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From Fastest way to find a string in a text file with java: The best realization I've found in MIMEParser: https://github.com/samskivert/ikvm-openjdk/blob/master/build/linux-amd64/impsrc/com/sun/xml/internal/org/jvnet/mimepull/MIMEParser.java /** * Finds the boundary in the given buffer using Boyer-Moore algo. * Copied from java.util.regex.Pattern.java ...


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It's not adding the whole byte array, it's just adding the byte at position 43. (i.e. the 44th byte in the array).


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When using ByteBuffer there is a difference between putting and getting values from the buffer. When bytes are put on the buffer they get added at the current position. If the limit is reached then the buffer is full. So position() shows the amount of data in the buffer and remaining() shows how many bytes can still be put on the buffer. I'm assuming here ...


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Why don't you use ByteBuffer.array()? It returns array of bytes that backs this buffer. See http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/nio/ByteBuffer.html#array()


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Simple sample works. ByteBuffer bb1 = ByteBuffer.wrap("hello world".getBytes()); System.out.println(bb1.hasArray()); System.out.println(new String(bb1.array())); However you say has array returns false. May be its read only. /** * Tells whether or not this buffer is backed by an accessible byte * array. * * <p> If this method ...


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ByteBuffer exposes the bulk get(byte[]) method which transfers bytes from the buffer into the array. You'll need to instantiate an array of length equal to the number of remaining bytes in the buffer. ByteBuffer buf = ... byte[] arr = new byte[buf.remaining()]; buf.get(arr);


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If hasArray() reports false then, calling array() will throw an exception. In that case, the only way to get the data in a byte[] is to allocate a byte[] and copy the bytes to the byte[] using get(byte) or similar.


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It is far from a silly question but unfortunately it all depends on the case. Generally even using the vertex buffers on the GPU might not be the best idea if the vertex data is constantly changing but I guess this is not the case you are having. So the two main differences in what you are thinking would be: Modify each of the vertex in the CPU and then ...


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Java's only unsigned type is char, and it happens to be 16-bit wide. However, this is not the right choice to represent length: you should use int internally, and convert to/from 16-bit short only during serialization and deserialization. int dataSize = data.length; ... bytes.putShort((short)(dataSize & 0xFFFF)); and short tmp = getShort(...); int ...


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As far as I know GWT only supports ByteBuffer as this is part of Java itself. ByteBuf is a class which is part of Netty.


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They were made for different purposes. ByteBuffer - it's just a byte buffer with a lot of convenience methods for manipulate data. BufferedStream - it's the buffered implementation of InputStream. It's made to buffer data from one InputStream to another.


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Thanks everybody I already did it. Here you ha `String binary=toBin(head[11])+toBin(head[10])+toBin(head[9])+toBin(head[8]); long unixSeconds=stringToInt(binary); Date date = new Date(unixSeconds*1000L); SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss z"); sdf.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getDefault()); String ...


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byte[] array= {192, 242, 217, 84}; int timestamp = ByteBuffer.wrap(array).getInt();


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Basically, it reads in four bytes, each of which is eight bits and it combines them together into an integer which is 32 bits. It does this by shifting each successive byte an extra 8 places to the left, so the first byte read is placed into the last (lowest order) 8 bits of the integer (0-7); the next byte goes into the next 8 bits (15-8), etc. It would be ...


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This reads four bytes from the underlying byte buffer and stitches them together into an int value like this: 11111111 (first byte read) 22222222 (second byte read) 33333333 (third byte read) 44444444 (fourth byte read) To achieve that, a bitwise OR operation ...


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Well, as to part (1), no, the buffer does not have to be backed by a Java array - and isn't when constructed like this. As to (2), the actual implementation will be dependent on the underlying operating system, as the implementation uses native OS calls to actually implement the array. On Linux you would expect it's using a malloc() kernel call to reserve ...


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As mentioned in the comments, a Reader (and its subclass BufferedReader) is used to read characters not bytes. You should instead use a BufferedInputStream to read into a byte array of the specified size: public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException { String website = "thecakestory.com"; Socket client = new ...


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Create a byte array (of the size you want) outside your while-loop (you can re-use it that way, so it's faster). You can use a BufferedInputStream wrapped around your original InputStream instead of a Reader (as Readers can convert bytes to Strings, but we don't need that). Then you can use the read(byte[]) method of BufferedInputStream to copy the next ...


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Looks like your job setup for the reducer has bytebuffer as the output, rather than the map<>. Try changing this in your job setup job.setOutputKeyClass(ByteBuffer.class); to this job.setOutputKeyClass(Map<String,ByteBuffer>.class); anyway, the generic types in the job.set.... need to align across the generic type args for the mapper and ...


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finally I pick up the ssid list by this function, looks stupid, but it works, I want to find the better way: public static List<String> getSsidList(byte[] byteRecv) { System.out.println("get from device"); List<String> ssidListOpt = new ArrayList<String>(); try { if (byteRecv[0] != 0) ...


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ByteBuffer is writing out unsigned varint. I need to use writeVaruint32. https://github.com/dcodeIO/ByteBuffer.js/issues/44


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You don't say where ApPower is encoded, but otherwise this class will do what you want. public class ApList_str { private final String ssid; private int ApPower = -1; /* Unknown */ public ApList_str(String ssid) { this.ssid = ssid; } public String getSsid() { return ssid; } public int getApPower() { ...


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50 1c is start flag 04 80 is the command 00 00 is a status ce 01 is the ssid list length If the above list is constant, as similar to application protocol buffers, then you can parse the bytearray and print the values. check for parsing of radius packet.


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From reading the Javadocs, I think remaining only gives you number of bytes between current position and limit. remaining() Returns the number of elements between the current position and the limit. Furthermore: A buffer's capacity is the number of elements it contains. The capacity of a buffer is never negative and never changes. A ...


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Allocate a byte[] if necessary, and then use the ByteBuffer.get(byte[]) or ByteBuffer.get(byte[], int, int) method to copy bytes into the array. Depending on the state of the ByteBuffer you may need to flip it first. In some cases it may also be possible to get the backing array for the ByteBuffer, but this is not recommended ... For more details, the ...



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