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17

All stdio.h functions for reading from a FILE may exhibit either "buffered" or "unbuffered" behavior, and either "echoing" or "non-echoing" behavior. What controls these things is not which function you use, but settings on the stream and/or its underlying file descriptor. The standard library function setvbuf can be used to enable or disable buffering of ...


17

The :checktime command is designed for this very purpose. It will prompt you to reload any buffers that have changed; if you wish to skip the prompt, you can do :set autoread beforehand (you'll still get a prompt on buffers with local unsaved changes). It also avoids the syntax highlighting issue mentioned by Steven Lu on the accepted answer; :bufdo turns ...


15

This is not how you initialize an array, but for: 1. char buf[10] = ""; is equivalent to char buf[10] = {0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0}; 2. char buf[10] = " "; is equivalent to char buf[10] = {' ', 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0}; 3. char buf[10] = "a"; is equivalent to char buf[10] = {'a', 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0}; As you can see, no random ...


12

Look here for an answer. The basic idea is that you want cpython.array.array and cpython.array.clone (not cython.array.*): from cpython.array cimport array, clone # This type is what you want and can be cast to things of # the "double[:]" syntax, so no problems there cdef array[double] armv, templatemv templatemv = array('d') # This is fast armv = ...


10

You might be thinking that this $| = TRUE; Sets $| to a true value. This is however wrong. If you were to enable warnings, you would get the following warning: Argument "TRUE" isn't numeric in scalar assignment And you would see that $| is in fact 0 (false). This is because TRUE is a bareword (unless some module with constants are loaded), which is ...


10

I really can recommend reading the documentation: A Logger represents an active logging object that generates lines of output to an io.Writer. Each logging operation makes a single call to the Writer's Write method. A Logger can be used simultaneously from multiple goroutines; it guarantees to serialize access to the Writer. See ...


9

If buffer is a local variable, then you try to allocate the array on the stack. The stack is normally in the low megabyte range (as in one to four). You try to allocate over four megabytes, which will not work. The easy way to solve this is to allocate it dynamically off the heap: char* buffer = new char[size + 1]; // Do operations on `buffer` delete[] ...


9

new Buffer("250001000192CD0000002F6D6E742F72", "hex")


9

What's happening is not that the code is running out of order, but that the prompt isn't getting displayed to the terminal immediately. Internally, anything you output is stored in an IO buffer by the operating system. Periodically, the buffer is emptied and its contents are displayed on the terminal (it is flushed). On most systems, the terminal is is line ...


8

Since Guava 15.0 (released September 2013) there's EvictingQueue: A non-blocking queue which automatically evicts elements from the head of the queue when attempting to add new elements onto the queue and it is full. An evicting queue must be configured with a maximum size. Each time an element is added to a full queue, the queue automatically ...


8

std::cin doesn't do anything special. Like all file input, it emits a system level read (read in Unix, ReadFile in Windows), for enough bytes to fill its buffer (usually something well over 1K today). It is the system which detects that the input is from a keyboard, and behaves differently: from a file, the system will read as many bytes as are available, ...


7

This memcpy() suffers another problem: what happens if one or both buffers are not on a proper boundary? This could affect performance significantly or, on some architectures, make code not even run. Another common problem (but not here) is dealing with buffers whose length is not a multiple of the width of the native (uint32) type. The reason your example ...


6

Try this as the starting point, it needs package popwin. (require 'popwin) (popwin-mode 1) (generate-new-buffer "special-buffer") (setq eab/special-buffer-displaedp nil) (setq eab/special-buffer "special-buffer") (add-to-list 'popwin:special-display-config `(,eab/special-buffer :width 20 :position left :stick t)) (defun ...


6

Like @RusAlex I don't like plug-ins. I also like to know what code I enter actually does. nmap ,d :b#<bar>bd#<CR> In short this adds a key mapping to vim's normal mode waiting for key sequence ,d. When executed this switches to a previously open buffer and attempts to delete the buffer you switched away from. Deleting an off-screen buffer ...


6

First off, stdin and stdout are your standard input and output streams that most languages have. If you were to run php though the console you could create a script like this: $input = fopen("php://stdin", "r"); $line = trim(fgets($input)); echo $line; or $line = trim(fgets(STDIN)); echo $line; These scripts will both open the standard console input ...


