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Assuming that you mean ev_run for your boost::thread, here's what you can do: Setup an ev_async In the callback of ev_async call ev_break. Call ev_async_send from RedisSubscriber::Stop(). ev_async watchers are thread-safe -- it uses memory barriers for synchronising between threads. This will cause the event loop to stop, and m_thread.join() will return. ...


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yes, this is the cause, you need to rebuild boost based on your new compiler VS 2010.


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For stop your thread you can use: my_thread.interrupt(); in order this to work you have to set an interruption point at the point you want the thread's function stops when you interrupt. Note: the interruption by it self don't stop the thread it just set a flag and the when an interruption point is reached the thread is interrupted. If no interruption ...


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This is a known bug in Boost 1.48 that appears to have been fixed in 1.49 according to their bug tracker. There is an ambiguity if Boost.Move, which emulates C++11 move semantics, is used with Boost.Thread, which comes with its own move semantics emulators. Considering that Boost 1.48 was released more than 2.5 years ago (in November 2011), you should ...


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Yes, each call will be received by different (thread local) objects.


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I'll try to answer your questions: as you can read in this Document, locks are used as RAII devices for the locked state of a mutex. That is, the locks don't own the mutexes they reference. They just own the lock on the mutex. basically what it means is that you acquire the mutex lock when you initialize it's corresponding lock and release it when the ...



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