Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

You can do something like this using a visitor functor with a call operator template: struct MyVisitor : public boost::static_visitor<> { template <typename StorageT> void operator()(const StorageT&) const { StorageT new_val = 32; // declare variable with same type doSomethingWith(new_val); // do something with ...


2

You cannot do that. Variables are syntactic constructs. They are names for program objects. Names only exist in the source code. The workflow is as follows. First you write the source. Then you compile it, run the program, and it executes some actions, for example, retrieves a value from a boost::variant object. At this point you cannot define any names. ...


0

Using the copy constructor should work: // construct object of same type as val StorageT new_val(val); boost::get(new_val) = 32.0;


2

You can write your own visitor with templated operator() like below: LIVE DEMO #include <iostream> #include <boost/variant.hpp> #include <type_traits> struct A { virtual ~A() {} virtual void foo() {} }; struct B : A { virtual void foo() { std::cout << "B::foo()" << std::endl; } }; template <typename T> struct visitor : ...


2

Generally, user-defined conversions lose overload resolution process to standard conversions. There is a built-in conversion from const char pointers to bool which is preferred over the non-built-in conversion from const char * to std::string (e.g. see Implicit conversions). std::string, while part of the standard library, is not a built-in type so its ...


2

From your question it's not clear what you're actually looking for. The answer depends on various factors: Assuming you have different types per column, are the types the same for all rows? Are the types known at compile time or only at run-time? In the simplest case of the types being known at compile time and being the same for all rows, why not simply ...



Top 50 recent answers are included