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20

You have basically two choices. You can store the data right in the row or you can use the large object facility. Since PostgreSQL now uses something called TOAST to move large fields out of the table there should be no performance penalty associated with storing large data in the row directly. There remains a 1 GB limit in the size of a field. If this is ...


9

I don't normally write complete example programs for people, but you didn't demand it and it's a pretty simple one, so here you go: #!/usr/bin/env python3 import os import sys import psycopg2 import argparse db_conn_str = "dbname=regress user=craig" create_table_stm = """ CREATE TABLE files ( id serial primary key, orig_filename text not null, ...


7

TL;DR: Delete addslashes($data). It's redundant here. Double-escaping .. twice $data=fread($p,filesize($fi)); $data=addslashes($data); $dat= pg_escape_bytea($data); You read the data in, escape it as if it were a string literal, then convert it to bytea octal or hex escapes. It could never work that way around even if pg_escape_bytea was sane, which it ...


7

When it comes to programming C functions for PostgreSQL, the documentation explains some of the basics, but for the rest it's usually down to reading the source code for the PostgreSQL server. Thankfully the code is usually well structured and easy to read. I wish it had more doc comments though. Some vital tools for navigating the source code are either: ...


7

chapter 7 of the postgresql jdbc documentation deals with storing binary data and uses an image (*.gif file) an an example. you might want to read it. inserting an image into the db (from the link above) File file = new File("myimage.gif"); FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(file); PreparedStatement ps = conn.prepareStatement("INSERT INTO images ...


4

The problem is not related to Blob support. As the error message suggests as the most common reason, "T in Table[T] does not match your * projection". It should be def * = (id, last_updated, data) <> (Test.tupled, Test.unapply _). Note that this will still not work for bytea. Slick's PostgreSQL driver maps Blob to the blob type from PotgreSQL's "lo" ...


4

A column of type Oid is just a reference to the binary contents which are actually stored in the system's pg_largeobject table. In terms of storage, an Oid a 4 byte integer. On the other hand, a column of type bytea is the actual contents. To transfer a bytea into a large object, a new large object should be created with the file-like API of large objects: ...


3

I think the best answer can be found at Grace Batumbya's Blog, in verbis: The algorithm is pretty simple, get the binary data, if it is null, return null. Else create a large object and in the lowrite function, pass it the binary value, instead of a path to a file. The code for the procedure is below. Note that the lo_manage package should be ...


3

I hope this will work for you. import Image import StringIO im = Image.open("file_name.jpg") # Getting the Image fp = StringIO.StringIO() im.save(fp,"JPEG") output = fp.getvalue() # The output is 8-bit String. StringIO Image


3

Pg offers two ways to store binary files: large objects, in the pg_largeobject table, which are referred to by an oid. Often used via the lo extension. May be loaded with lo_import. bytea columns in regular tables. Represented as octal escapes like \000\001\002fred\004 in PostgreSQL 9.0 and below, or as hex escapes by default in Pg 9.1 and above eg \x0102. ...


3

A rationale was given in the release notes of Postgres 9.0: Allow bytea values to be written in hex notation (Peter Eisentraut) The server parameter bytea_output controls whether hex or traditional format is used for bytea output. Libpq's PQescapeByteaConn() function automatically uses the hex format when connected to PostgreSQL 9.0 or ...


3

It is better to use postgres large objects if you really have to store images in your database. In the userinfo table instead of the image itself store just a link to it as loid (large object id). Insert an image into the database: pg_query("begin"); // pg_lo functions need to be run in a transaction $loid = ...


3

This is really a Java issue rather than a PostgreSQL issue. personTable.mycolumn is holding a byte-string that was created using the Java Serialization API, and to retrieve the original object that the byte-string represents, you need to use that same API. (See "Discover the secrets of the Java Serialization API" for sample code.)


2

Here is some sample code showing how to do it with server-side Perl. Annoyingly, pack/unpack are considered untrusted operations by PG so this has to be created with plperlu by a superuser and then access granted with GRANT EXECUTE to non superusers. On the other hand, this choice of language makes it easy to deal with more complex packed structures, which ...


2

Okay, the query made with "PQexec" command returns the value in text format and it has no parameter to tell you want the result in text format or byte. I am not sure if a better and more suitable command exist to query it but I used "PQexecParams" and set the return type 1 (1 for byte, 0 for text) and it returned the exact data with the expected size. ...


