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I tried to change the @sehe answer, so it solve exactly the problem which I am looking for and I achieved this code: #include <boost/atomic.hpp> #include <boost/thread.hpp> #include <boost/bind.hpp> #include <iostream> #include <vector> namespace /*static*/ { boost::atomic<int> data; boost::barrier* ...


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@sehe even with barrier, it stuck in deadlock. – mmostajab 5 mins ago Since youdon't show anything about what you're doing there, let me give you a startup boost by incorporating a large chunk of all the suggestions you received: Live On Coliru #include <boost/atomic.hpp> #include <boost/thread.hpp> #include <boost/bind.hpp> ...


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You have race condition - setting flag and notifying slave threads is not atomic. So you just have to lock data_ready_mutex before you are modifying data_ready flag in main thread. This will eliminate race condition, slave thread either will see data_ready false and go to wait on condition variable and will be notified, or it will acquire mutex lock only ...


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Is this expected behavior? Yes and no. You shouldn't have any expectations about which thread will get a mutex, since it's unspecified. But it's certainly within the range of expected behavior. Is there a way to control this behavior, such as making scoped locks behave like locking operations are queued? Don't use mutexes this way. Just don't. Use ...


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Why are you surprised, exactly ? If you were expecting thread 2 to acquire the mutex while thread 1 is asleep, then, yes, this is expecting behaviour and your understanding was wrong, because your lock is in scope. But if you are surprised because of lack of alternance between thread 1 and thread 2 at the end of loop iteration, then you can have a look at ...


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So, after I haven given some thought to this issue, I have come up with such a solution: void accumulateTLS(size_t idxThread){ if (idxThread == nr_threads) // Suspend all the threads till all of them are called and waiting here { busy = true; } boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lock(mut); while (!busy) { ...


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You need to capture io_service by reference to get the above code snippet to compile: void start_thread(boost::asio::io_service &io_service) { boost::thread tcp_thread( [&io_service]() { // <-- you missed a & here io_service.run(); } ); } Note that the io_service does not implement copy semantics.


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boost::lock_guard<boost::mutex> lock(task_received_mutex); task_received = true; Okay, the task_received_mutex protects task_received. boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> start_lock(task_start_mutex); while (!task_received){ task_start_condition.wait(start_lock); } Oops, we're reading task_received without holding the mutex ...


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As a starter, signal the task_start_condition under the task_start_mutex lock. Consider locking that mutex during thread creation to avoid obvious races. Third: it seems you have several mutexes named for "logical tasks" (draw, start). In reality, however, mutexes guard resources, not "logical tasks". So it's good practice to name them after the shared ...


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I was struggling with this as well. The trick seems to be two-fold. You need to use a different toolset to build the i386 .dylib. clang will build an x86_64 .dylib no matter what I tried, but darwin with the right flags will build an i386 .dylib Build twice, once for i386, once for x86_64; then use lipo to combine the result into a "fat" .dylib Here's ...


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Locks can provide mutual exclusion but not condition synchronization.Unlike a semaphore, a lock has an owner, and ownership plays an important role in the behavior of a lock example - class lockableObject { public void F() { mutex.lock(); ...; mutex.unlock(); } public void G() { mutex.lock(); ...; F(); ...; mutex.unlock(); } private mutexLock mutex; } // ...


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You're misunderstanding what bind does. It binds arguments. I.e. It can turn Foo(x,y) into Foo(3,y) by binding x=3. You don't bind return values. Instead, what you need is a lambda: [&RT, i](){RT = Class::CalculateRT(i, i - 1) Of course, if CalculateRT is a non-static method, then you need a Class object from somewhere. To use: TransformType RT; auto ...


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Class::CalculateRT(i, i - 1) is a function call, and you try to take address of call itself... try something like: boost::bind(&Class::CalculateRT, i, i - 1) (address to bind to, arguments follow). boost::ref(i) might be needed if you want it to return different values for different i. Is this static method? Then it needs value for this in bind. RT ...


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I changed this chunk of code: t0 = boost::thread(boost::bind(&B::live, b)); t1 = boost::thread(boost::bind(&C::live, c)); to: t0 = boost::thread(std::bind(&B::live, &b)); t1 = boost::thread(std::bind(&C::live, &c)); Probably if you don't use a pointer to object, it will make a copy of that object and then run the thread.



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