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1

While using the raster like suggested in the other answers is usually faster than using getRGB()/setRGB(), there's nothing fundamentally wrong with your approach. The problem is that the getRGB()/setRGB() methods work with ARGB values, not just RGB. So when your myColor() method leaves the alpha component 0, this basically means the color will be 100% ...


0

downcast is allowed, but it must a actual instance of the child: class A { String name = "a"; A(){}; } class B extends A { } public class Main { public static void main(String[] args) { A a = new B(); // must a b instance B b = new B(); b = (B)a; System.out.println(b.name); } }


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You can do it using the raster: BufferedImage imsrc = ... // The source image, RGBA BufferedImage imres = ... // The resulting image, RGB or BGR WritableRaster wrsrc = imsrc.getRaster() ; WritableRaster wrres = imres.getRaster() ; for (int y=0 ; y < image.getHeight() ; y++) for (int x=0 ; x < image.getWidth() ; x++) { wrres....


-1

Your issue is that you are trying to set the Pixel of a brand new BufferedImage, without having any associated Sample/Pixel Data for that BufferedImage. What you need is a Raster specifically WritableRaster to write your pixels. https://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/awt/image/WritableRaster.html This class extends Raster to provide pixel ...


0

As suspected, the problem is that you convert the color values from linear RGB to gamma-corrected/sRGB values when setting the RGB values to the BufferedImage, but the reverse transformation (back to linear RGB) is not done when you put the values back into the Color array. Either change the line (inside the double for loop): sourceImage.setRGB(x + i, y + ...


1

We should not forget a TwelveMonkeys Library It contains a really impressive filter collection. Usage example: BufferedImage input = ...; // Image to resample int width, height = ...; // new width/height BufferedImageOp resampler = new ResampleOp(width, height, ResampleOp.FILTER_LANCZOS); BufferedImage output = resampler.filter(input, null);


1

instead of int pixel = pixels_raw[i * width + j]; it should be int pixel = pixels_raw[i * height + j]; or int pixel = pixels_raw[j * width + i];. Consider you have image of width = 2x and height = x. Then the array size is 2x^2, while the maximum index you request for is (2x - 1) * 2x + x - 1 = 4x^2 - x - 1, which is more than 2x^2 for x > 2


0

This is the code I have used and tested , it works , it creates two png files inside the res folder(change it to your folder) one for my primary and the other for the secondary screen . i had also printed the Bounds information about the Displays , if you want both displays in one image , just add the width of both monitors and you will have it public ...


1

Send the image across as a PNG: // BufferedImage -> byte sequence ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream(); ImageIO.write(img, "PNG", baos); byte[] imageData = baos.toByteArray(); // byte sequence -> BufferedImage ByteArrayInputStream bais = new ByteArrayInputStream(imageData); BufferedImage img = ImageIO.read(bais);


1

Basically a BufferedImage is an array. The pixels are stored into the DataBuffer, which is an array. BufferedImage source = //... switch ( source.getType() ) { case BufferedImage.TYPE_BYTE_GRAY : case BufferedImage.TYPE_3BYTE_BGR : case BufferedImage.TYPE_4BYTE_ABGR : final byte[] bb = ((DataBufferByte)source.getRaster()....


0

Credit goes to both Ian and CConard96. The problem was, while the class I was trying to send over was serializable, the references it made were not. In order to reduce what I was sending over the socket (and thus simplify it so that less needed to be serializable) I was able to fix the problem by using static references, eliminating them (the non-serialized ...


0

The Handler appears to be this which is not serializable. You will need to make it transient like the BufferedImage.


0

Just pass your ByteArrayOutputStream to ImageIO.createImageOutputStream(...) like this: // The important part: Create in-memory stream ByteArrayOutputStream compressed = new ByteArrayOutputStream(); ImageOutputStream outputStream = ImageIO.createImageOutputStream(compressed); // NOTE: The rest of the code is just a cleaned up version of your code // ...


1

Use GlassPane Luke import java.awt.BorderLayout; import java.awt.Color; import java.awt.Graphics; import java.awt.event.ActionEvent; import java.awt.event.ActionListener; import java.awt.event.FocusEvent; import java.awt.event.FocusListener; import java.awt.event.MouseAdapter; import javax.swing.JButton; import javax.swing.JFrame; import javax.swing.JPanel;...


