Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Yes, that would be a misuse of branches. There are two better options: Commit with some standard message (e. g. "cleanup" ) git tag -m"feature_name cleanup"


0

What could be a good solution for this ? Don't use SVN (it seems you are SVN-boys, at least for used terminology), branching|merging are a lot easier in DVCSes Even with SVN - branch from CurrentRelease@HEAD-1 (previous to mergeset of trunk) revision, commit fix, merge back to CurrentRelease, delete hotfix-branch (not mandatory, just for ...


1

* | 54bd96c This is the single time when you commited both in your master branch and a feature branch. A usual merge was used, resulting in this commit: * 19d189f <- Here I merged back in In all other cases you merged a branch, having no commits made to master since the branch point. A fast-forward merge was used, which doesn't create a merge ...


0

I got the exact solution which is more or less the first option Jesse you provided. Basically we need to create the common projects for one of the solutions and then branch them in another solution. At a later point in time we can merge them from solution 1 to 2 checkin the merged files in solution 2 and then merge from solution 2 to 1 and checkin the merged ...


1

Because your situation happens quite often (working on a main branch, only later to realize you should have branched), this is use case is supported by TFS (both command line and within Visual Studio). Instead of specifying By Latest (default) or, By: Latest Version, you want to specify By: Changeset and select the last check-in that should be included in ...


0

Team Build assumes that everything will be under one label. But that label can contain folders at different versions, so instead of your "Master text file" you could create a Master Label that contains all the files at different versions. This is a very uncommon practice but it should work: tf label MasterLabel $/Project/FolderA /recursive /version:c1 tf ...


0

According to this NetBeans issue (bug 137072) NetBeans does not have a repository browser. Therefore, you should use an external Subversion client for this task (i.e. not the one built-in to NetBeans IDE).


1

Just add it to your central branch (normally dev or develop) and ask everyone to git merge or git rebase from it, which they are normally meant to be doing regularly anyway.


1

Either record the ancestry explicitly by making the new commit at the merge base of all the branches then git merge --no-ffing that, or make the new commit anyplace and cherry-pick it from everywhere else. There's a very widely-used branching model that uses the branch-and-merge-no-ff method.


0

No your parent branch will be unaffected, except for one thing, it will retain the historical relationship to the incorrectly created child branch. So in the Merge window, it may show up as a potential target branch. If you want to prevent that from happening, you should destroy (instead of delete) the incorrectly created branch.


0

You are using branches as a configuration manager. I know this is tempting, but branches are meant for parallel development, feature separation, and the like. An advice I got might have its place here, although I did not want to follow it at first: "do not create a branch that you do not plan to eventually merge". Otherwise you are going to live in a ...


0

Yes, this scenario is possible in TFVC, but not very common. You have a few options: Create a branch root at the solution level and merge the files from solution one to solution two. As part of the merge operation exclude the files you don't want to merge. Later you can merge backwards and forwards at the folder level. Create a folder relationship, but do ...



Top 50 recent answers are included