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98

Bitbucket already supports marking issues on commit using the Issues service. The issues service scans commit messages for commands which will automatically change the state of the relevant issue on the tracker. [snip] Examples: "... fixes #4711 ..." # marks issue as resolved "... reopening bug 4711..." # ...


92

Google is calling it Chromium on Google Code The Chromium Bug Reporting Page is there and has the link to submit bugs listed. (Google Account Required)


87

As other people have said here, you can't see the bugs that other people have reported to Apple. However, I recently read that Apple uses multiple bug reports for the same issue as an indicator of the severity or priority of a bug or request (see this blog post). So while I generally agree with you that it's better to search first and try to avoid duplicate ...


82

Because JIRA is much, much more powerful. Bugzilla is bug tracking. That is the beginning and the end. Bugzilla has a very primitive UI. Bugzilla has very primitive reporting. Bugzilla has no extensibility. JIRA is bug, issue, feature, task tracking, and project management. Very nice, highly usable UI. Rich and extensive reporting. Highly extensible. ...


76

First, look at these Ohloh metrics: Trac: 44 KLoC, 10 Person Years, $577,003 Bugzilla: 54 KLoC, 13 Person Years, $714,437 Redmine: 171 KLoC, 44 Person Years, $2,400,723 Mantis: 182 KLoC, 47 Person Years, $2,562,978 What do we learn from these numbers? We learn that building Yet Another Bug Tracker is a great way to waste resources! So here ...


66

One hair in soup is too many and in head too few. It all depends


53

Beware! jordan above answered correctly, but there's a "gotcha". Jira really begins to be useful only after you customize it, in my recent experience. My colleague at work (next cubicle, in fact) has put in hundreds of hours customizing Jira to our needs. It has become a critical tool in our development infrastructure, and I think it has been worth it, but ...


49

Each person will probably tell you that their favorite DVCS is the best for you. I would tell you Mercurial is the best! ;-) But that's crap. You definitevely need a DVCS, but try them all, or at least the mostly used ones, and make your choice by yourself. Choosing the DVCS that you know a guru for is also a sensible choice, BTW. I'd recommend trying (or ...


49

We use something like this (in practice the meanings are a bit fuzzier): Bugs: 1. Blocker - Reserved for catastrophic failures - exceptions, crashes, corrupt data, etc. that (a) prevent somebody from completing their task, and (b) have no workaround. These should be extremely rare. They must be fixed immediately (same-day) and deployed as hotfixes. 2. ...


46

FogBugz has a student/startup edition that's free indefinitely, for 2 or less users.


43

Might I suggest a rather new version control called fossil. This is not a me too project, it is written by Dr. Richard Hipp, same guy who did SQLite. The whole repository is a SQLite file, so it is very solid. You have a wiki and a ticket system built in. You can have many users with varying rights, so you can for example give your users right to issue ...


42

You can do this in Excel: Open the work items in Excel, via: right click a query in Team Explorer -> open in Excel multi-select some work items in a WIT result pane, then right click -> open in Excel load Excel, use Team -> Import to load a predefined query open a *.xls file that is already bound to TFS Make your bulk edits Click the Publish button on ...


39

I would want to turn the question around. WHY on earth would you want to build your own? If you need some extra fields, go with an existing package that can be modified. Special report? Tap into the database and make it. Believing that it isn't difficult? Try then. Spec it up, and see the list of features and hours grow. Then after the list is complete, ...


38

We add the issue number in svn commit message and it's recognized automatically. svn ci -m "incorrect encoding fixed (refs #2345)" Later you'll be able to see it in the issue #2345. It doesn't show up right away, I guess redmine checks periodically for repository changes - but if you go to Repository tab and then to the issue, the change should be shown ...


37

I too was looking for an answer to this and thought I'd add my findings to this question so I can find them again later (and hopefully they're of use to someone else too) The URL of the SOAP API is $(MANTIS_URI)/api/soap/mantisconnect.php (e.g. if your Mantis is usually accessed at http://localhost/mantis/ then go to http://localhost/mantis/api/soap/...


37

Issue tracking systems usually integrate more with customers and customer issues. An issue could be "help me install this" or "How do I get the fubar into the flim flam." They could even be something like "I need an evalutation key for your software". Bug tracking systems help you keep track of wrong or missing things from the program. When looking at ...


36

Two bug trackers I know: BugTracker.NET BugTracker.NET is a free, open-source, web-based bug tracker or customer support issue tracker written using ASP.NET, C#, and Microsoft SQL Server (or its free cousin, SQL Server Express). BugNET BugNET is an issue tracking and project issue management solution built using the ASP.NET web ...


36

The best we have right now is OpenRadar. Note that it is completely 3rd party, meaning Apple doesn't monitor it and it requires people to submit bug reports twice (once on Apple's Radar and once on OpenRadar).


34

I think you'll find that your team will like either Trac or Redmine more than Bugzilla or Mantis. Both integrate nicely with Subversion. Both include wiki, forums, project management features... Quick overview: Trac: Very widely used and loved, written in python, huge community, lots of "plugins". A common complaint is that it doesn't support ...


34

The difference could be clearer from the following example. Suppose you had a production issue today that affected 5 customers, but was caused by a single software defect. In your issue-tracking system, you opened 5 tickets and started tracking what each customer reported, what was communicated to them, when the software patch was applied, etc. You can ...


30

Working offline absolutely makes sense for Git. You can browse your entire history, make commits, do merges, create branches, essentially do everything related to your repository offline. Furthermore, you can set up a central repository which is the "master", that is you will push all your changes to that central repository. That way you always know where ...


28

Personally, I use Excel. (Wait, come back, I'm not crazy!) For a bigger / team project, I've gotten a ton of mileage out of Bugzilla, but that tends to be kind of overkill for a one-person project. But, a well-organized spreadsheet, with columns for things like "status", "description", "code module", "resolved date," etc, gets you pretty close to what you'...


28



23

Of course you can edit this list - if you have the necessary permission, there should be the list of watchers at the right hand side of the issue's detail page, with a link to add watchers opening a dropdown list.


23

Verify the steps used to produce the error Oftentimes the people reporting the error, or the people reproducing the error, will do something wrong and not end up in the same state, even if they think they are. Try to walk it through with the reporting party. I've had a user INSIST that the admin privileges were not appearing correctly. I tried reproducing ...


22

I've used Bugzilla and Mantis, but I prefer Mantis' simplicity. It's not as feature rich as Bugzilla but, I remember fighting with Bugzilla a lot more. Mantis is the kind of thing you can setup once then leave.


22

My $WORKPLACE just switched from Bugzilla to JIRA (after many years of use; we had to migrate ~12000 bugzilla issues). My initial impression with JIRA: lots of features and options has a more "professional" look than Bugzilla it is harder to find your way around it is not as simple to use as Bugzilla it was hard to find my old bugs (we used a "custom field"...


20

Set your TextView's width as android:layout_width="fill_parent" then you can set it programmatically using myTextView.setGravity(Gravity.CENTER)


20

Redmine can do some of what you're asking for. Integration works in one direction, you must reference issues in commit messages, and then this data will be available in redmine. The data is then available in two views. The bug display will include a list of matched commits. The repository display will link commits to bug display pages. Redmine keeps a ...



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