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17

Yes, there (pretty much) is. std::unique_ptr<T[]>. The primary template has a partial specialisation for this case, which provides the appropriate interface (operator [], no operator * etc.) Alternatively, you can wrap std::vector in your own class and restrict its interface. You could even do that by deriving a class from std::vector using non-public ...


10

As I surmised, there's a "highlevel" approach here. Boost ICL containers are more than just containers of "glorified pairs of interval starting/end points". They are designed to implement just that business of combining, searching, in a generically optimized fashion. So you don't have to. If you let the library do what it's supposed to do: using ...


5

Spirit Qi can be used with a scanner (Spirit Lex) or without. In my humble opinion, Spirit shines when using it scanner-less, though. The reason is mainly that Spirit shines when you avoid complexity, and using Spirit Lex acts like a complexity multiplier for your Spirit Qi grammar definition. That out of the way, yes you can switch to different ...


4

You can cobble something together with Boost Phoenix, for example. s_tests.push_back(test ( "test1", 1, phx::val(1), phx::ref(v) = arg1*1 )); s_tests.push_back(test ( "test2", 2, phx::val(2), phx::ref(v) = arg1*2 )); It will not achieve the natural C++ syntax, but at least it will be pretty full featured (it supports exceptions, while_, for_, switch_, ...


4

In your removal branch you re-tie() the iterators: boost::tie(vi, vi_end) = boost::vertices(m_graph); This will cause the loop to restart every time you restart the loop. This is exactly Schlemiel The Painter. I'll find out whether you can trust remove_vertex not triggering a reallocation. If so, it's easily fixed. Otherwise, you'd want an indexer-based ...


4

From the read_some reference: This function is used to read data from the stream socket. The function call will block until one or more bytes of data has been read successfully, or until an error occurs. With remarks: The read_some operation may not read all of the requested number of bytes. Consider using the read function if you need to ensure ...


4

That folder is off limits even to users with an Admin account, it contains restore points. Not that you couldn't change the ACL with such an account but that is of course not the correct solution. Trying to open a handle on the directory is too heavy-handed, use FindFirstFile() instead. Like this: WIN32_FIND_DATA info; auto hdl = ...


4

The maximum deviation is either the maximum value minus the mean or the mean minus the minimum, whichever is greater. This suggests the following simple implementation: double max_deviation(accumulator_set<double, features<tag::min, tag::max, tag::mean> > const &acc) { return std::max(max(acc) - mean(acc), mean(acc) - min(acc)); }


4

Use ternary operator. boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock = lockRequired ? boost::mutex::scoped_lock(Mutex) : boost::mutex::scoped_lock(); Or just use swap under condition. boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock; if (lockRequired) { boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock_(Mutex); lock.swap(lock_); } Or just construct lock with defer_lock_t and then call lock ...


4

It would have been nice to include a description of what the validation algorithm should validate, but I suppose the source is self-documenting. To find out whether a vector of strings contains only strings that contain a c, I'd use #include <algorithm> // for std::none_of #include <iterator> // for std::begin, std::end bool validate(const ...


4

Based on the error message boost::asio::io_service::run is overloaded or member template and std::bind() can't determine which overload or instantiation it is meant to use. You'll need to use something like this which deduces the appropriate type when taking the address, e.g., static_cast<std:size_t ...


3

template<class XSignal, class=typename std::enable_if< std::is_base_of<ISignal,XSignal>::value >::type > std::shared_ptr<XSignal> CopySignal( XSignal const& signal ) { return std::make_shared<XSignal>(signal); } is a function that can accept an instance of any class derived from ISignal and produces a shared ...


3

The constructor of fibonacci_heap that takes a lvalue reference (non-const) apparently doesn't do the right things. It's not documented what it should do: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_55_0/doc/html/boost/heap/fibonacci_heap.html#idp21129704-bb I assume this might be a reportable bug. I'll look into this a bit. UPDATE Surprisingly the behaviour of ...


3

template<class T, class U> boost::optional<T> optional_cast( U&& u ) { if (u) return T(*std::forward<U>(u)); else return {}; } will amusingly also work with pointers. int main() { boost::optional<int> i; ... // i gets initialized or not boost::optional<Foo> foo = optional_cast<Foo>(i); return 0; } ...


3

At the end of the permutation loop, you write: numCombinations++; std::cout << "[-INTERSEC-] " << combinations[numCombinations] << std::endl; // The problem appears here My debugger tells me that on the first iteration numCombinations was 0 before the increment. But incrementing it made it out of range for the combinations container ...


