New answers tagged

0

That does not happen, because there's still a pipe handle open in the child process; that is only closed on posix if you set it explicitly (on windows it is done automatically). So you'd need to add something like that: #if defined (BOOST_POSIX_API) fcntl(pstdout.sink, F_SETFD, FD_CLOEXEC); fcntl(pstderr.sink, F_SETFD, FD_CLOEXEC); #endif I would however ...


0

The usual thing that goes wrong is something like this: std::generate_n(out_iterator, 10, my_random); This copies the my_random object complete with state. Same thing can happen with lambdas: MyRandom my_random; std::generate_n(out_iterator, 10, [=] { return my_random.die(0,8); }); What you want is pass the engine by referece, either doing std::...


0

I had the same problem of mangled directory names. I installed boost using brew install boost and gcc using brew install gcc6. It turns out that the boost was build with the Apple's version of the GCC compiler, and the source file with the original GCC compiler. When I build your source file with Apple's compiler it does work. Alternatively, build boost ...


1

You are passing the lists by value, which requires a copy constructor. The error message is telling you that no copy constructor has been provided for list. The solution therefore is to pass the list by reference: double getlistvalue(const boost::python::list &l, int index) (and the same for the other function). In general, passing complex objects ...


1

This is one of those occasions where inline friend definitions shine: Live On Coliru #include <iostream> #include <boost/intrusive_ptr.hpp> template<typename T> class list { class node { std::size_t mutable refcount_; // friends of list because accessing private nested class node friend void ...


2

You're doing something else wrong/different: Live On Coliru #include <iostream> #include <fstream> #include <boost/property_tree/xml_parser.hpp> #include <boost/foreach.hpp> void parseXml(std::istream &stream) { using boost::property_tree::ptree; ptree pt; read_xml(stream, pt); BOOST_FOREACH(ptree::value_type ...


2

The Boost.Regex documentation explicitly states that there's no support for Unicode-specific character classes when using boost::wregex. If you want this functionality, you'll need to build Boost.Regex with ICU support enabled then use the boost::u32regex type instead of boost::wregex.


0

Accodring to header files in my Centos Linux, I changed #include <boost/filesystem.hpp> to #include <boost/filesystem/path.hpp> And also compiled my program with special link options: g++ test.cpp -o test.out -lboost_filesystem


1

It sounds like you have not yet installed the boost header files that you need for includes. Since you are on CentOS, you need to: yum install boost-devel That will place the header file you want in: /usr/include/boost/filesystem/path.hpp Since you are using boost::filesystem::path, you should change your #include <boost/filesystem.hpp> to #...


7

The error message gives you a clue: unresolved overloaded function type You pass in std::deque::push_back. Looking at a reference, you can see there are two overloads: void push_back( const T& value ); void push_back( T&& value ); // (since C++11) C++11 added a new overload. Therefore, passing a pointer to this as an argument becomes ...


3

The problem is that C++11 added an overload to push_back to support move semantics i.e. void push_front( T&& value ); So the compiler doesn't know which one to pick (<unresolved overloaded function type>). You have to spell it out, like this: boost::python::class_<DequeUInt64>("DequeUInt64") .def<void (DequeUInt64::*)( const T&)&...


0

I ended up adding a function that takes one of the map values and a slicing criteria, then returns a joined boost range over multiple boost slices, depending on the slicing criteria. In addition to that, I resorted to using auto return type inference of C++14 to avoid messing with the actual return types of boost adaptors and ranges. Here's a quick snippet: ...


1

You can try: g++ -std=c++11 -Os -Wall -pedantic test.cpp -lboost_system -lboost_filesystem -o test I had the same problem Let me know if is works best regards,


0

It depends on your input data. If you have a 14 digit timestamp at the beginning of every input line you could use: boost::regex regex("^(....)(..)(..)(..)(..)(..)");


0

With microsecond resolution time_duration: boost::posix_time::microseconds( _ts / TICKS_PER_MICROSECOND ) where TICKS_PER_MICROSECOND is the number of ticks per microsecond (e.g., 10 if ticks are hectonanoseconds, like in Windows FILETIME). The reason why the milliseconds constructor seems to work for some people is that it accepts a parameter type of ...


0

This is a known issue in boost::date_time: https://svn.boost.org/trac/boost/ticket/3109 A time_duration can represent larger intervals than number of seconds that the type of boost::time_duration::total_seconds() can represent. If you need the total number of seconds, better use time_duration td = ... auto seconds = td.ticks() / time_duration::...


