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3

No that won't help. The atomic only makes stores/loads of the pointer indivisible. When you dereference it, you're just accessing the deadline_timer directly, unsynchronized. So you can either just traditional thread synchronization around all accesses to the deadline timer (e.g. using a mutex) use an Asio strand to create a 'logical' thread of ...


1

I need to say thread interruption has never been a "reliable" feature on almost all platforms. You'd better to re-design if your program depends on it.


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I had a similar problem with centos 6.5 when compiling povray 3.7 and this solved it - just add -lboost_thread-mt in your Makefile.


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Fixed, apparntly all the building and building damaged my boost install. Removed every trace of boost from my computer. Reinstalled it by doing the following steps: going to the boost dir using vs developer command line tools shortcut bootstrap b2 bjam toolset=msvc-11.0 --build-type=complete --with-thread --with-chrono -- with-date_time ...


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I was a little saddened by the C++11 version here, so I wrote a more generic one: #include <mutex> #include <condition_variable> class semaphore { public: using native_handle_type = std::condition_variable::native_handle_type; explicit semaphore(size_t n = 0) : count{n} {} semaphore(const semaphore&) = delete; ...


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Since you say you can't change xxx, call another function which puts the result somewhere accessible. A promise is probably still the best option, but you could write it directly to a local variable if you're careful with synchronisation. For example int result; th = boost::thread([&]{result = xxx();}); // Careful! result will be modified by the ...


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Actually i want to change something in main & the method xxx() is not editable Use a shared object with suitable synchronization (mutex, mutex+condition variable) A sampler of the options I mentioned (you don't need all of them, obviously): int global = -1; std::mutex mtx; std::condition_variable cv; void xxx() { // do lot of work... { ...


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That's an operation system specific function, and completely unrelated to threading. It's related to power management. You could run /a/ background thread that does this in a loop, though: void background_thread() { while (true) { boost::this_thread::sleep_for(boost::chrono::seconds(30)); ::SetThreadExecutionState(...); // ...



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