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73

You can also use the tar flag "--use-compress-program=" to tell tar what compression program to use. For example use: tar -c --use-compress-program=pigz -f tar.file dir_to_zip


58

You can use pigz instead of gzip, which does gzip compression on multiple cores. Instead of using the -z option, you would pipe it through pigz: tar cvf - paths-to-archive | pigz > archive.tar.gz By default, pigz uses eight cores. You can ask for more with -p n, e.g. -p 32. pigz has the same options as gzip, so you can request better compression ...


25

Probably as you built python from source, you don't have bz2 headers. Install them on Ubuntu/Debian: sudo apt-get install libbz2-dev Fedora: sudo yum install libbz2-devel // or bzip2-devel And build python again. You may notice that python checks for lots of libraries when configuring/building, if you miss some of them you probably will get no ...


25

The best option I can see is Apache Commons Compress with this Maven dependency. <dependency> <groupId>org.apache.commons</groupId> <artifactId>commons-compress</artifactId> <version>1.0</version> </dependency> From the examples: FileInputStream in = new FileInputStream("archive.tar.bz2"); ...


13

I am no expert, but this worked for me. Option 1 (straight from source) Download source files for zlib and for bzip2. Extract the downloads to directories, move directories to somewhere you like. I had to avoid C:\Program Files (x86)\ as I couldn't get it to work with spaces in the directory name, so I created C:\Sys\ and used that. Open a command prompt ...


12

Like this: readcsvbz2file <- read.csv(bzfile("file.csv.bz2"))


11

Okay, I worked up a quick example for you. No error checking and various arbitrary decisions, but it works. libbzip2 has fairly good web documentation. libtar, not so much, but there are manpages in the package, an example, and a documented header file. The below can be built with g++ C++TarBz2.cpp -ltar -lbz2 -o C++TarBz2.exe: #include ...


11

If all the files are in a single directory then: bzip2 * Is enough. A more robust approach is: find . -type f -exec bzip2 {} + Which will compress every file in the current directory and its sub-directories, and will work even if you have tens of thousands of files (using * will break if there are too many files in the directory). If your computer has ...


9

You can simply concatenate many bz2 files into single bz2 file, like that: $ cat file1.bz2 file2.bz2 file3.bz2 >resulting_file.bz2 bzip2 and other utilities like lbzip2 will be able to decompress the resulting file as expected.


7

Check out SharpZipLib. From the FAQ: What formats does SharpZipLib support? Sharpzip supports Zip files using both stored and deflate compression methods and also supports old (PKZIP 2.0) style and AES encryption, tar with GNU long filename extensions, gzip, zlib and raw deflate, as well as BZip2. Zip64 is supported while Deflate64 is not yet ...


7

You have to add BZip2 header (two bytes: 'B','Z') before writing the content: //Write 'BZ' before compressing the stream fos.write("BZ".getBytes()); //Write to compressed stream as usual CBZip2OutputStream os = new CBZip2OutputStream(fos); ... the rest ... Then, for instance, you can extract contents of your bzipped file with cat compressed.bz2 | bunzip2 ...


7

Common approach There is option for tar program: -I, --use-compress-program PROG filter through PROG (must accept -d) You can use multithread version of archiver or compressor utility. Most popular multithread archivers are pigz (instead of gzip) and pbzip2 (instead of bzip2). For instance: $ tar -I pbzip2 -cf OUTPUT_FILE.tar.bz2 paths_to_archive ...


7

You need to read them compressed files like this: awk '{ ... }' <(gzip -dc input1.vcf.gz) <(gzip -dc input2.vcf.gz) Try this: awk 'FNR==NR { sub(/AA=\.;/,""); array[$1,$2]=$8; next } ($1,$2) in array { print $0 ";" array[$1,$2] }' <(gzip -dc input1.vcf.gz) <(gzip -dc input2.vcf.gz) | gzip > output.vcf.gz


6

You could use resource module to limit resources available to your process and its children. If you need to decompress in memory then you could set resource.RLIMIT_AS (or RLIMIT_DATA, RLIMIT_STACK) e.g., using a context manager to automatically restore it to a previous value: import contextlib import resource @contextlib.contextmanager def limit(limit, ...


6

Do you have to use bzip2? Reading it's documentation, it's quite clear it's not designed to support random access. Perhaps you should use a compression format that more closely matches your requirements. The good old Zip format supports random access, but might compress worse, of course.


