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9

This is not standard c++, but in POSIX, you can send a "kill" signal to kill the running process. This will stop the execution without cleanup such as flushing buffers. Edit: I realized that signals are not only POSIX but actually part of C standard library (and included in the C++ standard library). #include <csignal> // ... std::cout << "Don'...


9

As far as I can tell, there is no standard compliant and clean way to avoid std::cout to flush() before program termination (but, of course, you can use unclean methods, e.g. raising a signal either directly or indirectly). According to cppreference, the actual buffer type controlled by std::cout is implementation defined but derived from std::streambuf, ...


8

Some things to clear. Go is a garbage collected language, which means that memory allocated and used by variables is automatically freed by the garbage collector when those variables become unreachable (if you have another pointer to the variable, that still counts as "reachable"). Freed memory does not mean it is returned to the OS. Freed memory means the ...


6

Package bytes func (*Buffer) Reset func (b *Buffer) Reset() Reset resets the buffer so it has no content. b.Reset() is the same as b.Truncate(0). func (*Buffer) Truncate func (b *Buffer) Truncate(n int) Truncate discards all but the first n unread bytes from the buffer. It panics if n is negative or greater than the length of the ...


6

The answer to your first question is that the alignment of variables in memory is implementation-defined. (See Section 6.2.8 "Alignment of objects" in the C11 draft.) Basically, different compilers may require a different minimum number of bytes to be between two objects in memory. The compiler you used on the Mac packed the two 8-byte buffers right next to ...


6

Quoting C11, chpater §7.21.6.5, The snprintf() function int snprintf(char * restrict s, size_t n,const char * restrict format, ...); [...] If n is zero, nothing is written, and s may be a null pointer. So, in case you pass 0, nothing is written. In case if you pass a -ve value, it may create issues, as the second argument, is of type size_t ...


5

One reason memoryviews are useful is because they can be sliced without copying the underlying data, unlike bytes/str. For example, take the following toy example. import time for n in (100000, 200000, 300000, 400000): data = 'x'*n start = time.time() b = data while b: b = b[1:] print 'bytes', n, time.time()-start for n in (...


5

No dependencies, moderate speed, any version of node Use Martin Thomson's answer, which runs in O(n) time. (See also my replies to comments on his answer about non-optimizations. Using a DataView is slow. Even if you need to flip bytes, there are faster ways to do so.) No dependencies, fastest, node 4.x and later Buffers are Uint8Arrays, so you just ...


5

This is undefined behavior. Your program has a buffer overrun, because it allocates exactly one character, which is sufficient for storing an empty null-terminated string. However, there is memory adjacent to your buffer that has not been allocated to your program. scanf places your input into that memory, because it does not know how long is your string ...


5

The default buffer size is macro constant BUFSIZ defined in stdio.h. The value is implementation dependent. You may use setvbuf() to change the buffering mode (Full/Line/No buffering) and buffer size. Reference: http://en.cppreference.com/w/c/io


5

You can see that the address passed to gets is -0x28(%ebp). Since the return address is at 4(%ebp) you need to input 44 bytes of padding followed by the required address. The ret instruction of course should not be entered, since that does not go onto the stack and is already in the code. That's what is going to pop the overwritten return address.


5

The paper Design Issues and Tradeoffs for Write Buffers describes the purpose of write buffers as follows: In a system with a write-through first-level cache, a write buffer has two essential functions: it absorbs processor writes (store instructions) at a rate faster than the next-level cache could, thereby preventing processor stalls; and it ...


5

I would recommend you :set autoread in your ~/.vimrc: When a file has been detected to have been changed outside of Vim and it has not been changed inside of Vim, automatically read it again.


5

Because it can be used to read arbitrary data, not just text. Take e.g. the std::istream::read function, it also takes a char* argument, but can be used to read arbitrary data, including binary data. You would not expect it to add a string terminator when reading from a binary file?


5

Try: #include <stdio.h> #include <unistd.h> int main() { for(int i = 0;i < 3;i++) { printf("."); fflush(stdout); sleep(1); } } printf() prints to stdout which is bufferred. Flush out the buffer after each printf(). << flush; is the C++ equivalent to this.


