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5

There are data races on future_shared_state::value and future_shared_state::error, set_value and set_exception access them without acquiring the mutex that wait uses to guard them. The actual problem you are experiencing is due to your use of boost::mutex::scoped_lock in the callers of future_shared_state::wait: you successfully avoid locking the mutex ...


5

The simplest way is to not use globals. They're bad for exactly the reasons you discovered (and more). As a quick&dirty workaround you can have a extern tpool dbpool(); // function! which in the cpp is implemented as: tpool& dbpool() { static tpool the_instance; // only initialized on first call return the_instance; } That way, as ...


5

for( unsigned int i = threads.size()-1; i > 0; i-- ) delete threads[i]; You never delete threads[0]. The for loop condition is incorrect as i never becomes 0 inside the loop body. Also, you don't need reverse iteration here, as you are not removing the actual elements. Thus for( auto & x : threads ) delete x; suffices. Secondly you ...


4

You should define #define BOOST_THREAD_VERSION 4 or #define BOOST_THREAD_PROVIDES_FUTURE_CONTINUATION


4

Use interrupt(). Also, you should define interruption points. Thread will be interrupted after calling interrupt() as soon as it reaches one of interruption points. u.interrupt(); More info: Calling interrupt() just sets a flag in the thread management structure for that thread and returns: it doesn't wait for the thread to actually be interrupted. ...


4

In a nutshell, m_generation is needed to deal with spurious wakeups. The generation counter is used in conjunction with the condition variable to signal to all threads waiting on the barrier that they are free to proceed: Once there are m_threshold threads that have reached the barrier, its generation number gets bumped up, and the condition variable is ...


4

Your data race is here: while(runRxThread){ this->rxImage(); } You don't check runTxThread() for the duration of the loop (not to mention that unless runRxThread is marked volatile, it might not even be read from main memory, but "assumed" unchanged in a register. (NOTE even with volatile the race is there I was merely pointing out the compiler ...


4

If your different threads only read values of global variables, there will be no problem. If more than one thread tries to update same variable (example read, add 1 write), then you must use a synchronization system to ensure that the value cannot be modified between the read and the write. If only one thread writes while others read, it depends. If the ...


3

can I define the timer at class level and reuse it during the entire running session of the application? Yes, you can re-use the timer, i.e. call expires_from_now() and async_wait() again (but read the reference to understand their behavior!). does that async_wait() call will result in a new thread in the background? if yes, is that possible to ...


3

Well. That's really quite simple; You're rejecting the tasks posted! template< typename Task > void run_task(task task){ boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lock( mutex_ ); if(0 < available_) { --available_; io_service_.post(boost::bind(&tpool::wrap_task, this, boost::function< void() > ( task ))); } } ...


3

You try to use QThread subclass, but you said that you want to use C++11 thread so use this: #include <thread> #include <QDebug> #include <QApplication> #include <iostream> void foo() { std::cout << "This string from thread!"<<endl; //while(true) //{ // qDebug() <<"works"; // Sleep(500); ...


3

This is wrong: // this->navPtr is a pointer to the boost::thread for later management this->navPtr = &navThread; You're taking the address of a local variable there. That's Undefined Behaviour if you use navPtr later on. Instead, just store the thread in a member: see sample below. However, I'm doubtful about this because it would ...


3

When accessing mutable shared data from two threads, you need to protect against data races. It does not matter how simple your problem might look like, you cannot guarantee correctness of your code if it has a data race. A typical solution is using a mutex or the like to ensure that only one thread accesses the shared state at the same time. You wouldn't ...


3

The good news is that your program is correct. All the races being reported by valgrind are false positives (although do consider unlocking the mutex before you join the thread - it could save you a headache later). I have OSX10.10 so had to build valgrind from latest trunk in order to try this. Here's what it gave me (truncated output below) I rewrote ...


3

No that won't help. The atomic only makes stores/loads of the pointer indivisible. When you dereference it, you're just accessing the deadline_timer directly, unsynchronized. So you can either just traditional thread synchronization around all accesses to the deadline timer (e.g. using a mutex) use an Asio strand to create a 'logical' thread of ...