3

I have numerous examples doing this/similar written up on SO. Let me list the most relevant: I've done quite a few of these benchmarks. Yes, for sequential freading, read/scanf have a tiny edge (see e.g. scanf/iostreams and files vs. mappings, and parsing floats, or read being slightly faster for 1-pass sequential read). An interesting approach is to do ...


3

This appears to be Boost bug 8596, fixed in Boost 1.54. Briefly, in C++11 mode, boost::packaged_task's constructor is broken when passed an lvalue, storing a reference (!) instead of a copy. The functor is taken by forwarding reference, meaning that the template parameter was deduced to be an lvalue reference when an lvalue is passed. The code apparently ...


3

You have a bug in your post-increment operator. Specifically, what you implemented is pre-increment, not post-increment: iterator operator++(int) { ++pos_; return *this; // return value *after* having incremented it } The correct implementation would be: iterator operator++(int) { iterator tmp(*this); ++pos_; return tmp; // return ...


3

Oh wow. Thanks for finally showing me the first self-contained Boost Python example. So, let me repay you the service by suggesting to use Boost Iterator to handle the iterator complexity for you: Live On Coliru #include <Python.h> #include <boost/python.hpp> #include <boost/iterator/iterator_facade.hpp> class Foo { public: struct ...


3

The weird type you see is a boost::exception_detail::clone_impl< boost::exception_detail::error_info_injector< boost::bad_lexical_cast>>. It's a wrapper around (and derived from) bad_lexical_cast provided by Boost.Exception, which provides support for boost::exception_ptr and the error info facilities. It should be caught just fine by the first ...


3

The boyer_moore_search constructor takes a single template type parameter because both arguments to the constructor are the same type. You've provided two. Change your declaration of search to: boost::algorithm::boyer_moore<std::string::const_iterator> search(pattern.begin(), pattern.end()); and it will work.


3

Since you already use boost you can use regex to check whether your string is a valid UUID E.g for UUID version 4 you could use the following code bool validate_uuid(const std::string& s) { static const boost::regex e("[a-f0-9]{8}-[a-f0-9]{4}-4[a-f0-9]{3}-[89aAbB][a-f0-9]{3}-[a-f0-9]{12}"); return regex_match(s, e); // note: case sensitive now } ...


3

const char * doesn't implicitly convert to char * because that would be unsafe. The whole point of const is that you don't inadvertently attempt to modify the object. Suppose that const char * did implicitly convert to char *. Then what's preventing programs such as these: #include <cstdio> void f(char *s) { *s = 'a'; } int main() { const char *str = ...


3

The obvious answer is that you have multiple shared_ptrs referring to a single object, so resetting one reduces the reference count but doesn't delete the object. This can happen even if the shared_ptr isn't referenced outside of A and B. If you assign A or B without overloading operator= or copy A or B (e.g., pass by value, return by value) without ...


3

First of all, your myvector isn't defined or declared anywhere. Secondly, the line you say you have a problem with std::cout << ' ' << (*it)->id;, doesn't exist in your code. However, the problem is most likely the same as what you actually do have in your code. You are looping over a vector containing adjacency_list items, and then trying ...


3

UPDATE 2 As Pascal once said: "I have made this letter longer than usual, because I lack the time to make it short" I finally found the time to make it short! Now, it doesn't require boost anymore: 3. Using std::string::find_last_of You can use that really straightforward. It's essentially a oneliner here - except for the need to specify the set of ...


2

In order do this you need to first adapt your graph to the boost graph library (BGL) interface. As mentioned in the comment look at this question which links boost's how to convert existing graphs. It seems you are really asking two questions. How do I adapt my graph representation to BGL? and How do I perform (and extract meaning from) Dijsktra in boost? ...


2

A boost thread_group is a group of threads. All the threads are, by definition, distinct and unique. So, if your mutex fails to... "mut-ex" (mutually exclude) this indicates a programmer error elsewhere. On a whim, I'd suggest that perhaps your expectations of mutexes (recursive or not) is not accurate (in similar way as the expectations of a thread ...


2

My advice: Don't special-case on same type, but on multiplyability: struct Multiply : public boost::static_visitor<DataType> { template<typename T, typename U> static auto operator()(const T& a, const U& b) const -> decltype(DataType(a*b)){ return a*b; } template<typename... Ts> static DataType ...


2

I had the same problem and am managing to set glog flags in my main function as follows: namespace po = boost::program_options; int main(int ac, char **av) { po::options_description desc("..."); desc.add_options() ("verbosity,v", po::value<int>(), "set verbose logging level, defaults to 0") ; po::variables_map vm; try{ ...



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