1

N.B. there are a couple of issues with your code. In C++14 if you replace operator delete(void*) then you must also replace operator delete(void*, std::size)t). You can use a feature-test macro to see if the compiler requires that: void operator delete( void *p ) { free( p ); } #if __cpp_sized_deallocation // Also define sized-deallocation function: ...


0

First of all - sorry the the copy/paste error. It's been corrected now. Anyways - it turned out the problem was that I was writing (1024 * 100) bytes to socket each time - and this was too much for the sslSocket - while it worked fine for the httpSocket. Reducing it to just 1024 fixed the problem. I really should have checked the return value of the ...


1

Perhaps this free, open-source C++11/14 timezone library could help: #include "tz.h" #include <iostream> date::zoned_time<std::chrono::milliseconds> convert(date::sys_time<std::chrono::milliseconds> tp) { return date::make_zoned(date::locate_zone("Europe/Zurich"), tp); } int main() { using namespace std::chrono; std::cout <...


0

From http://www.radmangames.com/programming/how-to-use-boost-program_options: Specify an option that can be specified multiple times --option <value1> --option <value2> --option <value3> ("option", po::value<std::vector<arg_type> >(), "a list of values")


2

I believe the issues are: Need to return the example in make_example(). You are probably getting a compiler warning here that you ignored. Need to #include <boost/archive/binary_oarchive.hpp>. Otherwise, it should not even compile. Also, your comment // shouldn't use << as oa writes a text archive is not quite correct because << is now ...


0

It looks like the answer is simple -- boost implements serialization of the STL unordered_map, but not its own boost::unordered_map version :(.


1

boost::asio is able to do full-duplex operation, but you should manage buffers carefully. The general rules is: Only 1 read operation on given socket can be active at a time. Same for write operations So you can do 1 write and 1 read operation simultaneously. Situation you described should work in single-threaded environment since process cannot add to ...


0

Project Property Pages in Visual Studio are not the same for both configurations. At the Property Page, just set Configuration (top-left) to Release and set configuration for the release build independently.


0

The following code works for me. regex regExDate("\\d{4}-\\d{2}-\\d{2}"); string date = "abc:\\2016-09-12"; smatch match; if (regex_search(date, match, regExDate)) { string strDate = match.str(); }


-1

I've found out maybe an answer. If I define boost::multi_array in class in .hpp, it leads to error. BUT, if I define boost::multi_array in function in .cpp. It works. Don't know why but anyway it's a solution.


0

Use qi::as_string, e.g. #include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp> #include <boost/spirit/include/phoenix_core.hpp> #include <boost/spirit/include/phoenix_operator.hpp> #include <iostream> #include <string> int main() { namespace qi = boost::spirit::qi; namespace phoenix = boost::phoenix; std::string s("--1234--"); ...


2

As error message says, CMAKE_PREFIX_PATH should be set to installation prefix of the package. E.g., if the package has been built using CMake, this is CMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX variable's value, if the package has been build using Autotools, this is value of --prefix option used for configure it, and so on. CMake doesn't search every directory under ...


1

You can do this without using boost. Following the serialization approach described here, you can append the data of your matrix at the end of the file, taking care of increasing the number of rows of the final matrix accordingly. Here's a working example, where matappend does the job. I'll put also the matread and matwrite functions for completeness: #...


0

If you're using Visual Studio 2012 (it's not mentioned in the question), then this turns out to be a bug in the implementation, fixed in Visual Studio 2013. Quoting from http://cpprocks.com/44-c11-bugs-fixed-in-visual-studio-2013/ Useless wait functions in a future provided by promise There was a significant downside to using a future provided by a ...


0

Based on the documentation of boost::any, it will always make a copy of the contents that you provide it: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_58_0/doc/html/boost/any.html See item 4 and 8 in the "Description" section for documentation of the relevant constructor and assignment operator.


0

I was encountering the exact same issue with a very similar piece of code while using the Program Options library (version 1.58 in my case). My solution was to simply reinstall Boost (same version), and the problem was solved without any other code modifications or system changes. To sum up, this issue doesn't seem to be related to the Boost libraries ...


1

You are trying to initialize vector, which has a constructor S(const string& _s) with the type const char * and as per the C++ Standard (SC22-N-4411.pdf) section 12.3.4 titled 'Conversions' 4 At most one user-defined conversion (constructor or conversion function) is implicitly applied to a single value. So .... Convert/cast const char * to ...


3

You need another set of curly braces to use the std::initializer_list constructor. vector<S> vs{"vec_abcd"}; Tries to construct the vector with a const char[] parameter which will not work vector<S> vs{{"vec_abcd"}}; On the other hand initializes the vector with a single element initializer list. Look at it like vector<S> vs{{"...


