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125

In Python versions prior to 3.0 there are two kinds of strings "plain strings" and "unicode strings". Plain strings (str) cannot represent characters outside of the Latin alphabet (ignoring details of code pages for simplicity). Unicode strings (unicode) can represent characters from any alphabet including some fictional ones like Klingon. So why have two ...


105

int() is a constant expression with a value of 0, so it's a valid way of producing a null pointer constant. Ultimately, it's just a slightly different way of saying int *ptr = NULL;


63

Implicitly defined (by the compiler) default constructor of a class does not initialize members of built-in types. However, you have to keep in mind that in some cases the initialization of a instance of the class can be performed by other means. Not by default constructor, nor by constructor at all. For example, there's a widespread incorrect belief that ...


33

Because int() yields 0, which is interchangeable with NULL. NULL itself is defined as 0, unlike C's NULL which is (void *) 0. Note that this would be an error: int* ptr = int(5); and this will still work: int* ptr = int(0); 0 is a special constant value and as such it can be treated as a pointer value. Constant expressions that yield 0, such as 1 - 1 ...


20

You can't directly add the method to the original type. However, you can subclass the type then substitute it in the built-in/global namespace, which achieves most of the effect desired. Unfortunately, objects created by literal syntax will continue to be of the vanilla type and won't have your new methods/attributes. Here's what it looks like # Built-in ...


18

The expression int() evaluates to a constant default-initialized integer, which is the value 0. That value is special: it is used to initialize a pointer to the NULL state.


17

And so, is the one shown by the example a well-defined behavior? Yes, the behaviour shown in the example is the only behaviour allowed by the standard. That is because std::move doesn't move. The things that move are move constructors and move assignment operators. All std::move does is change an lvalue into an xvalue, so that it can bind to rvalue ...


14

Probably in part because you don't need a literal: you can always write your own :=> as a type infix operator if you want more concise syntax: scala> type :=>[A, B] = PartialFunction[A, B] defined type alias $colon$eq$greater scala> val pf: Int :=> String = { case 5 => "five" } pf: :=>[Int,String] = <function1> scala> ...


13

From n3290 (C++03 uses similar text), 4.10 Pointer conversions [conv.ptr] paragraph 1 (the emphasis is mine): 1 A null pointer constant is an integral constant expression (5.19) prvalue of integer type that evaluates to zero or a prvalue of type std::nullptr_t. A null pointer constant can be converted to a pointer type; the result is the null pointer ...


12

When we write int a;, it doesn't mean that we are creating an object of class int. int a; does indeed create an object in C++. It's an object of type int with indeterminate value if it has automatic storage duration; or with value 0, if it has static storage duration. But there is no "class int" because int is not a class type. int is a: integral ...


11

You need to call the list initializer: class MyList(list): def __init__(self, li): super(MyList, self).__init__(li) Assigning to self in the function just replaces the local variable with the list, not assign anything to the instance: >>> class MyList(list): ... def __init__(self, li): ... super(MyList, ...


10

This isn't a general change for built-in types when moving from Python 2.x to 3.x -- list and int, for example, have the same behaviour in 2.x and 3.x. Only the set type was changed to bring it in line with the other types, as discussed in this bug tracker issue. I'm afraid there is no really nice way to make it behave the old way. Here is some code I was ...


10

What is the definition of built-in that you want to use? Is it built-in the compiler toolset that you have yes, it should. Is it treated specially by the compiler? no, the compiler treats that type as any user defined type. Note that the same can probably be applied to many other languages for which most people will answer yes. One of the focuses of the C++ ...


10

For all practical purposes - no. However for implementations that are technically compliant with the C++ standard, the answer is that it depends whether the object is POD or not and on how you initialize it. According to the C++ standard: MyNonPodClass instance1;//built in members will not be initialized MyPodClass instance2;//built in members will be ...


9

Not directly but you can do the following simplified check public bool IsBulitin(object o) { var type = o.GetType(); return (type.IsPrimitive && type != typeof(IntPtr) && type != typeof(UIntPtr)) || type == typeof(string) || type == typeof(object) || type == typeof(Decimal); } The IsPrimitive check will catch ...


9

In addition to stefaanv's answer, if you're worried about their size, use quint32 and friends. Qt guarantees them to be the same size on all supported platforms. Check out QtGlobal: The header file declares several type definitions that guarantee a specified bit-size on all platforms supported by Qt for various basic types, for example qint8 which is a ...


9

Use a typedef to make a name for your pointer type: typedef int *ip; ip ptr = ip(); The same idea should work for other types that require more than one lexical element (word) to define the name of the type (e.g., unsigned long, long long, unsigned long long *, etc.).


8

signed long long value = -2147483648; 2147483648 cannot be represented in a 32-bit signed integer, so it is converted to an unsigned, then unary minus is applied (which doesn't change anything), and then it is assigned to the signed long long. Use -2147483648LL


8

BitConverter.GetBytes() can convert primitive types to byte arrays.


7

They do the same and take the same amount of time. Also, optimizations on this level are pointless until a profiler proves the opposite. Use what's more readable to you.


7

The brackets are part of the language. They're used to create lists. It's not possible to redefine that (and not desirable either!).


7

Does new[] initialise an array of builtins? It depends: int* = new int[42]; // default initialization: elements not initialized int* = new int[42](); // value initialization: elements are zero initialized Note the terminology: in the first example, the elements are said to be default-initialized, which for built-ins means no initialization is ...


7

Because one of general rules of C++ is that you don't pay for what you don't use. Initializing global objects is relatively cheap because it happens only once at program startup. Initializing local variables would add overhead to every function call, which not everybody would like. So it was decided to make initialization of locals optional, the same way ...


6

For something working in C++98, you can use Boost's value_initialized: (live example) #include <boost/utility/value_init.hpp> ... struct Money { boost::value_initialized<double> amountP, amountG, totalChange; boost::value_initialized<int> twenty, ten, five, one, change; boost::value_initialized<int> quarter, dime, nickel, ...


6

Per § 8.5/7: To default-initialize an object of type T means: — if T is a (possibly cv-qualified) class type (Clause 9), the default constructor for T is called (and the initialization is ill-formed if T has no accessible default constructor); — if T is an array type, each element is default-initialized; — otherwise, no initialization is performed. ...


6

Any POD data (including all fundamental types) will have an unknown value when both: it doesn't have static memory allocation (it's instead created on the stack or with new) it isn't initialized, including empty initialization and/or constructor initialization lists Global/static variables, of all types, are set to zero as part of the startup process ...


6

tuple is an immutable type. It's already created and immutable before __init__ is even called. That is why this doesn't work. If you really want to subclass a tuple, use __new__. >>> class MyTuple(tuple): ... def __new__(typ, itr): ... seq = [int(x) for x in itr] ... return tuple.__new__(typ, seq) ... >>> t ...


6

All strings are basestrings, but unicode strings are not of type str. Try this instead: >>> a=u'aaaa' >>> print isinstance(a, basestring) True >>> print isinstance(a, str) False


6

int and long are C++ types. They don't have a fixed size defined by the standard.



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