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36

You can activate runtime iterator and bounds checking by compiling with -D_GLIBCXX_DEBUG. Also note that random-access containers provide the always bounds-checking at()-operation in addition to operator []. References: GCC STL debug mode: http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/libstdc++/manual/debug_mode_using.html#debug_mode.using.mode at() operation: ...


19

Visual Studio 2005 and 2008 already do bounds-checking on operator[] by default, in both debug and release builds. The macro to control this behavior is _SECURE_SCL. Set it to 0 to disable bounds-checking. Their current plan in VS2010 is to disable bounds-checking by default in release builds, but keep it on in debug. (The macro is also getting renamed to ...


15

Deleting a derived-class object through a base-class pointer when the base class does not have a virtual destructor leads to undefined behavior. What you've observed (that the derived-class portion of the object never gets destroyed and therefore its members never get deallocated) is probably the most common of many possible behaviors, and a good example of ...


9

Do you have "Stop on Delphi Exceptions" turned on? (Tools\Debugger Options\Language Exceptions [Delphi7]) Otherwise it won't break in your sourcecode. Also make sure that EListError is not in your "Exception Types to Ignore" list. This list is also found at Tools\Debugger Options\Language Exceptions (Delphi 7).


8

madExcept (free) or EurekaLog (paid) may help. You can set them up to show/email a stack trace when an error occurs. I use EurekaLog in all my projects and it is invaluable for fixing these kinds of things.


8

Enable the flag _GLIBCXX_DEBUG to do bounds checking on STL containers, as discussed here: http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/libstdc++/manual/debug_mode.html


6

Hey, you don't need any additional tools to track this! :) Just run your application under debugger and make sure that "Stop on Delphi Exceptions" (or whatever it is called in your Delphi's version) is turned ON. When exception occurs - there will be a notification from debugger. Press "Ok"/"Debug" button and just view the call stack. Call stack window is ...


5

You can try Memory Validator. You can try the evaluation copy of the same as well. Licensed version prices


5

clang does, even with no special flags turned on: $ clang example.c -o example example.c:13:18: warning: array index of '5' indexes past the end of an array (that contains 5 elements) [-Warray-bounds] printf("%d", test.x[5]); ^ ~ example.c:5:5: note: array 'x' declared here int x[5]; ^ 1 warning generated. The same ...


4

No, that's not possible. Not having array bound checking in C/C++ is how Microsoft got into such deep trouble with malware. It is a no-no in managed code. For and For Each loops will run without bound checking if the JIT compiler can detect that the begin- and end-indices are within bounds. This is one of the reasons that the For loop "TO" value is only ...


4

If the constructor of AnotherClass allocates memory which isn't deallocated in ~AnotherClass you will have a memory leak.


3

Beware of Compuware's bounds checker: It is stable up to a point. It costs about 3600 dollars, and about an equal amount to maintain from year to year. But that is peanuts compared to Coverity. I haven't gotten a good test run to work right under Bounds Checker for the last 3 years. That is why I don't use it anymore, and why I don't recommend you use it, ...


3

Parasoft has a tool called Insure++ (link: http://www.parasoft.com/jsp/products/quick_facts.jsp?product=Insure) which says it'll do that. I've used Insure++ on 32-bit and 64-bit apps on Linux and it worked okay. It sometimes got confused when it was trying to parse template/stl code and would fall over. That url says it works on 32- and 64-bit windows, ...


3

I don't know if there's an idiomatic metaphor that's commonly used. The phrase "guard region" is sometimes used.


2

As this is an RTL/VCL error, you often end up with better breaking/callstack behaviour if you enable Debug DCU's (and rebuild).


2

I have experienced the same in various OS/CRT Dlls. One of the patterns is where I get the DC of a window (GetDC or GetWindowDC) in order to perform whatever operation I like (i.e. creating a compatible memory DC). I release the DC after I am done with it, and even if I do not select any GDI objects in it I sometimes get a Boundschecher warning stating ...


2

I last used BoundsChecker a few years ago, and had the same problems. With large projects, it makes everything run so slowly that it is useless. We ended up ditching it. But, we still needed some of it's functionality, but like you, not for the whole program. So we had to do it ourselves. In our case, we mainly used it to try and track down memory leaks. ...


2

BoundsChecker 9.01 now supports VC2008 and x64 bit, at last.


2

Microsoft's Application Verifier tool is very good at detecting leaks as well as a bunch of other common programming mistakes on Windows (COM, heaps, TLS, locks, etc). It doesn't do so much in the way of profiling, but it will give you the stack of where the memory was allocated when you leak it, or the stack where it was free'd the first time if you double ...


2

I've been fairly happy with AQTime, and the pricing is tough to beat (and very transparent - $599/user). The allocation profiler works fairly well - it's not quite as sophisticated as Boundschecker (from what I remember of Boundschecker), but what it does, it does well - and it handles quite a few other things, too.


2

insure++ only workse if you instrument your code. I once tried it. It took about 5 minutes to compile about 1000 lines of code. Since the project that I needed to compile was huge, I quickly determined that Insure++ was not going to work. Not to mention their reporting, or output from Insure++ is pretty archaic. also the runtime performance penalty was ...


2

FYI: BoundsChecker 10.0 runs on Windows XP through Windows 7, on both 32 and 64 bit versions. It supports WOW64 applications, and it also supports Visual Studio 2010. In fact, we released VS2010 support within 30 days of Microsoft's release. We are catching up with our backlog. We were very late getting the VS2005 and VS2008 support out (with BC 9.0, ...


2

Although this is technically undefined, you still need to know the most common method of failure in order to diagnose it. That common method of failure is to call the wrong destructor. I don't know of any implementation that will fail in any other manner, though admittedly I only use two implementations. The reason this happens is the same reason the ...


2

What you're trying to do doesn't really work. You can do a template value parameter: void foo(int i)() { /* use i at compile time */ } but then you can't pass a runtime value to it, and it has different call syntax: foo!2 vs foo(2). The closest you can get is is CTFE: int foo(int i) { return i; } enum something = foo(2); // works, evaluated at compile ...


2

What we are seeing here is a nasty, little known secret about BoundsChecker: it gives you no visibility into structure members at all. If you declare an array as part of a structure, whether that structure is allocated automatically or dynamically, BoundsChecker sees the structure as a blob. If you overrun the boundaries of that structure, it will report ...


1

Since that code has nothing to do with assembler, I don't know what to do. Assembler problems are the only ones I can see in my google search on that topic. Looks like you're invoking the wrong assembler - a 32 bit one, trying to compile a 64bit object code. Check your PATHs and flags. UPDATE: I never looked into how exactly gcc invokes its ...



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