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You have raw pointer and do not have copy ctor or assignment operator defined for class RvizPlotter, see rule of three. And you initialize it with this statement: UR5::UR5(ros::NodeHandle &n){ rvizPlotter = RvizPlotter(n); } you should probably replace it with: UR5::UR5(ros::NodeHandle &n) : rvizPlotter( n ) { } and also disable or properly ...


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It is native threads, namely, it will use platform threads, at least in Linux, Windows and Mac. As far as I know, the thread mapping is going to be 1:1 with a kernel thread in Windows, Linux and MAC for each spawned thread. I am not sure if for other platforms it could be implemented in other ways, but I don't know of any non-kernel thread implemenation ...


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Well I figured out the issue was related to the fact that the io_service variable was being released on scope change, and hell was breaking loose. To fix this, I changed my setupServer to this: io_service = new boost::asio::io_service(); rankingServer = new tcp_server(*io_service, serverPort); io_service->run(); and declaring the variable elsewhere in ...


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It sounds like you are calling server->write("Some Text") from the main thread. However, at the time point, no client might be connected so far so that you possibly try to write on a socket with no connected endpoint. It might even be the case that the io_service thread has not even started yet. When writing asynchronous programs with boost asio, you ...


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tbb library provides both blocking and non-blocking queues: tbb::concurrent_queue<> provides non-blocking try_pop() and push() for unlimited growth. tbb::concurrent_bounded_queue<> provides push() which can block if capacity limit is specified and when it is reached; and pop() which waits for items in empty queue. It also provides non-blocking ...


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On Windows: TerminateThread(u.native_handle(), 0); On Linux / QNX / UNIX / any platform with pthread support: pthread_cancel(u.native_handle()); or pthread_kill(u.native_handle(), 9); Note that boost authors intentionally left this out as the behaviour is platform-dependent and not well defined. However, you're not the only one to ever reach for ...


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You should use boost::get_system_time(), there are quite a few examples with it. Though I can't find the authoritative source, I use microsec_clock exactly as you do and get similar problems. Just discovered the bug though, will update when I'll test the fix. Usage of boost::unique_lock::timed_lock


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Rather than re-invent the wheel, the easiest thing to do is to get boost from somewhere like Homebrew or MacPorts. E.g. first install Homebrew: $ ruby -e "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.github.com/Homebrew/homebrew/go/install)" and then just: $ sudo brew install boost and you're good to go.


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The code as shown is completely MT-unsafe as there is no synchronization between main thread (which presumably accesses m_intValue as well) and the worker thread, in context of which your callback is executing. This can be fixed by using a critical section or a mutex to protect access to it. If your real code uses any wxWidgets UI functionality from the ...


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I am guessing that it is problematical to have WorkerThread and CallBack as methods of your MainFrame. wxWidgets does not like running GUI code in a worker thread. While the posted code looks harmless, I wonder what you have in the real code ... ? I suggest moving WorkerThread and CallBack into a new clas that does NOT inherit from any wx class - this ...


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On Linux I am able to get thread id using boost::this_thread::get_id() #include <iostream> #include <boost/thread.hpp> void func(){ std::cout<<"Thrd Id "<<boost::this_thread::get_id()<<" "<<std::endl; } int main(){ boost::thread thd1(&func); std::cout<<std::endl; boost::thread thd2(&func); ...


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On most unixoids pid_t current_thread_id = gettid(); will return the current thread id, but glibc does not provide this function. Instead you have to call: pid_t current_thread_id = (pid_t) syscall(__NR_gettid); Getting the id from outside that thread will become difficult. Using the native handle of pthread is an unsupported way of getting thread ids. ...


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The easiest solution is to call getpid() directly from the thread getpid(). (Please do not forget, that in Linux process and thread is almost the same, thus you need the process ID).


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You have to shuytdown and destroy the ORB during the regular shutdown of the application, doing it in the destructor of a static object is really too late. Add a shutdown() method to your CORBA Controller which does a shutdown and destroy of the ORB.



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