0

BufferedImage limit is the same limit of having a byte[Integer.MAX_VALUE] due to limitations in the Raster class (ref). You also have the overhead of the header which is platform and implementation dependent. That's why I recommend a safety buffer of the length of a long. (Integer.MAX_VALUE - 8) / 4 should be a good safe limit. NOTE: You MUST account for ...


0

I've made some performance test and this is a bit more efficient than using AffineTransform: public static BufferedImage flipHoriz(BufferedImage image) { BufferedImage newImage = new BufferedImage(image.getWidth(), image.getHeight(), BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_ARGB); Graphics2D gg = newImage.createGraphics(); gg.drawImage(image, image.getHeight(), 0,...


2

Because you are rotating the image of 180 degrees, not flipping it. Use the AffineTransform.getScaleInstance(-1, 1); instead. EDIT: From here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/9559043/1542532 // Flip the image horizontally tx = AffineTransform.getScaleInstance(-1, 1); tx.translate(-image.getWidth(null), 0); You must also translate the image because the scale ...


0

I looked around a bit and found that other people have had a similar problem. On my end when testing this I got a strangely colored image, not a black image. This problem is caused because ImageIO is reading the image wrong. Here is what I have come up with which works, but since I could not replicate your problem and get a black image this may not work ...


1

To return bytes as the response in Ring you need to provide either java.io.File or java.io.InputStream as the body content: (defn jpeg-response [image-data] (-> image-data (ring.util.response/response) (ring.util.response/content-type "image/jpeg"))) I haven't found a way to obtain an InputStream from BufferedImage directly without creating ...


0

You can use something called get current directory. This will get the folder path that the project is working off of. You can use it like so: System.getProperty("user.dir") Just add the image to the correct folder and then add the path and you're golden.


0

Let's take an example. Here is a small directory structure main |---MyClass.java |---myfile.png So main is package. You will need a class to reference any resource. Here I am using MyClass. public Image getImage() throws IOException{ return ImageIO.read(MyClass.class.getResource("myfile.png")); }


1

This m1.render(handler.getGame().getGraphics()) is massively wrong. The rendering of the meteors should be done in the render method and use the same Graphics context as the other elements, so they are all rendered in the same pass getGraphics should never be used, as it provides a reference to the Graphics context outside of the normal painting cycle, ...


2

As @FiReTiTi says, you should use the getRaster() method instead of the getData() method, unless you really want a copy of the image data. However, that is not the cause of the exception. The problem is that your double array only allocates space for a single band (similarly, FiReTiTi's version works, because he explicitly leaves the last parameter 0, only ...


-1

Do it using the raster: public static double[] createArrFromIm(BufferedImage im){ int imWidth = im.getWidth(); int imHeight = im.getHeight(); double[] imArr = new double[imWidth* imHeight]; for (int y=0, nb=0 ; y < imHeight ; y++) for (int x=0 ; x < imWidth ; x++, nb++) imArr[nb] = im.getRaster().getSampleDouble(x, ...


0

You probably read your file with the wrong encoding. Try to replace File f = new File("/home/vipul/Desktop/123.txt"); BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(f)); by Reader reader = new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream("/home/vipul/Desktop/123.txt"), "utf-8"); BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(...


1

I have found the solution for my problem: import java.awt.Color; import java.awt.Font; import java.awt.FontMetrics; import java.awt.Graphics2D; import java.awt.RenderingHints; import java.awt.image.BufferedImage; import java.io.BufferedReader; import java.io.File; import java.io.FileReader; import java.io.IOException; import javax.imageio.ImageIO; public ...


1

You are saving your file in a string. Even if you append a lineSeparator after each line img doesn't know what newline character is. You have to split your data yourself and call drawString for each line. Example : public class TextToGraphics { public static void main(String[] args) { try { String storeData = ""; String data = ""; ...


1

I agree with the solutions proposed by haraldK. 18Kx24K can easily be load into the memory. But as you go pixel by pixel, you can also use a BigBufferedImage that was presented into this post. The image is not loaded into the memory, but stored into a file.



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