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4

Ok got it. The answer is :b# Use the command repetitively to toggle between two files. Thanks to Related questions on this site!


3

It's actually pretty simple: Start with the last element. Add one. If you now have '0'+10 (58), adjust it to 'A' (65). If you have anything other than 'T' (too lazy to look up ASCII code) you are done. Adjust to '0' (48). Carry by moving left one element and repeating from step 2 onward.


3

Well what you want to do is serialization. Say you have such structure: struct PointFull { int lat; int lon; }; and also PointFull item1, item2; The way you serialize it to buffer is: unsigned char arr[20] = {0}; memcpy(arr, &item1.lat, sizeof(int)); memcpy(&arr[1 * sizeof(int)], &item1.lon, sizeof(int)); memcpy(&arr[2 * ...


3

It's undefined. It's possible that an OpenGL implementation might use a single set of names across textures and buffers, and in that case then it might just work. However, I once called the wrong glDelete on OSX on a title in development and it managed to crash the OS occasionally (required a power cycle), so it's definitely a very dangerous thing to be ...


3

Don't do that. From the docs, glDeleteBuffers silently ignores 0's and names that do not correspond to existing buffer objects. So, it's bad, but it won't necessarily crash your program. Your program may just find some of its buffer objects unexpectedly deleted (well, this will crash your program if you try to map the buffers but don't check for ...


3

I think you can use this onplaying event var vid = document.getElementById("myVideo"); vid.onplaying = function() { alert("The video is now playing"); }; or if you want to check the video is currently buffer you can use onwaiting event more info here http://www.w3schools.com/tags/ref_av_dom.asp


3

This great mapping, popularized by a most valuable member of the community, does exactly what you want: nnoremap gb :ls<CR>:b A more generic approach… Vim uses that non-interactive list to display the result of a number of other useful commands. I've written this simple function to insert the right "stub" each time I press <CR> after one ...


2

If your code generally works correctly, but fails for large data sets, then this could be due to a stack overflow as indicated by @StillLearning in his comment. A usual (default) stack size is 1 MB. When your decryptedLength is 342,792, then you try to allocate 514,188 byte in the following line: char c[dataLength]; Together with other allocations in ...


2

Your REAL problem is that printf is buffered and write is immediate. And so the write goes first. Yes it does send the \r, the terminal reads it and moves to the front of the line. And when the program exits it flushes the STDOUT buffer and prints the printf contents.


2

Try flushing the output stream: Code: #include <stdio.h> #include <unistd.h> int main() { printf("test"); fflush(stdout); write(1, "\r1234", 5); return 0; } Output: 1234


2

A. Is the packed attribute necessary and sufficient condition for sizeof(Digest) to always return the correct size (= 512 bits or 64 bytes)? It is sufficient. B. Is digest->bits[i] a safe operation on all architectures while we keep the packed attribute? I think that you do not understand __attribute__((packed)). Below is what is does ...


2

You usually don't need the best buffer size, which may requires querying the OS for system parameters and do complex estimations or even benchmarking on the target environment, and it's dynamic. Lucky you just need a value that is good enough. I would say a 4K~16K buffer suit most normal usages. Where 4K is the magic number for page size supported by normal ...


2

Use the with construct. with open('file.txt', 'r') as f: print(f.read()) If the file is very large, I suggest iterating over it and printing it a line at a time: with open('file.txt', 'r') as f: for line in f: print(line, end='') Of course, if the file is that large, it's probably not useful to print it to an ordinary console, but this ...


2

I understand that fork() creates an identical process of the currently running process, but where does it start? If fork(2) is successful (i.e. does not return -1), it starts in the line that calls fork(2). fork(2) returns twice: it returns 0 in the child, and a positive number C in the parent, where C is the process ID of the newborn child. The ...


1

This has pretty much always been the case. Zeroing memory adds overhead, so when you create a new Buffer, you see the contents of whatever that chunk of memory contained last. If you need/want to zero out the Buffer, just do buffer.fill(0);


1

Based on Ben Voigt answer, the fact you want cool (assuming that the goal of preferring unsafe) code and fixed size of number you can unroll whole code into simple state machine: {number-to-add, char} -> {incremented char, carry} Approximate code for 'A'-'C' as 0,1,3. may be slightly simplified if tables merged into one (i.e. combining char and index ...


