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17

Strictly speaking, packet duplication in IP network is allowed behavior of the network and you have to be able to deal with it in your software even if you will somehow get rid of it this time. If you are just wondering about why this happens in your particular case... at a first glance I see nothing wrong with your code. Do you have several IP addresses on ...


16

The documentation about the AlarmManager says that : Registered alarms are retained while the device is asleep (and can optionally wake the device up if they go off during that time), but will be cleared if it is turned off and rebooted. It seems that the AlarmClock included by default by Android does work even after a reboot. On way to keep your ...


8

I am a bit surprised this works on the same machine. I would not have expected the client, listening to port 1666, to receive data being sent to the broadcast address on port 8888. bind() assigns a local endpoint (composed of a local address and port) to the socket. When a socket binds to an endpoint, it specifies that the socket will only receive data ...


6

HI, i created the broadcast audio LIVE over the internet use of AudioStream Files. For the reference of Audiostreamer AudioStreamer. For Download in github Github Download


5

The deciding factor is usually whether the clients are on the same, or otherwise multicast enabled/linked networks. In general, Multicast is going to be MUCH more efficient than any form of unicasting, however, multicasting is not reliable, and does not work across heterogeneous networks like the internet, where the operators tend to disable multicast ...


5

No, a single pipe only supports a single client. Much like a web server, it also creates multiple connections to each individual client. A pipe server works the same way. Yes, bridging the wall between processes is a major use case for named pipes. Windows supports a different object for broadcasting, a mailslot. It was never ported to .NET, it is ...


4

To broadcast data packets, send them to the broadcast address of the given subnet (the last address of the subnet). The IP 255.255.255.255 is the broadcast address for the zero network. A special definition exists for the IP broadcast address 255.255.255.255. It is the broadcast address of the zero network or 0.0.0.0, which in Internet Protocol ...


4

You can try SignalR. It's a .NET library designed for this kind of real-time functionality.


4

You can use SignalR. It's very good way to send near real time messages from server side to client side. It has both server and client side objects. On client it supports different transports that browser supports like WebSocket, Long Pooling, etc


3

Check out this Google code project for android ip camera, it used nanoHttpd server for streaming video in android device http://code.google.com/p/ipcamera-for-android/ download source and try it


3

Actually, there is a ready to run example that includes both strong client authentication and fine-grained, flexible authorization for PubSub (publish and/or subscribe rights?) - also for RPC btw. Disclaimer: I created Autobahn and work for Tavendo.


3

The most technically appropriate solution for this is simply: web-sockets. They are designed exactly for this, and it is how most major sites with a real-time requirement prefer to work. It is indeed how the real-time updates here on stackoverflow work. The minor glitch here is that some browsers (ok, IE) don't support them - so if the update is important ...


3

If you want to have your BroadcastReceivers triggered regardless of your apps state then you should register them through your applications AndroidManifest.xml file. Heres how to do it. Define a class that extends BroadcastReceiver and implement the onReceive() method. I see that you have already done that - ProximityIntentReceiver is that class. In your ...


3

SignalR utilizes 4 transports through which it handles data from the server. Only one transport is used at a time but SignalR has 4 to ensure server/client communication on a wide variety of devices/browsers. Here's the transports and a short technical description: Long Polling, to receive data it uses an ajax request whose response is not released until ...


3

I decided to use them both! Simple use case: In order to communicate with TCP prococol you have to establish a connection which you can have only if you know IP and Port on both ends. If you do not have that information when you load your Application, then you use the UDP to Broadcast your IP address and your intention to find the/a Server. You may try ...


3

Yes. You can simply check the first octet of the IPv4 address, if it starts with 1110, it is an IPv4 multicast address. Beware of host vs network byte ordering when checking an IPv4 address represented in binary.


3

Any device with Android 4.3+ and a Bluetooth Low Energy chipset can detect beacons with this library. As of December 2014, this is approximately 40 percent of Android devices according to the Google Play Store and growing quickly. To transmit as Peripheral Mode, Android 5.0+ and firmware supporting Bluetooth Low Energy Peripheral Mode are required. As of ...


3

If you are trying to create a stream target in Wowza Streaming engine, I would start with a simple example as follows: <?php // Modify values here $entryName = "ppSource"; $appName = "live"; $streamName = "myStream"; $userName = "user"; $password = "pass"; $profile = "rtmp"; $server = "localhost"; // End modification $url = "http://{$server}:8087/v2/...


3

OK, I found an answer. Windows 7 doesn't support 255.255.255.255 broadcasts anymore, apparently it was an opening to various threats. To broadcast, one needs to use a different approach. This is a small explenation from Wikipedia: The broadcast address for an IPv4 host can be obtained by performing a bitwise logical OR operation between the bit ...


2

Here's a C# example: using System; using System.Net; using System.Net.Sockets; using System.Threading; class MainClass { static void Main(string[] args) { ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(StartUDPListener); UdpClient udpClient = new UdpClient(); udpClient.Send(new byte[]{0x00}, 1, new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Broadcast, 4567)); ...


2

Set up the IPEndPoint to use the ANY address: int port = ...your port goes here... var endPoint = new IPEndPoint( IPAddress.Any, port ); Then use UDPClient.Receive as you normally would.


2

Here is example code for both the broadcast sender and receiver. It should be easily portable to any language which has access to the standard Berkly Sockets API. #!/usr/bin/perl -w # broadcast sender script use strict; use diagnostics; use Socket; my $sock; my $receiverPort = 9722; my $senderPort = 9721; socket($sock, PF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, getprotobyname(...


2

I would rather split the problem in three parts: Get an audio stream Broadcast the stream Integrate the stream in your web site A typical scenario would be 1. you record a show at home, and 2. send the stream to your hosted server from where it is broadcasted. 3- Your users can listen to the show directly from your website. Of course, for a limited ...


2

Creating a thread instead of using a TP thread is quite expensive, both in system resources and time. Passing data through, say, a thread-safe queue can be performant, provided you haven't maxed out the available cores (which sounds very likely) and the receiving thread is blocking on a synchronization object that you signal. Typical thread context switch ...


2

JavaMail can also be used to fetch mails from a POP3 server. As an example look at this class: PopMailImporter.java, especially the importMails and importMail function.


2

If you're on Windows, you may want to consider the free Windows Media Encoder 9 SDK (http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windowsmedia/forpros/encoder/features.aspx). The idea is that Windows Media Encoder allows you to use any device as a media source (say, a video capture card or a streaming-enabled camcorder) and to push it out as an ASF stream, or even to ...


2

There is unfortunately no solution (at least as of Jan 2011). According to Microsoft: "We add a few seconds of delay during the encoding, then there's caching going on at the server level that can add another 5-20 seconds and finally Silverlight also caches for another few seconds of delay." http://social.expression.microsoft.com/Forums/is/encoder/thread/...


2

UDP packets aren't reliable, it's totally possible that you'll get the same packet twice or even none at all, when using udp you need to include some kind of unique ID in your data so you can discard errors or request a resend.


2

Your question is unclear. If you are broadcasting it doesn't make any difference whether you use DatagramSocket or MulticastSocket. If you are asking whether multicast is more efficient than broadcast, (a) the answer is 'yes', and (b) you must use MulticastSocket for receiving the multicasts; for sending them, again, you can use either DatagramSocket or ...


2

Multi-cast is the best option if you have clients on multiple sub-networks. Broadcast can be marginally more efficient if you are sending data only one sub-network. However multi-cast is usually used as the difference is pretty tenuous. What the data contains is not important. You may find that if you need reliable delivery, that using TCP is simpler and ...



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