5

Yes it is safe. itoa will just overwrite the memory, and insert a null terminator at the end. It is this null terminator which makes it safe (assuming of course that your array is large enough) Consider the following: int iInt = 12345; char pBuf[10]; itoa(iInt, pBuf, 10); At this point, pBuf will look something like this in memory: +---+---+---+---+---+...


4

There are actually a number of ways to work with bytes. And I agree that it's not always easy to pick the best one: the byte[] the java.nio.ByteBuffer the java.io.ByteArrayOutputStream (in combination with other streams) the java.util.BitSet The byte[] is just a primitive array, just containing the raw data. So, it does not have convenient methods for ...


4

A very simple way to get ahead is to stop trying to make it faster. There is no point, serial port data rates are very, very low and modern computers are very, very fast. Your Read() call only ever returns a single byte, rarely 2. Note that this is hard to see, when you debug and single-step through the code then you'll artificially slow down your program ...


4

:b# Opens the previously opened buffer. Repetitive use of the command toggles between the buffers. Thanks to Related questions on this site!


4

You don't need a heartbeat, or fixed size messages for delivery confirmation. If you need to ensure delivery, you need an application level acknowledgement. If you need to ensure delivery of the correct message, you'll need to include a unique message ID to acknowledge. If you need to ensure that the message is unaltered, you'll need to include a checksum or ...


4

A UDP datagram has to fit inside a single IP packet. The Total Length field in the IP header is 16 bits, so the maximum length (including the IP and UDP headers) is 65535 bytes. The UDP header also has a 16-bit Length field. The UDP Length field includes the UDP header, not the IP header, but since the entire UDP datagram has to fit in the payload of an IP ...


4

If you need to parse a large XML file, I suggest combining XMLReader with DOM. Use XMLReader to get the chunk element node, expand it into DOM and use Xpath to fetch the details from the chunk. $reader = new XMLReader; $reader->open($file); $dom = new DOMDocument; $xpath = new DOMXpath($dom); // look for the first chunk while ($reader->read() &&...


4

You can create a data structure based on a System.Collections.Generic.Queue<T> to store the variable of each frame. The advantage over an Array is that you do not need to move each variable on each frame, just add the latest one. This makes it an O(1) operation, rather than O(n). class History<T> { Queue<T> data; public int ...


4

According to OpenGL's documentation, glBufferData() needs a pointer to the data (i.e. an array, i.e. the coordinates of the vertices). Let's first have a look at glm::vec3's implementation. If you check out glm's Github repo, you'll see that, depending on your compilation flags, glm::vec3 is a typedef of highp_vec3 which is a typedef of tvec3<float, ...


4

You need to create a string variable to concatenate all the chunks in, and then use your decoder at the end. Something like this: var text = ''; res.on('data', function(chunk) { text += chunk; }); res.on('end', function() { var decoder = new StringDecoder('utf8'); var result = decoder.write(text); // Do something with the result });


4

Making stdin or stdout completely unbuffered can make your program perform worse if it handles large quantities of input / output from and to files. Most I/O requests will be broken down as system calls on a byte by byte basis. Note that buffering does not cause printf, scanf and getchar to not be executed: printf output to the final destination can just be ...


4

test is a float pointer, sizeof(tmp) is byte in size. Pointer arithmetic will cause you to go to a wrong offset. try: memcpy(test + ((sizeof(tmp)/sizeof(tmp[0]))*1), tmp, sizeof(tmp))


4

When you create your bytearray from the array.array, it is treating it as an iterable of ints, not as a buffer. You can see this because: >>> bytearray(a1) bytearray(b'\x01\x03\x02\x05\x04') >>> bytearray(buffer(a1)) bytearray(b'\x01\x00\x00\x00\x03\x00\x00\x00\x02\x00\x00\x00\x05\x00\x00\x00\x04\x00\x00\x00') That is, creating a ...


4

As you have already detected the StreamEncoder used by OutputStreamWriter has a buffer size of 8KB and there is no interface to change that size. But the following snippet gives you a way to obtain a Writer for a OutputStream which internally also uses a StreamEncoder but now has a user-defined buffer size: String charSetName = ... CharsetEncoder encoder = ...


4

The correct approach at recording the video without frame drops is to isolate the two tasks (frame acquisition, and frame serialization) such that they don't influence each other (specifically so that fluctuations in serialization don't eat away time from capturing the frames, which has to happen without delays to prevent frame loss). This can be achieved ...



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