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I don't believe there exists any standardized measure of how sorted or random an array is. You can come up with your own measure - like count the number of adjacent pairs which are out of order (suggested in comment), or count the number of larger numbers which occur before smaller numbers in the array (this is trickier than a simple single pass).


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The example you gave above shows that this algorithm isn't a strict improvement over a standard bubble sort. The advantage of this approach (sometimes called "cocktail sort," by the way) is that in cases where there are a lot of small elements at the end of the array, it rapidly pulls them to the front compared against normal bubble sort. For example, ...


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Are you familiar with the general sorting lower bound? You can prove that in a comparison-based sorting algorithm, any sorting algorithm must make Ω(n log n) comparisons in the average case. The way you prove this is through an information-theoretic argument. The basic idea is that there are n! possible permutations of the input array, and since the ...


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Here is an error in the swapping temp= matrix[i][j]; matrix[i][j]= matrix[i][j+1]; matrix[i][j]= temp; should be temp= matrix[i][j]; matrix[i][j]= matrix[i][j+1]; matrix[i][j+1]= temp; // <--- j+1 EDIT The sort also fails since the j loop can start before the i loop and reverse a previous swap. But it's quite unclear in what way ...


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It's certainly possible to do this, since any iterative algorithm can be converted to a recursive one and vice-versa. Here's one way that we can do this. For simplicity, I'm using C++ and assuming the inputs are all integers. void bubbleSort(std::vector<int>& list) { /* Make one pass of swapping elements. If anything was swapped, * ...


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Regard the applied swap() to a[i] and a[i+1] as a bubble-up of a[i]. Now, asking how many swaps are going to happen is the same as asking how many bubble-up operations are going to happen. Well, and how many do we have of those? Each a[i] will bubble-up for each position j > i, where a[j]<a[i]. In words a[i] will bubble-up for each position to the ...


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Can make like this: for (int i = set.length-1; i >= 0; i --) { for (int j = 0; j < i; j++) { if (set[j] > set[j + 1]) { int aux = set[j]; set[j] = set[j + 1]; set[j + 1] = aux; } } } The initial loop, ...


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Bubble sort set array :- int temp = 0; for(int i = 0;i<set.length-1;i++) { for(int j = 0;j<set.length-1;j++) { if(set[j]>set[j+1]) { temp = set[j]; set[j] = set[j+1]; set[j+1] = temp; } } } //Your set array is sorted using bubble sort at this point.


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for (i = 0 ; i < set.length() -2; i ++){ for(j = i+1 ; j< set.length()-1 ; j++){ if(set[i]<set[j]){ int dummy = set[i]; set[i] = set[j]; set[j] = dummy; } } } The above bubble sort is sorting only the 6 generated numbers and your Bonus ball is still present at set[6] So now rest is your printing function works.


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An array index out of bounds exception is what happens when you try to access an item in the array that doesn't exist. In your case that is element -1. Arrays can only contain elements with indexes greater than 0. When you get errors like this, if you read the error it will give you info, and a line number. Also it's probably better to google for the ...


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Exception java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException is raised when you try to access a negative index from an array or a index bigger than its length. In this case, you tried to access the index -1 in your second for inside the bubble method - for(int i=0;i<n-1;i--). Changing i-- to i++will fix it as you're starting i from 0 and want it to increments ...


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in method bubble for(int i=0;i<n-1;i--) change i-- to i++



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