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6

The problem is that leading 0s cause a number to be read as octal. In bash, using $((10#$num)) will force decimal. Thus: num=$(printf "%04d" "$((10#$num + 1))") To work with busybox ash, you'll need to strip the 0s. One way to do this which will work even in busybox ash: while [ "${num:0:1}" = 0 ]; do num=${num:1} done num=$(printf '%04d' "$((num + ...


4

Linux won't let you mess with the LD_LIBRARY_PATH because busybox (probably) has its setuid bit turned on. Busybox has a bunch of common linux commands built into its binary, so it needs setuid.


3

You can use awk with custom field separator like this to get same output: echo 'BeginMiddleEnd' | awk -F 'Begin|End' '{print $2}' Middle


3

This arithmetic expression (( $# != 1 )) is bash syntax. In ash, it's launching 2 nested subshells, then executing the program "$#" with arguments "!=" and "1". Use this instead if [ $# -ne 1 ]


3

Use the watch commad, try this is: watch -n 1 date


3

You can use Buildroot, that's a buildsystem that downloads the linux kernel, manages rootfs, integrates BusyBox, and much much more. From my opinion it's the easiest way to get an embedded Linux/BusyBox system. Here's their homepage: http://buildroot.uclibc.org/


3

WordPress typography features strike again! You're using the wrong kind of quotation marks: -append “root=/dev/ram rdinit=/sbin/init” ^ ^ The indicated characters are, respectively, U+201C LEFT DOUBLE QUOTATION MARK and U+201D RIGHT DOUBLE QUOTATION MARK (i.e, "curly quotes"), not normal quotation marks. Retype the ...


2

I was looking for the same and my busybox doesn't have shutdown, restart or reboot commands. I used poweroff -f because poweroff with no parameters doesn't do anything. Do "ls -la /bin" or a "ls -la /sbin" to see which commands are available on your busybox.


2

An extract of Building embedded Linux Systems book : embutils was written by the author of diet libc with very similar goals. Though it supports many of the most common Unix commands, embutils is still far from being as exhaustive as BusyBox. For example, version 0.18 still lacks find, grep, ifconfig, ps and route. In Contrast to BusyBox however, embutils ...


2

You aren't specifying the files to grep, so it's trying to read STDIN. I think you wanted grep -nr "piece of text" * Note the asterisk is globbed to all files in the current path.


2

Another way requiring Linux and readlink: #!/bin/ash exe=`exec 2>/dev/null; readlink "/proc/$$/exe"` case "$exe" in */busybox) echo "It's a busybox shell." ;; esac


2

Thank you for the fast replies. I found on the machine a tftp client. Therefore I could execute: /usr/bin/tftp -l /tmp/tst -r testfile.txt -g <server ip> after opening a tftp server on .


2

POSIX AWK standard says that passing a 0 to AWK's printf with %c format can result in unspecified behaviour. However... POSIX echo also is very limited, and though octal and hexadecimal specifiers (and -n) will work on GNU echo and BASH built-in... They may not work everywhere. To maximize the chance that you get consistent behaviour on all POSIX systems, ...


2

You'll need to use a regex that will differenciate the decade in respect to century: .*(19[5-9][0-9]|[2-9][0-9]{3}).* (This will find 4-digit numbers greater than or equal 1950). Using this regex you may use the negate option of find to get files with no number >= 1950. To eliminate files without any number, use a second criteria. I've not tested this ...


1

Assuming there's no more than one occurrence per line, you can use sed -nr 's/.*Begin(.*)End.*/\1/p' With grep and non-greedy quantifier you could also print more than one per line.


1

From include/platform.h: /* FAST_FUNC is a qualifier which (possibly) makes function call faster * and/or smaller by using modified ABI. It is usually only needed * on non-static, busybox internal functions. Recent versions of gcc * optimize statics automatically. FAST_FUNC on static is required * only if you need to match a function pointer's type */ ...


1

This is the code I'm actually testing and seems to be working, based on @Charles answer: #!/bin/sh set -- *.jpg # put the sorted list of picture namefiles on argv ( the number of files on the list can be requested by echo $# ) while [ $# -gt 1 ]; do # as long as the number of files in the list is more than 1 ... shift # ...


1

From BusyBox's page I can see you have ls's option -R: -R List subdirectories recursively So you can just write: $ ls -R / Due to you don't have the -R option, you could try with a recursive shell function like this: myls() { for item in "$1"/* "$1"/.*; do [ -z "${item##*/.}" -o -z "${item##*/..}" -o -z "${item##*/\*}" ] ...


1

If you need pretty formatting, you'll have to inject newlines and tabs (which pain me in sed); an untidy but otherwise formed equivalent below: I think you only need to match the insertion point (the penultimate or last line) thus: cat infile | sed -e "s/<\/permission>/<group gid=\"media_rw\"\/><\/permission>/" gives <permission ...


1

In principle, you just need to append a tar repository containing the additional files to the end of the tar file. It is only slightly more difficult than that. A tar file consists of any number of repetitions of header + file. The header is always a single 512-byte block, and the file is padded to a multiple of 512 bytes, so you can think of these units as ...


1

If all you need is a constant filename prefix and the list contains only basenames without directories, the following shell loop should work: while read f; do ln -sf "$f" "new$f" done < list.txt


1

This comes from the build system adding a -Werror flag and therefore the compiler is treating warnings as errors and fails the build. You'll probably be able to go past this step by using the ad hoc --disable-warnings-as-errors flag.


1

Another option is the Yocto project, which uses bitbake and the OpenEmbedded metadata. It is well-documented and very flexible, but has a fairly steep learning curve.


1

Before make menuconfig You should first create the default configuration for cross compiling busybox based on the type of board used make defconfig or make vexpress_defconfig //if the board you are using is similar to vexpress Also one important argument is the architecture name, if you are building busybox for ARM then you should pass ...


1

rm only deletes directories if you apply recursion to it (-r). You can check your busybox rm's version by running it with --help. With my busybox, it does have that capability: $ busybox rm --help BusyBox v1.21.0 (2013-12-08 07:54:36 PHT) multi-call binary. Usage: rm [-irf] FILE... Remove (unlink) FILEs -i Always prompt before removing ...


1

Normally, you would use mount -oremount,rw / (/ is the mount point, not /etc/foo/bar). However, this will not work in your case, per the df output, rootfs / rootfs rw 0 0 /dev/root / squashfs ro 0 0 your rootfs is using squashfs, which is a read-only file system. See Wikipedia link. Basically, when the filesystem image is created on the build system, it ...


1

Unfortunately busybox's date has limitations but if you can consider using timestamps instead you can do: TS=$(date '+%s') date -d "@${TS}" Still if CEST is your current local time, you can do:' DATE=$(date) date -d "$(echo "$DATE" | cut -d ' ' -f 2,3,4,6)" '+%s' As removing the timezone would still apply.


1

Not sure why you have to go parsing a whole tar archive but you can just use tar to extract a specific file to stdout with -O. Example: busybox tar -xOf /somewhere/zlib-1.2.8.tar.gz zlib-1.2.8/zlib.h


1

Personally I favour: if ps ax -o pid,comm | grep `echo $$` | grep busybox ; then echo "it is BusyBox" fi Which is a fair check to ensure you are running busybox shell. This works by having ps generate a list of pids vs program names then finding our pid and checking if the program name contains busybox.



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