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Also can be useful RAII semaphore wrapper in threads: class AutoSemaphore : boost::noncopyable { public: AutoSemaphore(Semaphore& sem) : m_Semaphore(sem) { m_Semaphore.Wait(); } ~AutoSemaphore() { m_Semaphore.Notify(); } private: AutoSemaphore& operator=(const AutoSemaphore&) {} private: Semaphore& m_Semaphore; }; Usage ...


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The thread object is being destroyed before allowing the io_service to completely run. The thread destructor documentation states: [...] the programmer must ensure that the destructor is never executed while the thread is still joinable. If BOOST_THREAD_PROVIDES_THREAD_DESTRUCTOR_CALLS_TERMINATE_IF_JOINABLE is defined, the program would abort as the ...


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io_service::run() will complete all outstanding tasks and return when complete. If you don't call it, it will do nothing. If you do something like this: boost::asio::io_service::work work(io); Another thread will do this for you and run until you stop it one way or another.


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I know you like code. My Version namespace bamthread { typedef std::unique_ptr<boost::asio::io_service::work> asio_worker; struct ThreadPool { ThreadPool(size_t threads) :service(), working(new asio_worker::element_type(service)) { while(threads--) { auto worker = ...


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I don't have an answer for your question, but I do have some information that i think is interesting but will not fit into a comment. First, I was able to reproduce your problem with MinGW 4.8.1 running on Win7 x64 with the program built as a 32-bit x86 process (I'm not saying that an x64 build didn't repro the problem; I didn't try x64 because my MinGW ...


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The quick fix: Clean out boost and run bjam again with link=static The explanation for anyone that stumbles on this, here's what the problem was: I had build the entire boost package with its default config. That, however, for whatever reason does not include the static libs for system and thread. Running bjam after that sith link=static did infact build ...


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Answer: You are calling detach() on the thread objects. This detaches the real underlying thread (and its stack) from the boost thread, leaving it undeleted at the point of ->delete() being called. If you have c++11, why use boost threads at all? std::thread is movable so works in a vector without new/delete. another iteration of the above minimal example: ...


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for( unsigned int i = threads.size()-1; i > 0; i-- ) delete threads[i]; You never delete threads[0]. The for loop condition is incorrect as i never becomes 0 inside the loop body. Also, you don't need reverse iteration here, as you are not removing the actual elements. Thus for( auto & x : threads ) delete x; suffices. Secondly you ...


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In a nutshell, m_generation is needed to deal with spurious wakeups. The generation counter is used in conjunction with the condition variable to signal to all threads waiting on the barrier that they are free to proceed: Once there are m_threshold threads that have reached the barrier, its generation number gets bumped up, and the condition variable is ...


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Have you tried it? See it Live On Coliru #include <boost/thread.hpp> #include <iostream> using namespace boost; int main() { thread t([]{ int i = 0; while (true) try { if (i >= 10) return; while (i < 10) { this_thread::sleep_for(chrono::milliseconds(200)); ...



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