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12

There is no such thing as NoSQL! NoSQL is a buzzword. For decades, when people were talking about databases, they meant relational databases. And when people were talking about relational databases, they meant those you control with Edgar F. Codd's Structured Query Language. Storing data in some other way? Madness! Anything else is just flatfiles. But in ...


5

You could half the time by reading the file once and not twice. While presizing the vector is beneficial, it will never dominate runtime, because I/O will always be slower by some magnitude. Another possible optimization could be reading without a string stream. Something like (untested) int c = 0; while (ins >> f) { data.push_back(f); if ...


5

I would imagine the first is fast because it is just setting mySecondProductLst to null since queryShortWay1 is not a List<Product> (it is most likely of type IQueryable<Product> or IEnumerable<Product>). The query is not executed here. The second "slow" example is actually executing your query. The real key here though is LINQ query ...


4

You are only looking at 5 steps here. Here's how it looks when you do 500 steps: I believe that this fluctuation comes from the Hoare's quickselect (the pivot selection is the problem - it might be very good but it might be very bad, quite random). Similar idea is used in quicksort so let's have a look: d = numpy.random.rand(3000) def test(n): ld = ...


3

You've got two options: 1) find a JSON module that will allow you to stream the stringify operation, and process it in chunks. I don't know if such a module is out there, if it's not you'd have to build it. EDIT: Thanks to Reinard Mavronicolas for pointing out JSONStream in the comments. I've actually had it on my back burner to look for something like ...


3

Instead of storing substrings, you could store data which refers to sections in the original string (either via pointers, iterators or integer indexes). You just have to be careful that the original string stays intact for as long as the reference data is used. Take a hint from boost::string_ref even if you're unwilling to use it directly.


3

Aho-Corasick is a very cool algorithm but it's not ideal for keyword matches, because keyword matches are aligned; you can't have overlapping matches because you only match a complete identifier. For the basic identifier lookup, you just need to build a trie out of your keywords (see note below). Your basic algorithm is fine: find the beginning of the ...


3

NoSQL is a database system which doesn't use string based SQL queries to fetch data. Instead you build queries using an API they will provide, for example Amazon DynamoDB is a good example of a NoSQL database. NoSQL databases are better for large applications where scalability is important.


3

When displaying on the terminal, your terminal needs to parse the stream for terminal control codes (ANSI,VT-100, etc), maintain terminal state (cursor positions, etc etc), and then render a bitmap representation (which can consist of thousands or millions of pixel bytes) several frames per second. This is much slower than simply dumping the bytes to a disk ...


3

Actually, SQLite will easily do 50,000 or more INSERT statements per second on an average desktop computer. But it will only do a few dozen transactions per second. Transaction speed is limited by the rotational speed of your disk drive. A transaction normally requires two complete rotations of the disk platter, which on a 7200RPM disk drive ...


3

On my machine, your reserve code takes about 1.1 seconds and your populate code takes 8.5 seconds. Adding std::ios::sync_with_stdio(false); made no difference to my compiler. The below C code takes 2.3 seconds. int i = 0; int j = 0; while( true ) { float x; j = fscanf( file, "%f", & x ); if( j == EOF ) break; data[i++] = x; // skip ...


2

Try calling std::ios::sync_with_stdio(false); at the start of your program. This disables the (allegedly quite slow) synchronization between cin/cout and scanf/printf (I have never tried this myself, but have often seen the recommendation, such as here). Note that if you do this, you cannot mix C++-style and C-style IO in your program. (In addition, ...


2

In general, I don't think you are going to find a fast way to do an in-place list edit with this kind of data dependency. Backwards iteration will work if you only depend on earlier items. Forward iteration will work if you only have forward dependencies. If you have both, you are going to need temporary variables to store the original values until they ...


2

This is a classic problem in backtracking (or parallel parsing, they are basically the same thing).... Backtracking grows (at worst) exponentially with the size of the input, so the time to parse something can suddenly explode. In practice backtracking works OK in language parsing for most input, but explodes with recursive infix operator notation. You ...


2

There are better substring algorithms than just a linear search, which is O(MxN). Look up the Boyer-Moore and Knuth-Morris-Platt algorithms. I tested these years ago and B-M won. You could also consider using a regular expression, which is more expensive to set up but could be more efficient in the actual search than your linear search.


1

Your 30 seconds were spent on 153 calls to sock.recv, each taking roughly 0.2 seconds. What you need to find out now is who is calling this function, and for that you need the call graph report from the profiler. Unfortunately the call graph is not included in the summary output from the Werkzeug profiler middleware, but if you use the profile_dir argument ...


1

If you are thinking about a service in which you can easily scale up/down your web server/database, I recommend you to look at a PaaS where you can easily get this approach paying every time for the services you use. Otherwise, you have to implement the mechanism through a load balancer where you can create multiple instances of your app, but then you have ...


1

There are 2 tiers to your application, the App server tier (for the Web site) and the database tier for the DB. Scaling each of these has much different consequences. In general scaling the app server tier is easy, especially if you do not store state (i.e., each request is independent). You can use a load balancer in front of your app server tier, and ...


1

The zeros are actually the correct result (in a way) considering the values of the virtual layer itself. Hopefully, your virtual layers (mdadm arrays) are fast enough that they are always zero. For example, avgqu-sz is number of requests in queue, but it passes the request to the disk almost immediately.


1

This is normal behaviour. I am assuming that you are using an iterative process to solve the weights at each evolution step (such as backpropagation?). If the number of neurons is large and the training (back-testing) algorithm is short, then it is normal that weight mutation such as this will consume a larger fraction of compute time during training of the ...


1

To be honest I have no idea what you're doing. But have you tried backwards iteration? It's a powerful technique. def f(thing): for x in xrange(len(thing) -1, 0, -1): thing[x] += thing[x-1] f(g) This will allow you to update without messing stuff up. You can also use backwards iteration to delete elements from a list. Essentially any operation ...


1

It will be hard to beat this code. Suppose your keywords are "a", "ax", and "foo". Take the list of keywords, sorted, and feed it into a program that prints out code like this: switch(pc[0]){ break; case 'a':{ if (0){ } else if (strcmp(pc, "a")==0 && !alphanum(pc[1])){ // push "a" pc += 1; } else if (strcmp(pc, "ax")==0 ...



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