2

The BLOB (LO) type stores data in 2KB chunks within standard PostgreSQL heap pages which default to 8KB in size. They are not stored as independent, cohesive files in the file system - for example, you wouldn't be able to locate the file, do a byte-by-byte comparison and expect it to be the same as the original file data that you loaded into the database, ...


2

Since you asked Postgres to decode your hex string and stores it as binary, you should ask postgres to encode it back to hex on output. SELECT encode(some_hash, 'hex'), * FROM some_table WHERE some_hash in decode(another_hash, 'hex') Alternatively, you can do the encoding in python. Try binascii.hexlify(data).


2

Update: See edit to question, this answer applies to the commonplace 16-byte serializations of uuid; the question was amended to reflect java serialization. Interesting problem. I landed up writing a simple C extension to do it efficiently, but it's probably more sensible to use the PL/Python version below. Because uuid is a fixed sized type and bytea is ...


1

There's no way to definitively know the MIME type other than assigning it to another field when you store the bytea in the first place. Presuming you have byte arrays of unknown type that represent files or other reasonably complete objects that could have a MIME type, you can use MIME-type guessing tools much like you can on files. These tools are far from ...


1

Read the file in the client. Escape the contents as bytea. Insert into database as normal.


1

Postgres 9.4 adds a built-in function for this: lo_from_bytea(loid oid, string bytea) From the release notes: Add SQL functions to allow [large object reads/writes][12] at arbitrary offsets (Pavel Stehule) For older versions, this is more efficient than what has been posted before: CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION blob_write(bytea) RETURNS oid AS ...


1

When you ran the following query: insert into testhex (testhex) values ('\x123456'); You inserted the 3 byte sequence [0x12 0x34 0x56] into the table. For the database query you're executing with QueryRow though, you're searching for the 8 character literal string \x123456 so you get no matches in the result. When you use positional arguments with ...


1

The bytea_output setting has nothing to do with how bytea is interpreted by the server, only how it's sent to the client. Do you want to insert the literal string \x320000000d2f2100 (as 7-bit ascii), i.e. producing the bytes 0x5c 0x78 0x33 0x32 0x30 0x30 0x30 0x30 0x30 0x30 0x30 0x64 0x32 0x66 0x32 0x31 0x30 0x30? If so, escape the backslash, as documented ...


1

Returning binary from plperl When declared as returning bytea, a pl/perl function must actually return a postgresql text representation for bytea. Consider this excerpt from PL/Perl Functions and Arguments in the doc (and more specifically the last sentence): Anything in a function argument that is not a reference is a string, which is in the ...


1

The value is stored correctly, but is escaped into octal escape sequences upon retrieval. To fix that - change the settings of the DB driver or chose different different encoding/escaping for bytea. Or just use proper field types for the XML data - like varchar or XML.


1

change bytea_output='escape' in postgresql.conf or run this ALTER DATABASE dbname SET bytea_output TO 'escape';


1

For MySql you can do CREATE TABLE blobT ( bytea blob; ); String query = "INSERT INTO blobT (bytea) VALUES (?)"; PreparedStatement pstmt = conn.prepareStatement(query); pstmt.setBytes(1, bytea); pstmt.execute();


1

Not to be rude, but they're exactly the same. One is octal, the other hexadecimal. >>> '\235\257\362\203M\335s\301\215y\343\035\342/\015I\337\023\345%\323\377\256Y\2250\276\314\321\271\026\377' '\x9d\xaf\xf2\x83M\xdds\xc1\x8dy\xe3\x1d\xe2/\rI\xdf\x13\xe5%\xd3\xff\xaeY\x950\xbe\xcc\xd1\xb9\x16\xff'


1

Something must be messing with the values during the replication process. In PostgreSQL 9.1, I can repeatedly cast back and forth between bytea and text. select 'test'::bytea; returns \x74657374 The following also return the same value: select 'test'::bytea::text; select 'test'::bytea::text::bytea; this makes me wonder if Ruby-rep is double escaping ...


1

The data is escaped ( starts with \x and then is hexadecimal two chars for each byte) this is what comes out of a bytea field. you need to unescape it before storing it in the file.



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