself can get to sleep. If you want to make a thread sleep, add some check code in the thread or use interruptions. UPDATE: if you use a c++11 compiler with the up to date standard library, you'll have access to std::this_thread::sleep_for and std::this_thread::sleep_until functions. ...


17

I'm not aware of any way to pause a thread at an arbitrary point using boost::thread, however, the situtation you've described can be implemented using a boolean, mutex and condition variable. bool m_pause; // initialise to false in constructor! boost::mutex m_pause_mutex; boost::condition_variable m_pause_changed; void block_while_paused() { ...


16

Many boost libraries are fully implemented in header files. Boost.thread is not. It seems that it is not linking in the boost thread library. Check your linker search paths. Or, as the Stargazer712's comment on the OP says, check the installation. You should see something like libboost_thread-gcc-xxx-1_nn.o in your lib directory. If so, try referencing ...


16

Actually, I finally found a link with full example here. With a bit of adapting, this seems to be the call. boost::system_time const timeout=boost::get_system_time()+ boost::posix_time::milliseconds(35000); boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(the_mutex); if(the_condition_variable.timed_wait(lock,timeout,&CondFulfilled)) { <cond fulfilled code> } ...



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