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16

zsh$ setopt BRACE_CCL zsh$ echo {a-k} a b c d e f g h i j k zsh$ echo {1-9} 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


12

... There is so much wrong with using eval. What you're asking is only possible with eval, BUT what you might want is easily possible without having to resort to bash bug-central. Use arrays! Whenever you need to keep multiple items in one datatype, you need (or, should use) an array. TEST=(quick man strong) touch "${TEST[@]/%/ly}" That does exactly ...


10

Use this line for a nice output without using loops: echo $[{1..10}*{1..10}] | xargs -n10 | column -t Output: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 7 14 21 ...


9

The problem is probably that Make spawns /bin/sh. It is usually a symlink to your system's default shell. Option 1 You could make sure it points to bash (as this is a bashism). Probably, it is now /bin/dash or /bin/sh, depending on your version of Ubuntu. Option 2 Easier option: SHELL=/bin/bash all: @echo a{3,4} @bash -c 'echo a{3,4}' This ...


8

bash does brace expansion before variable expansion, so you get weekly.{0..4}. Because the result is predictable and safe(Don't trust user input), you can use eval in your case: $ WEEKS_TO_SAVE=4 $ eval "mkdir -p weekly.{0..$WEEKS_TO_SAVE}" note: eval is evil use eval carefully


6

Another way of doing it without eval and calling mkdir only once: WEEKS_TO_SAVE=4 mkdir -p $(seq -f "weekly.%.0f" 0 $WEEKS_TO_SAVE)


6

Curly braces don't support variables in BASH, you can do this: for (( c=0; c<WEEKS_TO_SAVE; c++ )) do mkdir -p weekly.${c} done


5

do it like this #!/bin/bash read -p "Enter the num: " n for i in {1..10} do m=$(( n*i )) echo "$i * $n" = $m done the shebang is wrong, and don't leave space in brace expansion eg {0..10}, not { 0..10 }


5

I'm hoping to be proven wrong here, but I don't believe there is a way to do it exactly like with bash, or with as few keystrokes. You can iterate over the list by piping it through a foreach-object to achieve the same result though. 1..5 | foreach-object { "test" + $_ } Or using the shorthand: 1..5 | %{"test$_"} In both cases (% is an alias for ...


4

this seems to work, just escaped the $ and [] to delay their evaluation (so that they are echoed, then evaluated) eval echo \$\[{1..$boundary}*{1..$boundary}\] That said I now need to go lookup what $[] does ;-) Second answer, with non deprecated $[] syntax (but two evals) eval eval echo "\$\(\("{1..$boundary}*{1..$boundary}"\)\)" or eval eval ...


4

In bash, you can do this: #!/bin/bash TEST=quick,man,strong eval echo $(echo {$TEST}ly) #eval touch $(echo {$TEST}ly) That last line is commented out but will touch the specified files.


4

The range expression form of brace expansion is used in place of seq in a for loop: for i in {1..100} do something # 100 times done


4

The straightforward way is #!/bin/bash for i in {x1,x2,x3}.jpg {y1,y2}.png; do echo $i done


4

That's called Brace Expansion, which expands to a space-separated list of the given strings. So touch {a,b,c} would be equivalent to touch a b c While touch {a,b,c}x would be equivalent to: touch ax bx cx You pear command would essentially be run as: pear channel-discover pear.phpunit.de pear.symfony-project.com which may not be what you expected. ...


4

The problem is that contrary to your expectation, the brace expansion of touch {a,b,c} is equivalent to touch a b c # NOT 3 separate invocations. (Use echo {a,b,c} to verify). It appears that pear channel-discover does not accept two args. You will probably see the same error with pear channel-discover pear.phpunit.de pear.symfony-project.com


4

You can't do this with {foo,bar} syntax; bash only expands that if it sees literal commas between the braces. (I suppose you could use eval, but that brings its own mess.) Just use loops: for dir in "${dirs[@]}"; do for file in "${files[@]}"; do for ext in "${extensions[@]}"; do echo "$dir$file$ext" done done done


4

PS C:\> "test","dev","prod" | % { "server-$_" } server-test server-dev server-prod PS C:\> 1..5 | % { "server{0:D2}" -f $_ } server01 server02 server03 server04 server05 PS C:\> 1..5 | % { "192.168.0.$_" } 192.168.0.1 192.168.0.2 192.168.0.3 192.168.0.4 192.168.0.5 Note that % is an alias for the ForEach-Object cmdlet. Bill


4

The short answer is echo bunny(seq 6) Longer answer: In keeping with fish's philosophy of replacing magical syntax with concrete commands, we should hunt for a Unix command that substitutes for the syntactic construct {1..6}. seq fits the bill; it outputs numbers in some range, and in this case, integers from 1 to 6. fish (to its shame) omits a help page ...


4

Why the first command does not work like the command in the example? Because you have introduced an extra space: # |==> This is it! # | $ echo {file1,file2}\ {\ A," B",' C'} file1 file2 A B C $ echo {file1,file2}\ {\ A," B",' C'} # This is probably what you expected! file1 A file1 B file1 C file2 ...


3

Brace expansion is performed while parsing the line, and will not happen inside quotes.


2

For example, make a backup of all your files in a directory: for i in * ; do cp "$i"{,.bak} done


2

The printf built-in repeats its format as many times as necessary to print all arguments, so: printf '%d %d %d %d %d %d %d %d %d %d\n' $[{1..10}*{1..10}] If you want to avoid repeating the %d bit, it's trickier. printf "$(echo %$[{1..10}*0]d)\\n" $[{1..10}*{1..10}] In production code, use a loop.


2

In bash, you use brace expansion if you want to create a range, eg for r in {0..100} for r in {0..10..2} #with step of 2 for z in {a..z} Instead of using external commands such as seq 0 100. Also , brace expansion can be used to list file types, eg for file in *.{txt,jpg}. This list all files that has txt and jpg extensions.


2

Since you're writing a script, there's no reason to write hard-to-maintain code using eval tricks VAR="f1,f2,f3" IFS=, set -- $VAR for f; do rm -r "/path/to/$f" done or VAR=( f1 f2 f3 ) for f in "${VAR[@]}"; do rm -r "/path/to/$f" done


2

No, it's due to the fact that brace expansion happens before parameter expansion. Find another way of doing this, such as with xargs. xargs -d , -I {} rm -rf /some/path/{} <<< "$VAR"


2

What you're showing here isn't really recursive. If you could nest the brackets, then that would be recursive. basically what you have is a simple grammar: thing ::= element { "/" element }* element ::= symbol || list list ::= "{" symbol { "," symbol }* "}" symbol ::= [a-z]+ That's a off the cuff grammar language. * means "zero or more", + means "1 or ...


2

#!/bin/bash document_root="/var/www/www.example.com" chmod -R g+w $document_root/{../captcha,../files} Don't prefix a variable with $ when you are assigning to a variable, only when expanding You don't need the backticks around chmod, doing so treats the whole thing as a command


2

Brace expansion does not support it. You will have to do it using a loop. Brace expansion is performed before any other expansions, and any characters special to other expansions are preserved in the result. It is strictly textual. Bash does not apply any syntactic interpretation to the context of the expansion or the text between the braces. To ...


2

Make sure that braceexpand is turned on with set -o braceexpand.


2

If you're on any kind of Unix, Linux or OS X system, there is a built in library function to do this. man 3 glob will tell you about how to call it from C. Or you can visit http://linux.die.net/man/3/glob to find online documentation. If you want to roll your own, a simple way to go is to first scan the string and build an intermediate data structure, and ...



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