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13

This link might be helpful. I'm going to connect ne04j with R in the following days and will try first with the provided link. Hope it helps. I tried it out and it works well. Here is the function that works: First, install and load packages and then execute function: install.packages('RCurl') install.packages('RJSONIO') library('bitops') library('RCurl') ...


12

Bulbs supports three different graph database servers -- Neo4j Server, Rexster, and now Titan. Code specific to each backend server is contained within its own Python package (directory). You should see directories for: neo4jserver, rexster, titan: Bulbs Source Code: https://github.com/espeed/bulbs/tree/master/bulbs Neo4jClient is the low-level adapter ...


11

Consider the RNeo4j driver. The function shown above is incomplete: it cannot return single column data and there is no NULL handling. https://github.com/nicolewhite/RNeo4j


8

Shameless plug... there is also my own ORM which you may also want to checkout: https://github.com/robinedwards/neomodel It's built on top of py2neo, using cypher and rest API calls under hood, i.e no dependency on gremlin.


8

g.vertices.index.lookup(**{"bad:identifier":"value"}) may work ... this is known as unpacking keyword arguments


7

Django is an MVC web framework so you may be interested in that if yours is to be a web application. From the point of view of py2neo (of which I am the author), I am trying to focus hard on performance by using the batch execution mechanism automatically where appropriate as well as providing strong Cypher support. I have also recently put a lot of work ...


6

The most performant way to execute a multi-part transaction is to encapsulate the transaction in a Gremlin script and execute it as a single request. Here's an example of how to do it -- it's from an example app I worked up last year for the Neo4j Heroku Challenge. The project is called Lightbulb: https://github.com/espeed/lightbulb The README describes ...


5

Starting with Neo4j 2.0 the gremlin plugin is no longer bundled. However you can easily build and install that on your own, see https://github.com/neo4j-contrib/gremlin-plugin.


5

Maybe you could take a look on Bulbflow, that allows to create models in Django, Flask or Pyramid. However, it works over a REST client instead of the python-binding provided by Neo4j, so perhaps it's not as fast as the native binding is.


4

The error message states: "No such ServerPlugin: GremlinPlugin". In Neo4j 2.0 the gremlin plugin has been removed from the core product and needs to be installed seperately, you'll find the source at https://github.com/neo4j-contrib/gremlin-plugin. However it seems that blueprints, which gremlin-plugin depends on, is not yet available for Neo4j 2.0. So ...


4

Titan has its own module... >>> from bulbs.titan import Graph >>> g = Graph()


4

Looks like I didn't get the documentation quite right. The <graph-type> should be: com.tinkerpop.rexster.OrientGraphConfiguration You can see the class here: https://github.com/orientechnologies/orientdb/blob/develop/graphdb/src/main/java/com/tinkerpop/rexster/OrientGraphConfiguration.java I've corrected the documentation. As the class is still ...


4

You can add/update an edge's properties, but with graph databases, you cannot update the attributes that make it an edge, i.e. you cannot update its incoming and outgoing vertex IDs or label. Instead, you delete the edge and add a new one. Here are the different ways of getting and edge and updating its properties.. You can get an edge by its ID: >>...


4

Your diagram of: PYTHON OBJECTS ----> BULBS ----> Rexster ---> Titan Graph DB ---> Cassandra DB Looks more or less correct depending on how you want to think of the abstractions involved. You might also define it as: PYTHON OBJECTS ----> BULBS ----> Rexster/Titan ---> Cassandra DB As Rexster basically embeds a Titan instance ...


3

espeed's answer is good. Here's another alternative: gremlin> g = TinkerGraphFactory.createTinkerGraph() ==>tinkergraph[vertices:6 edges:6] gremlin> v1 = g.v(1) ==>v[1] gremlin> v3 = g.v(3) ==>v[3] gremlin> v6 = g.v(6) ==>v[6] gremlin> v1.out.retain([v3]).hasNext() ==>true gremlin> v1.out.retain([v6]).hasNext() ==>false ...


