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I am the OP, I have fixed the problem. The issue is clearly not a thread contention issue, as suggested by other users. This is proven in edit 3 of the original question. The terminal output simulates where a mutex would have been locked and released, and proves that they are necessary in this case - as the threads are synchronised over the network. I ...


1

As someone said there was something strange happening behind the scenes and now I found the reason. There is nothing strange in the code in both the boost and the POSIX variant. The gist is that the code was compiled in the testing framework with -fprofile-arcs flag which I use for code coverage (lcov). This flag is instrumenting the program and changing ...


1

I have translated my program to POSIX Threads and now Helgrind is absolutely happy (i.e. does not report any errors). This is my program after translation: #include <pthread.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> ::pthread_mutex_t myMutex; ::pthread_cond_t myConditionVariable; bool functionWasRun = false; void* function(void* ) { ...


3

The good news is that your program is correct. All the races being reported by valgrind are false positives (although do consider unlocking the mutex before you join the thread - it could save you a headache later). I have OSX10.10 so had to build valgrind from latest trunk in order to try this. Here's what it gave me (truncated output below) I rewrote ...


0

In case of concurrency using Mutex locks are good option. You can use the locks in your class's push, pop methods. When you are pushing, popping or accessing data Mutex locks will make sure the thread safety. Let me demonstrate this - Suppose you are accessing the queue while doing an operation, lets assume the queue size is 5. If you lock the block of ...


-2

Could it be the race condition on the myConditionalVariable? If its the case, below will solve the problem. void function() { { boost::lock_guard<boost::mutex> lock(myMutex); functionWasRun = true; myConditionalVariable.notify_one(); } //doSomething1(); } int main() { boost::thread pThread(function); ...


2

My understanding is that two threads can write to the same memory, but not at the same time. Unless you add explicit synchronisation to your code (e.g. using mutexes, semaphores, or atomic operations) you cannot meaningfully say whether two events happen "at the same time" or not. Without synchronisation you cannot say one even happens before the ...


2

The problem is that even if you set runRxThread to false, the thread may still be doing stuff within this->rxImage() and could be accessing the vector. You need to wait for it to finish doing that and check the loop condition again before allowing the main thread to clear the vector. It wouldn't be good to 'clear' the vector while a thread is still ...


4

Your data race is here: while(runRxThread){ this->rxImage(); } You don't check runTxThread() for the duration of the loop (not to mention that unless runRxThread is marked volatile, it might not even be read from main memory, but "assumed" unchanged in a register. (NOTE even with volatile the race is there I was merely pointing out the compiler ...


3

When accessing mutable shared data from two threads, you need to protect against data races. It does not matter how simple your problem might look like, you cannot guarantee correctness of your code if it has a data race. A typical solution is using a mutex or the like to ensure that only one thread accesses the shared state at the same time. You wouldn't ...


1

A (non detached) thread will be joignable, even after having returned from the function it was set to run, until it has been joined. Example: #include <iostream> #include <thread> #include <chrono> using namespace std; void foo(){ std::cout << "helper: I'm done\n"; } int main(){ cout << "starting helper...\n"; ...


0

These two defines below were messing up with my linker, throwing one beautiful "LNK2001: unresolved external symbol" error. Do you have then somewhere in your code? //#define BOOST_FILESYSTEM_NO_DEPRECATED //#define BOOST_FILESYSTEM_NO_LIB


0

Even though there is a public method start_thread in class thread, it isn't in the documentation. That's for a reason: Launching threads A new thread is launched by passing an object of a callable type that can be invoked with no parameters to the constructor. [...] If you wish to construct an instance of boost::thread with a function or ...


1

You shouldn't call start_thread? This is not required, as it's a leaked internal implementation detail: https://svn.boost.org/trac/boost/ticket/9632 In my code I accidentally called this method and it resulted in my callback being started twice. So you get unsynchronized access to std::cout, y which leads to Undefined Behaviour The fix is found in ...


1

Take look at Boost.Thread change log, in particular at issue #7755 "Thread: deadlock with shared_mutex on Windows", which was fixed in 1.54. It might be the issue you encounter. By the way, a lot of Boost.Thread bugs have been fixed since 1.50, so it's worth upgrading to the latest version.


1

You can't ever safely terminate a thread, you just need to tell it from the outside that it should stop. If you interrupt a thread, you don't know where you interrupted it and you could leave the system in an unknown state. Instead of looping forever, you can check a variable (make sure it's thread safe though!) inside the thread's loop to see if the thread ...


0

So, as documentation says: Postcondition: this->size() is increased by one, the new thread is running. after calling this member function your thread is already running. You can do your next stuff right after that.


2

boost::async needs to determine the resultant type of the argument functor's call. In order to do that, Boost uses its own boost::result_of<T> class template implementation. That is, async declaration looks as below: template <class F> boost::future<typename boost::result_of<typename boost::decay<F>::type()>::type> async(F f); ...


3

This is wrong: // this->navPtr is a pointer to the boost::thread for later management this->navPtr = &navThread; You're taking the address of a local variable there. That's Undefined Behaviour if you use navPtr later on. Instead, just store the thread in a member: see sample below. However, I'm doubtful about this because it would ...



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