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6

reserve can be emulated by rehash as in Table 103 in N3376. a.rehash(n) Post: a.bucket_count() > a.size() / a.max_load_factor() and a.bucket_count() >= n. a.reserve(n) Same as a.rehash(ceil(n / a.max_load_factor()))


6

Use boost::unordered_map::find(): boost::unordered_map<std::string, int>::iterator i = m.find("hello"); if (i != m.end()) { std::cout << i->first << "=" << i->second << "\n"; } else { std::cout << "Not found\n"; }


5

std::vector is memory efficient. I don't know about the boost maps, but the Boost people usually know what they're doing, I doubt you'll save a lot of memory by creating your own variants. You can do a few other things to help with memory issues: Compile in 64 bit. Running out of memory in a 64 bit process is very hard. You won't run out of memory, but ...


5

Implement the hash function for it: namespace boost { namespace gregorian { inline size_t hash_value(date const& date) { return boost::hash_value(date.julian_day()); } } } // boost::gregorian julian_day is simply the day index since Julian epoch start (whatever that is).


5

Some implementations of a hash map will reorder the items that hash to the same bin, putting the most recently accessed item at the front of a list, as an optimization. This would change the order. I'm not aware that boost::unordered_map does this, but in the future you might end up substituting std::unordered_map and it will all depend on your compiler's ...


4

The C++11 requires standard library to have std::hash<std::bitset> specialized. IOW it should have hash already. For boost you should use config: #define BOOST_DYNAMIC_BITSET_DONT_USE_FRIENDS then the dynamic_bitset::m_bits member becomes public and you can make hash on it.


4

This is a bit muddled. What you say are not "things that you can do to speed things up"; rather, they are mandatory requirements of your type to be eligible as the element type of an unordered map, and also for an unordered set (which you might rather want). You need to provide an equality operator that compares objects, not hash values. The whole point of ...


4

Try: it != map.end() as the for loop termination condition (instead of it < map.end()).


3

I would start working with ranges, like so: template<typename BoostUnorderedMap, typename Key> boost::iterator_range< typename BoostUnorderedMap::local_iterator > get_bucket_range( BoostUnorderedMap& myMap, Key const& k ) { int bucketIndex = myMap.bucket( k ); return boost::iterator_range< typename ...


3

In case of iterators you must use != operator: boost::unordered_map<std::string, int>::iterator it = map.begin(); for(; it != map.end(); ++it){ cout << map[it->first]; } You cant use < because iterator points to memory, and you cant guarantee that memory is contiguous. That's why you MUST use != compare.


3

Where you find such insert method? std::pair<iterator, bool> insert(value_type const&); std::pair<iterator, bool> insert(value_type&&); iterator insert(const_iterator, value_type const&); iterator insert(const_iterator, value_type&&); template<typename InputIterator> void insert(InputIterator, ...


2

forget about hash; there is nothing (at least from your question) that suggests you have a meaningful key; lets take a step back and rephrase your actual performance goals: you want to quickly validate no duplicates ever exist for any of your State objects comment if i need to add others. From the aforementioned goal, and from your comment i would ...


2

An unordered_map is a hashtable. You don't store the hash; it is done internally as the storage and lookup method. Given your requirements, an unordered_set might be more appropriate, since your object is the only item to store. You are a little confused though -- the equality operator and hash function are not truly performance items, but required for ...


2

Most likely, the key you put in the unordered map contains whitespace (which you don't see when outputting it) and therefore is not found later. In your regex ^(.+)\\s*=\\s*(.+), the first (.+) will greedily match as many characters as possible, including leading and trailing whitespace. The \\s* following it will always match an empty string. To prevent ...


2

Lookup performance should be exactly the same --Boost.Multiindex internal structure does not involve extra indirections as you seem to assume. In any case, when in doubt profile and see by yourself.


2

Here's a fixed up version. I just tried to make it self contained according to the suggestive comments. And it works. Hope it helps anyways: Live On Coliru #include <boost/interprocess/managed_shared_memory.hpp> #include <boost/interprocess/containers/string.hpp> #include <boost/interprocess/containers/map.hpp> #include ...


2

Ok. So there were a few basic errors, and possibly some confusion. Next, there are some power tricks that make using nested containers with custom (stateful) allocators much more convenient. Here's the roll-up of all three hints in a working sample that hopefully helps! Your strings must use shared memory allocators too Otherwise the data would be ...


1

The operator== is not a concern, because it is already defined in the standard library. However, the hash function has to be adapted from the std::hash specialization for std::u16string provided by the standard library, which will work for the std::unordered_* containers, but not Boost's ones. One solution might be to define the hashing function in the ...


1

The typename Hash = boost::hash<Key> template parameter is used to hash the keys to distribute entries into the hash table. However, multiple keys may have the same hash value (a collision). That's why you also need typename Pred = std::equal_to<Key>: to find the matching key, if any, among all the entries whose keys hashed to the same value.


1

These two articles explain the data structures underyling some common implementations of unordered associative containers: Implementation of C++ unordered associative containers Implementation of C++ unordered associative containers with duplicate elements Even though there are some differences between implementations, they are modest --one word per ...


1

Why `unordered_map` doesn't work reliably A good general-purpose hash function maps keys to buckets in a repeatable but otherwise seemingly random way, by which I mean that if the key varies by even a single bit then the bucket should be statistically unrelated - as if you'd picked another at random. So, say you have a hash table with some existing ...


1

insert takes a value_type, which is defined as: typedef std::pair<Key const, Mapped> value_type; void RuntimeData::hash_table(int id,Input input) { this->input_l1_map.insert(std::make_pair(id,input)); }


1

It should be deterministic but as long as they are so-called unordered, you should not rely on this to iterate over your elements.


1

You don't have to perform any locking here. If it's guaranteed that the keys already exist, then accessing them is a non-mutating operation which doesn't need locking (as long as nobody else is mutating). And each list is independent- as long as nobody else is accessing myMap["Apple"] at the same time, you're golden. Of course, you could simply use something ...


1

Since you're modifying only the contained object, not the [unordered_]map itself, you should only have to lock that contained object. If you change the list to another sequence (e.g., deque or vector) the same should remain true -- changing the type of the contained object doesn't change the fact that you're only modifying that contained object, not the map ...



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