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2

The difference seems to be the fact that the std::thread implementation does an _fpreset(), while boost::thread obviously doesn't. If you change the line namespace boost { void tss_cleanup_implemented() { } } to (formatted a little for clarity): namespace boost { void tss_cleanup_implemented() { _fpreset(); } } You will see ...


4

This isn't a difference between 64 and 53 bit precision FPU calculations, it is a difference in ROUNDING. The only difference between the two results is in the least significant bit of the answer. It looks like boost's thread start code is not properly initializing the FPU flags, and the default rounding mode is down or chop, rather than nearest. If this ...


1

To whit, you need a better compiler. This seems to happen because boost::thread is by default using 53-bit internal precision for floating point math, while the main thread is using 64-bit precision. If status of FPU unit is reset with _fpreset() after the boost::thread has been created, the result is the same as in the main thread. This is insane. ...


5

This: *reinterpret_cast<unsigned long long*>(&v) is undefined behaviour as v is not unsigned_long_long. If you want to copy the binary representation of a double to an integral type, use memcpy(). Note that, even with memcpy(), it's implementation defined how the binary representation will look like, but you're guaranteed that you can 'load back ...


0

To paraphrase the problem (let me know if I've misunderstood): you've got two event handlers (A and B) that will be executed, and it's not guaranteed which one will be executed first -- the execution ordering might be (A,B) or it might be (B,A)... but in either case you'd like the system to behave as if the handlers had been executed in (A,B) order. The ...


0

It seems like you need to specify an order or priority of execution. From your question it also seems like you have heterogenous threads (in terms of behavior) so I am going to suggest synchronization. A mutex alone will likely not be enough (although in many implementations a mutex is the same as a binary semaphore). An easy way to do this is with ...



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