Hot answers tagged

92

The PIL version packaged on pypi (by the author) is incompatible with setuptools and thus not easy_installable. People have created easy_installable versions elsewhere. Currently, you need to specify a find-links URL and use pip get a good package: pip install --no-index -f http://dist.plone.org/thirdparty/ -U PIL By using pip install with the --no-index ...


76

Use Pillow: the "friendly" PIL fork :-) It offers: Full setuptools compatibility Faster release cycle No image code changes that differ from PIL (i.e. it aims to track all PIL image code changes, and make none of its own changes without reporting them upstream.) Windows binaries If PIL ever does exactly what Pillow does, then the fork will die. Until ...


63

I fix this by running auth first, then the rest of my migrations: python manage.py migrate auth python manage.py migrate


30

You could also try: pip install --upgrade setuptools as documented here http://askubuntu.com/questions/318824/how-to-solve-pkg-resources-versionconflict-error-during-bin-python-bootstrap-py/322701#322701


24

You have the distribute fork of setuptools installed in your site packages, but your bootstrap.py is trying to install buildout 2.2.0, which uses the new merged setuptools 0.7 or newer egg. The distribute fork of setuptools was merged back into the setuptools project and the transition is causing some pain. Your options are: Tell bootstrap to use an ...


24

I'm not sure about buildout, however, for setuptools/distribute, you specify version info with the comparison operators (like ==, >=, or <=). For example: install_requires = ['django-pipeline==1.1.22', 'south>=0.7']


24

2.0.0 just got released. The old bootstrap.py is not compatible with 2.0.0 but downloads it by default. You can get the v2 bootstrap.py from here, or use the code below if you want to stick with the old version. python bootstrap.py -v 1.7.0 edit: older versions of v1 bootstrap.py don't allow version forcing. The up-to-date version here does.


21

Here's a Python script I made that I use with all my heavy JavaScript projects. I'm using YUICompressor, but you can change the code to use another compressor. import os, os.path, shutil YUI_COMPRESSOR = 'yuicompressor-2.4.2.jar' def compress(in_files, out_file, in_type='js', verbose=False, temp_file='.temp'): temp = open(temp_file, 'w') ...


16

Summary: Pip only installs python packages and there's more you need to do, obviously. You can do most of the extra work in buildout with the advantage that buildout does it for you both locally and on the server. Fabric has to do less, that way. The drawback is buildout's extra complexity, so if a couple of custom fabric commands is enough for you, that ...


16

You could add configuration sections to your zope.conf file via the zope-conf-additional section of the plone.recipe.zope2instance part: [instance] recipe = plone.recipe.zope2instance ... zope-conf-additional = <product-config foobar> spam eggs </product-config> Any named product-config section is then available as a simple ...


14

I found from the buildout docs that bin/buildout annotate was what I was looking for.


13

On my environment, I fix this running makemigrations on all apps that have relationship with django.contrib.auth.models: manage.py makemigrations app_with_user_relation manage.py migrate


12

"Why does buildout delete my instance/etc and Extensions folder each time it is run?" -> Because that's what buildout is made for: to build automatically the parts, the way it is defined in the buildout-configuration-file. Not deleting former dirs and files would easily result in conflicts and errors, I guess. Can anynone confirm? "How do people deal with ...


12

Here are instructions on how to setup your own PyPi mirror. The homepage of this project is here. There also seems to be a growing number of mirrors out there. For instructions on how to setup your own package index, check out this blog post where one solution is explained at the end. Then you can also host your own internal packages in there. The advantage ...


11

Your version of wget is too old. wget started to support SNI (Server Name Indication) only since version 1.14 and that TLS extension is needed to be presented the correct certificate on pypi.python.org.


11

You have 3 options, depending on where you want your buildout configuration to live and what options you have to check out your git repository. Note that as far as Python is concerned, the resulting egg is exactly the same. The only difference between a development egg and a "normal" egg is that a development egg overrides any version requirements set ...


11

At the core, buildout and pip+virtualenv do the same. They both use python packages, install them, isolate them from the rest of your python environment, handle dependencies (through setup.py) and so on. Buildout does more. Which, naturally, means a bit more configuration than with pip. You'll have to figure out whether the extra configuration is worth the ...


10

I also had the same issue I solved it by using these : python manage.py migrate auth python manage.py migrate Then migrate does its job


10

You are misunderstanding how buildout works. Normally, buildout will try and find all eggs needed to build your parts for you. It does so by searching for the eggs (optionally pinned to specific versions) in your site-packages, on PyPI or in any additional web locations (using find-links). It will do so recursively until all dependencies are met. So if you ...


10

Generally speaking, this is done now-a-days with mr.developer. You can use a buildout like this: [buildout] extends = https://raw.githubusercontent.com/plock/pins/master/plone-4-3 https://raw.githubusercontent.com/plock/pins/master/dev And then add your sources to the auto-checkout parameter in the [buildout] section, and in the [sources] section,...


10

First of all, regardless of installation tool you decide on, start using virtualenv --no-site-packages! That way, python packages are not installed globally and you can easily get back to where you were in old as well as new projects. Now, your comparison is a little bit apples-to-pears as the tools you list are not mutually exclusive. However, I can wholly ...


9

Distribute is a new fork of setuptools (easy_install), which should also be considered. Even Guido recommends it. Buildout is orthogonal to the packaging --- you can use buildout with distribute.


9

I've done quiet a bit of research on this topic(a couple of weeks worth) before settling down on using buildout for all of my projects. DistUtils and EasyInstall in addition to Buildout! The difficulty in creating one place to compare all of these tools is that they're all part of a same tool chain and are used together to create a predictable, ...


9

You can tell buildout if you want to use site-pakages or not with one of these two directives: include-site-packages and allowed-eggs-from-site-packages From buildout documentation: You can then use include-site-packages = false and exec-sitecustomize = false buildout options to eliminate access to your Python's site packages and not execute its ...


9

What you want is to edit your buildout to create a second instance to run. You'll need to add a ZEO server too, plus the necessary changes to your setup to have the instances connect to that port. You cannot just change the configuration file to start a second instance on a different port otherwise; to run multiple instances you need, at the very least, a ...


8

You don't need virtualenv: buildout already provides an isolated environment, just like virtualenv. As an example, look at files buildout generates in the bin directory. They'll have something like: import sys sys.path[0:0] = [ '/some/thing1.egg', # and other things ] So the sys.path gets completely replaced with what buildout wants to ...


8

In theory, you should just be able to add PIL and psycopg2 to your eggs directive: eggs = myproject PIL psycopg2 This works on some systems and in some situations. However, there are two problems that can prevent it from working everywhere, and especially on OSX: PIL's packaging is... weird in some way, and that can make installing it ...


8

You can also use a mirror. Put this in the "[global]" section of "~/.pip/pip.conf": index-url = http://d.pypi.python.org/simple/ This is a recent feature as announced here.


8

Buildout specifically supports this scenario. Each part in a buildout can use it's own python interpreter, or you can set one python interpreter globally for all parts. This defaults to the python used to run buildout. To set the python interpreter used, set the python option to the name of a part that contains an executable option. This can be a part that ...


8

When we create a buildout for a customer, we want that buildout to run on arbitrary hosting environments with minimal dependencies, all satisfiable with system packages. By including supervisord in the buildout, we eliminate the need for it to be installed system-wide and can tweak it's parameters finely, without having to ask a system admin to change ...



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