3

TGF is your solution. python example: #!/usr/bin/python import fileinput, re depends = {} for line in fileinput.input(): m = re.match('(.+):\s*(.*)',line) # find every depenency line of the form "<item>: <dependencies>" if m: item = m.group(1) dependency_list = m.group(2) print item,item # node definition ...


3

Maintainer of mogwai here. What version of mogwai are you using? in 0.7.7 there is no return value for setup method and the connection object should not be passed around. In fact when you call setup it creates a connection pool (a synchronous rexpro connection pool since there was no concurrency option specified). So in general, just call setup once for the ...


3

The following thread on the Titan mailing list could be useful to you: Rexster REST API stops responding. However, I don't think they ever managed to solve that issue for the Titan and Rexster developers couldn't reproduce it. This being said, I strongly suggest upgrading to Titan v1.0.0 which uses TinkerPop 3.0+ Gremlin server instead of TinkerPop 2.x ...


3

I would think you could verify vertex creation in several ways: Your switch and device variables should have some data in them, specifically a new vertex identifier should have been generate for them. Inspecting those variables should tell you something about creation. But you specifically asked about the "groovy command line in rexster" which I think ...


3

This is a very tough question, it seems you need design guidance not a quick neo4j question. Depending on how you're using spreading activation, it might be better not to modify the server, but I can't tell because your use case is probably involved. Keep in mind that you can always use neo4j as a graph store, and then put higher-level concepts like ...


3

The easiest way to run algorithms from Python is to use Gremlin (https://github.com/tinkerpop/gremlin/wiki). With Gremlin you can bundle everything into one HTTP request to reduce round-trip overhead. Here's how to execute Gremlin scripts from Bulbs (http://bulbflow.com): >>> from bulbs.neo4jserver import Graph >>> g = Graph() >>&...


3

Neo4j only supports lists that contain primitive types such as string, int, bool, etc (mixed types in a list aren't allowed). Here are the property types Neo4j supports: http://docs.neo4j.org/chunked/preview/graphdb-neo4j-properties.html To store a mixed-type list in Neo4j, you can save it as a JSON document string. Bulbs has a Document Property type ...


3

The URL should include /graphs/ in the path: http://localhost:8182/graphs/dev-db-01/


3

Bulbs was designed to make it easy to work with multiple graph databases. Configure your rexster.xml for each Neo4j database you want to run (each will have a different name and thus a different URL path), and then create a separate Bulbs Config and Graph object for each database: >>> from bulbs.rexster import Graph, Config >>> >>&...


3

There are a couple choices in Python out there right now, based on databases' REST interfaces. As I mentioned in the link @Peter provided, we're working on neo4django, which updates the old Neo4j/Django integration. It's a good choice if you need complex queries and want an ORM that will manage node indexing as well- or if you're already using Django. It ...


2

Concerning the rexster 2.4 problem: You can find a 2.4-branch in https://github.com/triAGENS/blueprints-arangodb-graph, that should work with rexster/gremlin 2.4


2

I've not used the ArangoDB Blueprints implementation, but you definitely have some versioning issues contributing to the problem. According to the pom, it looks like the 1.0.4-SNAPSHOT works with TinkerPop 2.3.0. I would start by making sure you use Gremlin/Rexster 2.3.0 as a first step to solving this problem. As a second step, make sure that the Rexster ...


2

You're mixing up Groovy syntax with Python. actions is a dictionary and action is a dictionary so in Python it should be: 'actions': {'type': 'ACTION_OUTPUT', 'action': {port: actionOutputPort, maxLen: 0}} Note it is usually more convenient (less quotes) to create Python dictionaries using the dict function: 'actions'...


2

The Bulbs 'get_or_create()' method looks up a vertex in the index and creates it if it doesn't exist. You can supply get_or_create() a Python dict of database properties the same way you can with create(). See... http://bulbflow.com/docs/api/bulbs/element/#vertex-proxy https://github.com/espeed/bulbs/blob/master/bulbs/element.py#L584 Here are a few ...


2

The use of in and out is descriptive of the direction of the edge going from one vertex to another. In your case, you have this: switch --> port When you write: g.v(108).out you are telling Gremlin to find the vertex at 108, then walk along edges that point out or away from it. You might also think of out as starting from the tail of the arrow and ...



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