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38

I would rather do it more elegantly like so: $(function(){ $("html").bind("ajaxStart", function(){ $(this).addClass('busy'); }).bind("ajaxStop", function(){ $(this).removeClass('busy'); }); }); CSS: html.busy, html.busy * { cursor: wait !important; } Source: ...


25

It is a bug in both browsers at the moment. More details at both links (in comments as well): http://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=26723 and http://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=20717


16

The window server will show the spinning wait cursor when the frontmost application, or the application that has a window under the mouse pointer, has not responded to events from the window server within a certain window of time. To avoid the spinning wait cursor, an application needs to service events in a timely fashion. There's no way around this ...


14

In addition to the progress dialogs described in the other answers, you can: Add a ProgressBar to your activity, as shown here Use the progress indicator in the title bar of your activity, as shown here Use a RotateAnimation and your own custom image


11

Use Cursor.WaitCursor property. You can use: Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor; and as long as there is some processing going on in a WinForms application, the cursor stays in the WaitCursor state. You can as well use your custom designed cursors: Cursor.Current = new Cursor("C:\\Cursors\\MyWait.cur"); source: ...


10

In summary, I think that the user should be blocked from doing stuff in your app only when the wait interval is very short (2 seconds or less) and the cognitive overhead of doing multi-threading is likely to result in a less stable app. For more detail, see below. For an operation lasting less than 0.1 second, you don't usually need to go asynchronous or ...


8

You need to set the form's UseWaitCursor property to true. (And remember to set it to false again afterwords, preferably in a finally block) You can also set Application.UseWaitCursor to true to apply it to every form.


6

Assuming your application has sufficient hardware resources (which won't always be the case in reality), there's really no reason your app should ever beachball. If it does, figure out what section of code is blocking the user interface (if it's non-intuitive Shark.app will come in handy) and move that to a background thread (or use another strategy to ...


5

The reason is that your app is blocking the UI. As the other posters said, the window manager can notice that you haven't handled events in awhile and put up this UI. Most likely you are doing some IO (such as reading or writing to the disk, or doing network requests) synchronously on the UI (default) thread. A good rule of thumb to keeping your app ...


5

Typically when JS code is being run all other rendering is halted, just like what you're seeing. You can try to use the setTimeout function to allow rendering to occur on your page like so: doStuff(); $('#myDiv').html('Almost done, please wait'); setTimeout(doMoreStuff, 50); Note that doMoreStuff is another function that will do the last part of your ...


5

It's not specifically the busy cursor that is important, but it IS important, absolutely, always to give feedback to the user that something is happening in response to their input. It is important to realize that without a busy cursor, progress bar, throbber, flashing button, swirling baton, dancing clown.. it doesn't matter ANYTHING- if you don't have it, ...


4

I think you may well be right: in a decent asynchronous app, you never need to show a busy cursor. The user can always do something even if the big last operation is completing. That said, sometimes Java apps like Netbeans or Eclipse, or even Visual Studio, hang with no busy cursor and no hope. But in that case, a busy cursor probably wouldn't help much ...


4

You show a busy cursor when the user can not do anything until the operation is completed - including exiting the application. I find it interesting that you don't see busy cursors in Web Browsers - perhaps that why people like them so much. No, wait, I have a better answer. You show a busy cursor when the computer is thinking.


4

One way to disable it is to use the glass pane to block mouse input. For example: import java.awt.Cursor; import java.awt.Dimension; import java.awt.event.ActionEvent; import java.awt.event.MouseAdapter; import javax.swing.*; @SuppressWarnings("serial") public class WaitCursor2 extends JPanel { private static final int PREF_W = 400; private ...


4

The issue 065 from Javaspecialists.eu thoroughly answers your question.


4

try this from setHourglass With ASP.NET pages this is a bit more of a problem to do. You need to employ a little JavaScript. Add this JavaScript between the tags on your ASP.NET web page: Code: function setHourglass() { document.body.style.cursor = 'wait'; } Now you have to tell the web form to run the JavaScript funciton when a post back ...


4

I got inspired from Korayem solution. Javascript: jQuery.ajaxSetup({ beforeSend: function() { $('body').addClass('busy'); }, complete: function() { $('body').removeClass('busy'); } }); CSS: .busy * { cursor: wait !important; } Tested on Chrome, Firefox and IE 10. Cursor changes without moving the mouse. "!important" ...


4

Set STARTF_FORCEOFFFEEDBACK flag in dwFlags member of STARTUP_INFO struct that you pass to CreateProcess().


3

import java.awt.*; import java.awt.event.*; import java.text.SimpleDateFormat; import java.util.Random; import javax.swing.*; import javax.swing.UIManager.LookAndFeelInfo; import javax.swing.table.*; public class TableWithTimer implements ActionListener, Runnable { private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L; private JFrame frame = new ...


3

After searching the internet, I found the answer to my question. The key is to set the cursor on the glasspane of the frame that contains the component which wants to display a busy cursor. I got the idea from the following articles on the net. Wait, Cursor, Wait! An Automatic Wait Cursor: WaitCursorEventQueue I modified my SSCE to make it work for the ...


3

Try to use a progress dialog: http://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/ProgressDialog.html


2

When one hits the Refresh button on a web browser, busy cursor must appear immediately to tell the user to let them know that a page is being loaded. I think it was Don't Make Me Think that said that the tolerable loading time for human is zero second. Google says: Responsive It's possible to write code that wins every performance test in the ...


2

There are two purposes for it: Indicate for the user that something is happening. Indicate for the user that nothing can't be done right now. Busy cursor is better signal about the operation than nothing. For longer lasting operations something better should be used. For example browsers is still operational when a page is being retrieved and there is ...


2

Generally I stay away from the busy cursor for several reasons, including the fact that it is so small on mobile apps. The busy indicator is very easy to use and can be positioned and sized how you like: <s:BusyIndicator id="myBusyIndicator" width="100" height="100" verticalCenter="0" horizontalCenter="0" visible="false"/> Then, when you want to ...


1

Not that I know of off the top of my head. But you can always remove the "click" listener to the components on the page. E.g., myComponent.removeEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, onMouseClickEventDoThis); It's a pain though, since you would have to do this for every visual component. What I've done in the past, is just make the component.enable = false. ...


1

I have no option to add my answer as a comment to SLaks answer, so i post it as an answer In order to force application to set cursor to wait cursor at once, you have to call for Application.DoEvents() method after setting Application.UseWaitCursor, otherwise it might be changed after the lengthy process has been completed ...


1

This doesn't work. I put the function inside the tags as follows: <head> <script type="text/javascript"> function setHourGlass() { document.body.style.cursor = 'wait'; } </script> </head> Then, added the code to the body tag as follows: <body onbeforeunload="setHourglass();" onunload="setHourglass();"> ...


1

Try decreasing the time after which the ProgressTemplate is displayed. By default this is 5 seconds. This behaviour is controlled by the Property: DisplayAfter Specify the number of milliseconds to elapse before showing the progress control, i.e 2000 if you wish to wait for 2 seconds <asp:UpdateProgress DisplayAfter="2000" ...


1

Put your asp:UpdateProgress out side to the asp:UpdatePanel - as below . <asp:UpdatePanel ID="UpdtBank" runat="server"> <ContentTemplate> <div style="text-align:center;"> //My Code is Here </div> </ContentTemplate> </asp:UpdatePanel > <asp:UpdateProgress AssociatedUpdatePanelID="UpdtBank" ...


1

Try setting it on the frame instead of a given component



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