3

This appears to be Boost bug 8596, fixed in Boost 1.54. Briefly, in C++11 mode, boost::packaged_task's constructor is broken when passed an lvalue, storing a reference (!) instead of a copy. The functor is taken by forwarding reference, meaning that the template parameter was deduced to be an lvalue reference when an lvalue is passed. The code apparently ...


3

The simple answer is yes. Once variables are starting to be shared amongs multiple threads for both reading and writing you will need some kind of protection. There are different flavours to achieve this : Semaphores, locks, mutex, events, critical section message queues. Especially when your globals are references things can become ugly. Suppose you have ...


3

ยง1.10 [intro.multithread] (quoting N4140): 6 Two expression evaluations conflict if one of them modifies a memory location (1.7) and the other one accesses or modifies the same memory location. 23 Two actions are potentially concurrent if they are performed by different threads, or they are unsequenced, and at least one is performed by ...


2

Your program simply has a race, most probably due to the fact that 1 nanosecond is awfully short. try_join_for is implemented by calling try_join_until, a function that will attempt joining until a certain timepoint has been reached: // I stripped some unrelated template stuff from the code // to make it more readable bool try_join_for(const ...


2

You are probably doing using namespace std; somewhere, and std::swap is a thing. I suggest you simply rename your swap function to something else.


2

If you look at the documentation, boost::timed_mutex::scoped_lock is just an alias for boost::unique_lock<timed_mutex>: class timed_mutex: boost::noncopyable { public: // ... typedef unique_lock<timed_mutex> scoped_timed_lock; typedef unspecified-type scoped_try_lock; typedef scoped_timed_lock scoped_lock; // ... }; ...


2

Assuming both the asio and your application are written correctly so the only blocking operation is inside the event dispatch loop, why would you need more threads than available HW resources? I.e. if the threads do not block than oversubscription will not bring you any performance improvement. Thus, you can create a thread pool of fixed size or just use ...


2

Yes, you can do that, but you must ensure that the call to set_value() does not conflict with anything in the other thread, such as the completion of the constructor or the start of the destructor. (According to the C++ standard you cannot even make potentially concurrent calls to set_value() and get_future() but that is a defect and should get fixed.) To ...


2

yes, this is the cause, you need to rebuild boost based on your new compiler VS 2010.


2

On Windows: TerminateThread(u.native_handle(), 0); On Linux / QNX / UNIX / any platform with pthread support: pthread_cancel(u.native_handle()); or pthread_kill(u.native_handle(), 9); Note that boost authors intentionally left this out as the behaviour is platform-dependent and not well defined. However, you're not the only one to ever reach for ...


2

Your "I will probably need to block before the stack goes out of scope" comment clearly identifies the only issue here. The only thing you must make sure is that because the task in your sending thread's stack, it has to stay there until your thread pool executes it. Other than that, there are no issues with using the stack, instead of heap allocation.


2

You have one global dbase object: extern dbase thread; // in h file dbase thread; // in cpp file It's shared between threads, so it has to be thread safe, but it is not. EDIT: If you create dbase object inside the thread function (which is right), remove extern dbase thread; from h file, because you don't have global object anymore, otherwise you'll get ...


2

The problem is that SomeCallback is not static (at least not that I can see), so there is another this unaccounted for in thread's constructor. Further, because it's not static, you can't convert SomeCallback to the void(*)(void) that ProcessSomething requires. The simplest fix would just be to make SomeCallback static (and change &this->SomeCallback ...


2

In the following line: boost::thread clients_listener = boost::thread(&ServerSocket::clientsListener); You pass the member function pointer but the object to which to apply the pointer is missing. You probably want something like: boost::thread clients_listener = boost::thread(&ServerSocket::clientsListener, this); Also, you do not need to ...


2

You are aware that threads do not survive fork(), right? There's no harm in putting the thread allocation into a method you call after fork(). You know, sometimes the constructor isn't the best place to .... make things. Of course, avoiding a global so you can delay the construction until after the fork is fine. You'll probably also want to look into ...



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