1

errors while creating a menu using fgets... Regarding your code line: while ((c = fgets(stdin)) != '\n' && c != EOF); fgets, prototype is: char *fgets (char Line_Buffer[], int Number_of_Chars, FILE *Stream); Reads characters from the specified input stream into a lineBuffer until end-of-file is encountered, a newline character is ...


1

Firstly, don't do this. Don't try to initialize the input stream until you've got data in the file. As for why it's working when you don't buffer, I believe the problem is with the buffering of the output stream... in the buffered version, you're creating the FileOutputStream which will truncate the file, then wrapping that in a BufferedOutputStream, then ...


1

On a large partition, cluster size is often 32 KB. On a large read / write request, if the system sees that there are a series of contiguous clusters, it will combine them into a single I/O. Otherwise, it breaks up the request into multiple I/O's. I don't know what the maximum I/O size is. On some old SCSI controllers, it was 64 KB or 1 MB - 8 KB (17 or 255 ...


1

So opening a file like that is not a good idea. Just use context managers: with open('file.txt','r') as f: print(f.read())


1

There is no buffering in Process.getInputStream(). There may be buffering in the process itself. The process can't exit until it has flushed its buffers. You are calling Process.waitFor() and then trying to read its output. Your question therefore doesn't make sense, and your code is back to front. You should read all the process's output and then call ...


1

You can use fwrite and fread to write data into file and read from file. Below is sample code for same. #include <stdio.h> struct PointFull { int number; char text[10]; double real_number; }; int main() { struct PointFull data = {1, "Hello!", 3.14159}, read_data; FILE *fout = fopen("file_path", "w"); fwrite(&data, ...


1

You'd rather allocate a buffer of size sizeof(PointFull). Because if size of struct would ever be changed and become bigger than your hardcoded size, then you going to get a bug. Use a local buffer unless you really need to use a dynamic memory. I assume that in your code you don't really need an allocation. It's just that you may easily forget to ...


1

Since you have tagged C++ #include <iostream> #include <fstream> using namespace std; struct PointFull { double lat; double lon; PointFull(double lat_in = 0, double lon_in = 0) : lat(lat_in), lon(lon_in) {} }; int main() { PointFull item(123123, 123123); cout << "Writing to disk" << endl; ...


1

The struct has only one member, so "packing" it makes no sense. There is no padding between members, because there is no other member. You might have wanted to pack the array, but that is unnecessary, since uint32_t is an exact-size type. (It is not required to exist, but for architectures which lack uint32_t, the question is irrelevant.) So if you had ...


1

There are actually a number of ways to work with bytes. And I agree that it's not always easy to pick the best one: the byte[] the java.nio.ByteBuffer the java.io.ByteArrayOutputStream (in combination with other streams) the java.util.BitSet The byte[] is just a primitive array, just containing the raw data. So, it does not have convenient methods for ...


1

c is not going to get bigger just because you increase datalength. You are probably overwriting past the end of c because your initial guess of 1.5 times the compressed size was wrong, causing the fault. (It might be a stack overflow as suggested in another answer here, but I think that 8 MB stack allocations are common nowadays.)


1

There is no limit other than the maximum value of an int. But a read buffer larger than the socket receive buffer is pointless; the excess can never be used.


1

For arbitrary wxStrings you need to serialize them in either UTF-8 or UTF-16 format. The former is a de facto standard for data exchange, so I advise to use it, but you could prefer UTF-16 if you know that your data is biased to the sort of characters that take less space in it than in UTF-8 and if space saving is important for you. Assuming you use UTF-8, ...


1

Because the sound is the same, only with pressure value reversed. Your ear measures the absolute value of the pressure wave, that is the same for a reversed wave. Only when the wave and the reversed one are playing together their sum is 0, and only if played perfectly synchronized.



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