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1

With thread.join() you can have timed wait. So you can decide how long to wait which is not the case in normal function call. Some other thread can interrupt the waiting thread. thread.join() apparently looks like putting function executions in sequence but technically there are two different threads involved here. So thread local objects/resources are ...


2

it will block when you call .join. between the creation of the thread and thread.join you can invoke many function. diagrammatically it looks like this: main-thread | new thread() ---- | | | f'() f1() | | | f2() | | f''() f3() | | | thread.join -----


0

If you are spinning off a thread only to instantly join it, you shouldn't be using threads. The benefit of using threads is that you can let the thread do its job, go off and do some more processing, then call join when you actually need the result.


1

What you're looking for is the parameter pack operator. Using this it's possible to write a function that accepts a variable number of arguments. It can do things with those arguments, such as forward them to another function. Keep in mind that because templates are instantiated at compile time, the number of arguments and their types must be known at the ...


0

You can "reset" a promise by assigning it to a blank promise. myPromise = promise< int >(); A more complete example: promise< int > myPromise; void writer() { for( int i = 0; i < 10; ++i ) { cout << "Setting promise.\n"; myPromise.set_value( i ); myPromise = promise< int >{}; // Reset the ...


0

This actually points to a race condition between writer thread and reader thread. The places where we access/write the global variable would be the critical sections of the code. Ideally we must synchronize between the read/write threads whenever we operate in the critical sections or else we may see unspecific behavior in the code. Your problem is similar ...


0

Yes. No. Maybe. The formally correct answer is: This is not safe. The practical answer is not that easy. It's something like "This is safe, kind of, under some conditions". Reads (any number of them) in absence of concurrent writes are always safe. Reads (even a single one) in presence of concurrent writes (even a single one) are formally never safe, but ...


3

ยง1.10 [intro.multithread] (quoting N4140): 6 Two expression evaluations conflict if one of them modifies a memory location (1.7) and the other one accesses or modifies the same memory location. 23 Two actions are potentially concurrent if they are performed by different threads, or they are unsequenced, and at least one is performed by ...


4

If your different threads only read values of global variables, there will be no problem. If more than one thread tries to update same variable (example read, add 1 write), then you must use a synchronization system to ensure that the value cannot be modified between the read and the write. If only one thread writes while others read, it depends. If the ...


-1

Concurrent writes are not safe. Concurrent read and write are always safe (assuming atomic writes), but you never know whether you've read the value before or after write. Main thread behaves just the same as spawned threads, there's no difference at all. So, for concurrent write you'll need mutexes.


1

This really depends on a number of factors but is generally a bad idea and can lead to race conditions. You can avoid this by locking the value so that reads and writes are all atomic and thus can't collide.


3

The simple answer is yes. Once variables are starting to be shared amongs multiple threads for both reading and writing you will need some kind of protection. There are different flavours to achieve this : Semaphores, locks, mutex, events, critical section message queues. Especially when your globals are references things can become ugly. Suppose you have ...


3

This appears to be Boost bug 8596, fixed in Boost 1.54. Briefly, in C++11 mode, boost::packaged_task's constructor is broken when passed an lvalue, storing a reference (!) instead of a copy. The functor is taken by forwarding reference, meaning that the template parameter was deduced to be an lvalue reference when an lvalue is passed. The code apparently ...


1

Yes this will work. In particular Basically I am not sure if the future associated with the packaged_task can be considered ready when the readers are notified by the function registered with boost::this_thread::at_thread_exit They can. The packaged_task is the thread function. By the time the thread_proxy implementation from Boost Thread executes the ...


1

You're running 10 threads and there is no synchronization of access to eodTimer. The deadline_timer object is not threadsafe, so you get Undefined Behaviour because of the data race. Did you mean to run the timer on a strand?


0

Sorry!!! I found the mistake done by me! this code is working properly! i called boost::thread with the object "methods" instead of the object to the class "aa".



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