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There are many workflow define by various source control tool. I am not sure which source control tool are you using, But truth is every strategy has advantages and disadvantages, Its up to you to choose the best fit for your requirement. You can even decide the workflow recommended for the VCS you are using.


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This can be accomplished using the subtree merge strategy, or the subtree[=<path>] option to the recursive merge strategy. From the git-merge documentation, the description of the subtree strategy: subtree This is a modified recursive strategy. When merging trees A and B, if B corresponds to a subtree of A, B is first adjusted to match the ...


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In my case this was driving me nuts, as it was quite obvious that the commit I wanted to cherry pick had not been added to my current branch. It turns out someone had already cherry picked the commit a week or more ago. The changes were already in my current branch, and I had not noticed them. Check the file(s) that you're attempting to cherry pick. If ...


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Closest to familiar ways is to do the merge --no-commit --no-ff and undo anything you don't like about its usual behavior, e.g. git checkout A git merge --no-commit --no-ff B git checkout @ dir2 # nope, didn't want dir2 gone git commit This is likely best when the usual command already does what you want except for a couple of little things, and you ...


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It's probably not ideal, but this is the approach I've used for a couple similar projects... Introduce a third branch, named core, for example. Do all your development that you want to be available on both platforms on that branch, and only do platform-specific development on the platform-specific branches. Periodically merge core into each of the platform ...


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I recommend to not use branches for platform specific files. Reorganize the project so that all platforms are together in a single directory tree and common files are present only once. Like Linux kernel - it has arch directory with platform-specific code, not a bunch of branches. What happens when you need to develop some new feature that's larger than ...


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I don't think there is a straight away nice and clean solution for this, but as a workaround you could play a little bit with the .gitignore files to accomplish that. If you include ./dir2/* in your .gitignore file, dir2 will never be merged neither from A to b nor from B to A, but if you modify files from that directory these files won't be tracked by git ...


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If you're working on not just adding new fields and tables but making major schema changes, you can add and migrate all the constructive changes for the feature branch without breaking the tables and columns that exist for the schema defined in the initial branch. Then when the changes are tested and working as expected on the feature branch you can add ...


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Just clarifying some terminology in James Reed's answer. re: "I don't consider the source a branch" In a biological tree, the Trunk is not called a Branch. In computer terminology, both sides of a branching relationship are called Branches. It is only the visualization that chooses to show the original branch as a trunk like on a biological tree. ...


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There are two approaches: 1) Branches can be made retrospectively, so the easiest is to ditch the branch you created and simply create a new branch that is taken from the change-set (or date/time, or label) just prior to your unwanted check-in. If you have some later check-ins that you still want to keep in the branch, just merge them into the new branch as ...


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GitHub actually has very concise guide for this precise purpose which I found helpful. Practically, there is a difference in the relationship between branches and the directory structure. SVN branches are actually folders in the repo. Create another branch and the files are duplicated for you to work on (the trunk directory is copied into a new-branch ...


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You didn't commit your merge.. Mercurial told you : hg merge default merging path/to/a/file/foo.java 3 files updated, 1 files merged, 0 files removed, 0 files unresolved (branch merge, don't forget to commit) When you merge, all files stay modified in your sources, and you need to commit them hg commit -m "merge with default" Then your branch will appear ...


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Scenario A: If your large files were only added to a branch, you don't need to run git filter-branch. You just need to delete the branch and run garbage collection: git branch -D mybranch git reflog expire --expire-unreachable=all --all git gc --prune=all Scenario B: However, it looks like based on you bash history, that you did merge the changes into ...


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I would just use an external tool like vimdiff to diff the two files that I want to merge and then merge them. The advantage of this is that you can do selective editing on parts of the file. E.g: hg update -r branch-merging-to hg extdiff -p vimdiff -r branch-merging-from file-I-am-merging To do this you need to enable the external tools in your .hgrc, ...



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