-1

When you create a vector, you can specify size and (maybe) default item, in which case the syntax would be: vector vs(1,{"vec_abcd"}); (Boost must have more elaborate construction schemes) In my case I need to add -std=c++11 option, but if I do that it works with my modification. #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <vector> ...


1

Make a thread local static map from ptr-to-this to wrapper around shared-ptr to shared-ptr to-data. Make a non-static synchronized list of shared-ptr to shared-ptr to-data. Populate the thread local map on demand. When populated, add it to the instance list. At object destruction, use atomic shared ptr operations to clear the inner shared_ptr from all ...


0

I have a same problem. But I found a way to create the necessary files. Steps to follow: 1. If you have Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 then open MicroSoft visual Studio command prompt (2010) in administrator mode. 2. First enter the code : > bootstrap.bat 3. Then enter the following code to generate lib files: > b2.exe link=static runtime-link=...


0

No magic needed try this: auto& ref_map = my_map["a"]; auto& ref_slice = slices["a"]; std::cout << "a: "; std::copy ( ref_map.begin() + ref_slice.first, ref_map.begin() + ref_slice.second, std::ostream_iterator<int> (std::cout,", ") );


0

The listen_endpoint should be bound to the address of the local receiver endpoint, i.e. which network interface to use. Setting it to any() lets boost use the default receiver, e.g.: boost::asio::ip::udp::endpoint listen_endpoint ( boost::asio::ip::address_v4::any(), multicast_port ); The multicast_address should just be used to join the multicast ...


0

( auto a)[&]{ auto bounds = slices[a]; auto v = mymap[a]; return find(v.begin(),v.end(), bounds.first);} This for example will get you an iterator to the front edge based on your criterion the rest should be trivial with lambdas.


3

Well, you should not delete this when cancelling the operations since the callbacks for the pending I/O operations will still be invoked and then accessing this leads to undefined behavior. There are multiple ways to tackle this: Don't write data until you actually know that previous data has been written. You could queue the std::string instances passed ...


0

With visual studio, you can inject into a .obj file a library request using #pragma comment( lib, "libname.lib" ) This causes the linker to look for libname in the library path, and ensures the correct library is used. This can be disabled using /nodefaultlib on the link. With windows, the implementation of classes changes between release and debug (...


1

LNK1104 lets you know that you need to set the library location in the Library Directories. boost::asio depends on boost::system for error messages. boost::system is not a header-only library. You need to add the location of the boost libraries to the Library Directories under VC++ Directories on your solution's property pages. If you haven't built the ...


0

It is probably due to endianess issues. The following kind of code worked when tested with std::string bin = {'\x42', '\x74', '\xaa', '\x97'}; std::istringstream raw(bin); With byteswapping i.e. ntohl, float readFloat32(std::istream& stream) { union { float fval; uint32_t ival; } ret; stream.read((char*)&ret, sizeof(...


0

To avoid contention, the first thing you can do is to not start/run more threads (simultaneously) than there are cores (hyperthreads) to execute them.


0

....as always, posting to StackOverflow for me is cathartic. After smashing my head to the wall for hours, I post the problem here and then I find the solution in 5 minutes. I'll leave the solution here in case it could be useful to someone else in the future. My guess was right. He was looking for \usr\i686-pc-cygwin\bin\ar.exe in the wrong place. So I ...


1

You can fix this by putting the linker flag -lboost_iostreams after cppfile.cpp. The order is significant.


1

As a great poet once wrote, "wait for it". std::thread t([&](){ f.then(foo) .then([](boost::shared_future<int> x){ std::cout << "second stage " << 2 * x.get() << '\n'; return 2 * x.get(); }) .then([](boost::shared_future<int> x){ std::cout << "final stage " << 10 * x.get() << '\n'; }) .get(); }); ...


3

Here's what I might write: #include <boost/hana.hpp> #include <iostream> namespace hana = boost::hana; struct S_tag { }; struct S { using tag = S_tag; }; struct T { using tag = int; }; auto tag_of = [](auto t) -> hana::type<typename decltype(t)::type::tag> { return {}; }; auto is_S = [](auto t) { return hana::sfinae(tag_of)(...


0

Debian 7.11 Wheezy - amd64. Building the 55 libboost1.55 packages : /etc/apt/sources.lists ... added two lines : deb-src http://ftp.dk.debian.org/debian/ jessie main deb-src http://ftp.dk.debian.org/debian/ jessie/updates main The build-deps ( Summary of 'apt-get build-dep', and then some ) : # apt-get install g++ fakeroot dctrl-tools libbz2-dev libicu-...



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