Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

The compiler decides this. However, in the case of C and C++, the compiler typically follows the CPU for reasons of performance. On a platform where the smallest addressable unit is 16 bits wide, a compiler could implement 8-bit char but it would have to (1) emit instructions to get the 8 bit units out of 16-bit "bytes" and (2) every char* or void* would ...


3

You can do like this: static unsafe void ToBytes(ulong value, byte[] array, int offset) { fixed (byte* ptr = &array[offset]) *(ulong*)ptr = value; } Usage: byte[] array = new byte[9]; ToBytes(0x1122334455667788, array, 1); You can set offset only in bytes. If you want managed way to do it: static void ToBytes(ulong value, byte[] ...


2

You just need to multiply the individual bytes by 256 (equivalent to shifting left 8 bits). The only tricky part is that you need to know which order to multiply them in. That is called endianness. Read more about endianness here. intVal = ((B0 * 256 + B1) * 256 + B2) * 256 + B3 In your example, the bytes are stored in little endian form (LSB first), so ...


2

If this is in hexidecimal notation, then you have some terminology confusion. 00 00 00 00 00 |__| ^ \ | byte nibble A byte is two nibbles, and a nibble is 4 bits. Decimal Hex Binary 0 0 0000 <- You went from here... 1 1 0001 2 2 0010 3 3 0011 4 ...


2

You've got three problems here: You're calling toString() on byte[], which is just going to give you something like "[B@15db9742" You're assuming you can just convert a byte array into text with no specific conversion, and not lose data You're calling getBytes() without specifying the character encoding, which is almost always a mistake. In this case, ...


1

Once you load the file into a string, it is immediately encoded as Unicode, regardless of the format of the original file. So what you are seeing is not the size of the file, but rather the size of the Unicode string representation of that file's contents. Based on your results, it looks like the file that you are loading is an ASCII file (one byte per ...


1

It is not visible from the code provided how exactly does the C# open the other end of the socket stream and how does it read. Very usual problem with reading socket streams is that you don't know when all data was received. Network layer may signal there is some data multiple times. Without some protocol including marks of the meaning data packet started ...


1

You are viewing the file in a hex editor/viewer. Each digit is a hexadecimal digit consisting of four bits in binary. The fact that you went from 00 to 60 means that you changed two bits in one of the hex digits. If you were viewing in binary mode, you wouldn't see anything other than 0s and 1s. hex 0 == binary 0000 hex 6 == binary 0110 I would ...


1

That depends on what that notation means, but I'm assuming it's showing 5 bytes in hexadecimal notation. These are bytes, 8 bit, in binary notation: 00000000 00000001 00000010 ... These are the same bytes in hexadecimal notation: 00 01 02 ... Hexadecimal notation goes from 00 to FF, binary notation for the same values from 00000000 to 11111111. If you ...


1

You say you want to avoid creating new arrays and you cannot use unsafe. Either use Ulugbek Umirov's answer with cached arrays (be careful with threading issues) or: static void ToBytes(ulong value, byte[] array, int offset) { unchecked { array[offset + 0] = (byte)(value >> (8*7)); array[offset + 1] = (byte)(value >> (8*6)); array[offset ...


1

That's because you're using read() instead of readInt() Using read() return an int which lowest 8 bits are a single byte read from the file. The readInt() method however, reads a full 32 bit (4 8-bit bytes) from the file, which is what you're writing to the file.


1

You can use xxd -r -p to convert hexadecimal to binary: echo -n 9e38cc8bf3cb7c147302f3e620528002e9dcae82 | xxd -r -p | shasum -b | awk '{print $1}' Note that the output of this is 9d371d148d9c13050057105296c32a1368821717; this matches what I get from hashing 9e38cc8bf3cb7c147302f3e620528002e9dcae82 using hash calculator. It appears that the value you got ...


1

Here you read the byte at position N, and if it's greater than your current max, you replace max with the byte at position N + 1: if (max < fileReader.read()) { max = fileReader.read(); } Can you see how this won't work? You need to save the result of fileReader.read() so you can compare it then use it: int current = fileReader.read(); if ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible