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It's unusual to preempt the main thread in whatever it was doing to start working on the callback. Even in "thread handling in C#" (which is quite a broad subject) the main thread will typically process callbacks when it is processing the thread's message queue. So typically, the main thread only executes callbacks when it is ready to do so. One way of ...


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IMHO, the 1st idea is good and the problems are artifical. As already written the std::atomic or boost::atomic solves the 1st problem. The 2nd problem is solved by incrementing the reference count before the thread constructor call and proper exception and error handling in between these two lines (i.e. producer_count++ and c'tor call). The 3rd problem. ...


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thread_ = boost::thread( boost::function< void (void)>( boost::bind( &clientTCP::run , this ) ) ); The bind and the function are unnecessary, and make the code slower and use more memory. Just do: thread_ = boost::thread( &clientTCP::run , this ); To add an argument just add an argument: thread_ = boost::thread( &clientTCP::run , ...


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If you use C++11, you can use lambdas: #include <iostream> #include <thread> class Foo { public: void foo() { std::cout << "Foo thread: " << std::this_thread::get_id() << std::endl; } }; int main() { std::cout << "Main thred: " << std::this_thread::get_id() << std::endl; Foo foo; ...


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Here's an example: boost::thread _commandControl(&Client::commandControl, &client); This create a new thread, using the client object method commandControl, from the Client instance named client. and here a bit larger piece of the code, might be easier to understand: Client client(host, port); std::cout << "Pick interface (1) ...


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You can also check out cpp11-on-multicore - it has a portable and optimal semaphore implementation. The repository also contains other threading goodies that complement c++11 threading.



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