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8

Yes, with -XX:+UnlockDiagnosticVMOptions -XX:+PrintAssembly the Hotspot VM can give you that information when it actually executes (compiles) a given bytecode method. See for example HotSpotInternals Wiki:Print Assembly for details. It does require a disassembler module (hsdis-*.dll on Windows). A bit more comfortable is using JITWatch (but it uses the ...


8

The answer really depends on how hard you want to try to convert the code. Since Java and Scala are both turing complete, any program in one can trivially be converted to the other, but this isn't really interesting or useful. What you really want is to convert the results to readable, idiomatic code. From this perspective, even Java code can't ...


7

A large number of bytecodes take arguments (any bytecode with a codepoint at or over dis.HAVE_ARGUMENT. Those that do have a 2-byte argument, in little-endian order. You can see the definition for what bytecodes Python currently uses and what they mean in the dis module documenation. With 2 bytes you can give any bytecode an argument value between 0 and ...


6

Scala's nested blocks do not have a Java equivalent. Nested block in Scala (taken from this question): def apply(x: Boolean) = new Tuple2(null, { while (x) { } null }) Produces the bytecode 0: new #12 // class scala/Tuple2 3: dup 4: aconst_null 5: iload_1 6: ifne 5 9: aconst_null 10: ...


5

The simple answer is: You can't. There is a related answer of Brian Goetz on this matter. For implementing lambda expressions, javac creates an INVOKEDYNAMIC instruction which delegates the invocation to the LambdaMetaFactory's bootstrap method. For the OpenJDK, this bootstrap method is then creating an implementation of the required interface at runtime ...


5

First off, your first method isn't actually inspecting anything, it just displays a constant false. So the real question is why the second two methods give different results. To see what's really going on, we can start by compiling the test class public class TestModifiers { // this is the class to be tested private class InnerClass {} } Disassembling ...


4

Python bytecodes take 2-byte arguments. The extra zeros are the high bytes of the arguments.


4

Theory The Java VM Specification ยง4.10.1 (Verification by Type Checking) specifies that when a stack map frame is required. At first it gives an informal description: The intent is that a stack map frame must appear at the beginning of each basic block in a method. The stack map frame specifies the verification type of each operand stack entry and of ...


3

If you just want to SEE the bytecode: javap -c -p -v classfile ^disassemble ^private methods ^verbose, including constant pool and bootstrap methods attribute But if you want to try to do this at runtime, you're pretty much out of luck (by design, we don't have anything like Expression Trees), as the other answer suggests.


3

As pointed out in the comments, it is difficult to tell without actually looking at the assembly. As yoy are using a REST-framework, I assume however that is would be hard to tell from the assembly as there is quite a lot of code to read. Instead, I want to give you an educated guess because your code is an archetypical example of applying costant folding. ...


1

In general, jvm uses three different memory segments Heap - contains all created objects in runtime, objects only plus their object attributes (instance variables) Stack - contains local variables and Reference variables(variables that hold the address of an object in the heap) Code segment - the segment where the actual compiled Java bytecodes resides ...


1

youre a victim of runtime optimization :-) if you change your code a little: Question q = new Question(); for (int i=0; i<2; i++) { q.executeGlobal(); q.executeStatic(); q.executeLocal(); } you get this: Type Global: 38331943 ns Type Static: 57761889 ns Type Local: 3010189 ns Type Global: 46249688 ns Type Static: 52745009 ns Type Local: 0 ...


1

Another reason could be the cache missing. Cache misses bring a ~250% penalty , when CPU needs to refresh it's cache (that means the variable you are trying to access isn't in the CPU cache is in RAM). Looking at the results of your test, it seems to be a cache miss problem : Your local variables (mLocal and i ) are accessed in every cycle, but they are ...


1

You are trying to re-invent cglib's FastMethod In fact, Reflection is not slower at all. See http://stackoverflow.com/a/23580143/3448419 Reflection can do more than 50,000,000 invocations per second. It is unlikely to be a bottleneck.


1

If you are searching for the official documentation about byte code and class file format, you can go to the Java Virtual Machine Specification


1

It seems this behavior is caused by specifying the sourceCompatibility before apply plugin: 'java', which happens if you try to set the compatibility option inside allprojects. In my setup, the situation can be solved by replacing: allprojects { sourceCompatibility = 1.6 targetCompatibility = 1.6 } with: allprojects { apply plugin: 'java' ...


1

Arbitrarily large. Even if you consider only a single VM implementation running on a single processor, there is huge variation due to the use of Just In Time Compilation. The VM doesn't necessary execute the bytecode operations one by one. Instead, it analyzes it, optimizes them, and compiles it to native code. So there is not necessarily any correspondence ...


1

You're failing verification because the address you're trying to branch to is not an instruction. Very little has changed in the Dalvik runtime since mid-2011, so it's unlikely that this is a change in the verification behavior. There have been a few changes to "dx", so it's possible that the method's bytecode is being generated differently, and your ...


1

I happen to work with a lot of byte code and I once wrote a summary of byte code features that are not reproduceable by writing Java code. However, all these non-existing features are rather conventions of composing byte code instructions. By Java 8, any existing opcode was used by a Java class file format. This is not too surprising as the Java language ...


1

As you noted, Scala eventually compiles to JVM bytecode. An obvious instruction from the JVM instruction set, that has no equivalent in the Java language, is goto. A Scala compiler might use goto for instance to optimize loops or tail-recursive methods. In this case, in Java you would have to emulate the behavior of a goto. As Antimony hinted, a Turing ...


1

It really depends on how you define So what Scala statements or code can produce bytecode which can not be translated to java?. Ultimately, some of the scala features are backed by the so named ScalaSignature (scala signature) that stores meta information. As of 2.10, it may be deemed as a secret api which is abstracted by the scala reflection mechanisms ...



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