6

From log.go: func (l *Logger) Output(calldepth int, s string) error { now := time.Now() // get this early. var file string var line int l.mu.Lock() defer l.mu.Unlock() // ... Rest omitted Since pretty much all package log output functions go through Output, and there's a mutex in Output it's safe to say they're concurrency-safe.


6

This minimal example of blocking, notice the = : module test( input data_in, clk, output data_out ); reg [2:0] temp; always @(posedge clk) begin temp[2] = data_in; temp[1] = temp[2]; temp[0] = temp[1]; end assign data_out = temp[0]; endmodule creates 1 Flip-Flop: While non-blocking, notice the <=: module test( input data_in, clk, ...


6

I will start by saying that I feel pthreads conditions and mutexes were not really necessary here, nor was non-blocking I/O the best reaction to the problems you describe. In my opinion, the problems you describe with your condition- and mutex-less version are symptoms of forgetting to close() assiduously the ends of your pipes, with the result that a copy ...


5

Node Stream Buffer is obviously designed for use in testing; the inability to avoid a delay makes it a poor choice for production use. Gabriel Llamas suggests streamifier in this answer: how a wrap a buffer as a stream2 Readable stream?


5

Sadly Chrome - like other HTML5 browsers - tries to be smart about what it's downloading and avoids unnecessary bandwidth usage... this means that sometimes we're left with a sub-optimal experience (ironically youTube suffers from this so much that there are not extensions to force more pre-buffering!) That said, I've not found this to be required too often ...


5

You can't initialize an array with the return value from a function. You could use a pointer instead of an array: char *str = GetBuffer(); Or you could use strcpy() or a relative — but there are buffer overflow risks: char str[512]; strcpy(str, GetBuffer()); Your GetBuffer() function also has a lot of problems. char *GetBuffer(void) { int idx = ...


5

memoryview objects are great when you need subsets of binary data that only need to support indexing. Instead of having to take slices (and create new, potentially large) objects to pass to another API you can just take a memoryview object. One such API example would be the struct module. Instead of passing in a slice of the large bytes object to parse out ...


5

On Mac OS X Terminal this functionality is already built in to the Terminal Application as View->Clear Scrollback (Default is CMD+K). So you can re-assign this as you like with Apple's Keyboard shortcuts. Just add a new shortcut for Terminal with the command "Clear Scrollback". (I use CMD+L, because it's similar to CTRL+L to clear the current screen ...


5

At issue here is buffering by the child process. Your subprocess code already works as well as it could, but if you have a child process that buffers its output then there is nothing that subprocess pipes can do about this. I cannot stress this enough: the buffering delays you see are the responsibility of the child process, and how it handles buffering has ...


5

If your cursor is on the word you want to replace with the contents of the unnamed register, you can use viwp. v switches to visual mode, iw selects the inner word, and p puts the contents of the register in its place. In practice, when I need to replace one word (function name, etc.) with another, I'll move to the one to use as a replacement, yiw to yank ...


5

byte slices should support pretty optimized resizing (i.e. reserving more bytes than needed, not copying if they can, growing exponentially, the copying code is not written in go but part of the runtime, etc). so you can use append and see how it works. Another, more idiomatic approach, is using bufio.Reader to wrap the connection, and it will handle all ...


5

Take a look at the description for bytes.NewBuffer: http://golang.org/pkg/bytes/#NewBuffer Sounds like you can create a 16MB byte slice and use it to initialize the buffer.


5

I get a debug error saying "CRT detected that the application wrote to memory after end of heap buffer" I have no idea what that means I notice you did not actually ask a question. "Writing after end of a heap buffer?" is a sentence fragment, not a question. So I'll make up a question that you should have asked. What does that error mean? Suppose ...


4

It is good that the class Buffer handles itself the allocation and destruction. If you want to allocate and destroy it manually just do this: vector<cl::Buffer> mybuffer; Then simply to create a memory zone: mybuffer.push_back(cl::Buffer(/*constructor parameters*/)); To destroy it: mybuffer.clear(); And the good thing is that if you forget to ...


4

You can increase the size of the buffer by using a call to setvbuf.



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