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1

In your signal handler, you are calling exit(-1). exit(-1) is not asynchronous signal-handler safe. Use _exit(-1) instead. The difference between the two functions is that exit() calls all of the registered atexit() routines (including C++ static destructors). Before exit() does that shutdown step, it uses pthread_mutex_lock() to ensure a thread-safe ...


1

The signals need to be blocked in every thread. The safest way to do this is to block them in the first thread before any others are created. Then a single, specially chosen thread can call sigsuspend() and only that thread will execute the signal handlers. void *signal_handling_thread(void *whatever) { sig_value := 0 while (sig_value not in (SIGTERM, ...


5

There are data races on future_shared_state::value and future_shared_state::error, set_value and set_exception access them without acquiring the mutex that wait uses to guard them. The actual problem you are experiencing is due to your use of boost::mutex::scoped_lock in the callers of future_shared_state::wait: you successfully avoid locking the mutex ...


0

What is wrong with just calling .join()? If you insist you can check before you join: #include <boost/chrono.hpp> #include <boost/thread.hpp> #include <iostream> int main() { boost::thread thd([]{ std::cout << "str\n"; }); boost::this_thread::sleep_for(boost::chrono::seconds(3)); if (thd.joinable()) thd.join(); } ...


2

Your program simply has a race, most probably due to the fact that 1 nanosecond is awfully short. try_join_for is implemented by calling try_join_until, a function that will attempt joining until a certain timepoint has been reached: // I stripped some unrelated template stuff from the code // to make it more readable bool try_join_for(const ...


1

The joy is that your threads are actually terminating asynchronously, destructing the StreamX instances. Using a detector: struct StreamX { StreamX() { puts(__FUNCTION__); } ~StreamX() { puts(__FUNCTION__); } }; I get the following output: StreamX 0x7f258c0008c0 ~StreamX StreamX 0x7f25740008c0 ~StreamX StreamX 0x7f25840008c0 ~StreamX StreamX ...


0

I had a similar situation. mfc dialog with boost threads. to solve I added signals2 to the boost thread and bound them to member functions on the dialog. as the signals entered the dialog member functions I checked the thread id. if the thread id was not the same as the dialog thread id I pushed a boost function onto a std::queue of function (same ...


0

Sorry I comment this here, but I have no enough reputation for adding a comment. @FrankH, cache trashing is not a good justification to make a data structure bigger. There are cache lines that can even have 128 bytes of size, it doesn't mean that a mutex must be so big. I think programmers must be warned to separate synchronization objects in memory so ...


1

If I understand you correctly, you need to fix last lines on your loop (see comments for descriptions): // io_service.stop(); // threads.join_all(); work.reset(); // <- signal to process all pending jobs and quit from io_service::run function threads.join_all(); // <- wait for all threads io_service.reset(); // <- now `io_service` can accept new ...


0

Just check time in worker thread and you won't need a separate timeout thread: void WorkerThread() { DWORD nStartTime = GetTickCount(); while(boost::this_thread::interruption_requested() == false && GetTickCount() - nStartTime < 15000) { printf("."); } } BTW, please note 15000, because GetTickCount() units are ...


1

You could use a sleep: #include <boost/thread.hpp> struct MyClass { boost::thread timeoutThread; boost::thread workerThread; void TimeoutThread() { boost::this_thread::sleep_for(boost::chrono::milliseconds(15)); workerThread.interrupt(); } void WorkerThread() { ...


0

I'm embarrassed to say that I was measuring the CPU time of my program and not the WALL time. WALL time clearly shows my program is ~50% faster when it is threaded. The CPU time of the threaded program is actually higher by ~7% because it adds the work done by the 3 cores in the CPU (I presume) with extra overhead from managing the threads.



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