6

There is a http://bitbucket.org/james_taylor/seek-bzip2 Grab the source, compile it. Run with ./seek-bzip2 32 < bzip_compressed.bz2 to test. the only param is bit displacement of wondered block header. You can get it with finding a "31 41 59 26 53 59 " hex string in the binary file. 32 is bit size of "BZh1" header where 1 can be any digit from 1 ...


6

The Wikimedia Foundation just released an InputReader for the Hadoop Streaming interface that is able to read the bz2 compressed full dump files and send it to your mappers. The unit being send to a mapper is not a whole page but two revisions (so you can actually run a diff on the two revisions). This is the initial release and I am sure there will be some ...


6

CBizp2InputStream indeed uses AES ECB. This is a working implementation. I omitted error handling to make the code shorter: c, _ := aes.NewCipher([]byte(keyString)) bufIn := make([]byte, 16) bufOut := make([]byte, 16) dec := bytes.NewBuffer(make([]byte, 0)) var i int for { i, _ = src.Read(bufIn) if i == 0 { break } ...


6

Let's begin by answering your specific questions. Code example below. Q&A Are there any general problems with the process of loading a different file and "converting" it to GIF? The main problem is complication. You are effectively writing a browser addon, like those for JPEG2000. If you are writing real browser addons, each major ...


5

bzip2 -dc input1.vcf.bz2 input2.vcf.bz2 | awk 'FNR==NR { array[$1,$2]=$8; next } ($1,$2) in array { print $0 ";" array[$1,$2] }' or gzip -dc input1.vcf.gz input2.vcf.gz | awk 'FNR==NR { array[$1,$2]=$8; next } ($1,$2) in array { print $0 ";" array[$1,$2] }' EDIT: To write compressed output just append | bzip2 >output.vcf.bz2 or | gzip ...


5

how come crc32("\x00") is not 0x00000000? The basic CRC algorithm is to treat the input message as a polynomial in GF(2), divide by the fixed CRC polynomial, and use the polynomial remainder as the resulting hash. CRC-32 makes a number of modifications on the basic algorithm: The bits in each byte of the message is reversed. For example, the byte ...


4

You forgot your question. But I'll answer it regardless. Use exec() to invoke your bash script.


4

Since the license of bzip2 is compatible (read it, please) you can statically link against bzip2 instead of dynamically. A bit of searching lead to iOS-libarchive that will help you do that.


4

This is my source code: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> #include <bzlib.h> int bunzip_one(FILE *f) { int bzError; BZFILE *bzf; char buf[4096]; bzf = BZ2_bzReadOpen(&bzError, f, 0, 0, NULL, 0); if (bzError != BZ_OK) { fprintf(stderr, "E: BZ2_bzReadOpen: %d\n", bzError); return -1; ...


4

Here's my code using DEFLATE compression in the boost.iostreams library; I'm sure you can hook in the corresponding BZip2 compressor instead: #include <boost/iostreams/filtering_streambuf.hpp> #include <boost/iostreams/filter/zlib.hpp> #include <boost/iostreams/filter/bzip2.hpp> // <--- this one for you #include ...


4

If you're willing to burn a few days of CPU, here's one solution with the magical pipe facility of modern UNIX(R) operating systems: bzip2 -dc file*.bz2 | bzip2 >resulting_file.bz2 ... actually, grab lbzip2 version 2.0, and do the same, except with lbzip2, on a multicore: lbzip2 -dc file*.bz2 | lbzip2 >resulting_file.bz2


4

bzip2 has a library interface -- that will probably be easier for you than invoking a subprocess. I recommend you also have a look at the GIO library, which is already a "virtual file system for application developers"; it might be a lot less work to extend that to do what you want, than to write a library VFS from scratch.


4

When you use a BZ2Compressor, you get data in chunks when you call compress(), and a good chance is that you only get the data when you call flush(). It should work if you change your function like this: def compressFile(file_name, new_name): comp = bz2.BZ2Compressor() comFile = open(new_name, "wb") oldFile = open(file_name, "rb") ...


4

BZ2File does return a file-like object (although not an actual file). The problem is that you're calling read() on it: dfile = bz2.BZ2File('myfile.bz2').read() This reads the entire file into memory as one big string, which you then pass to fromfile. Depending on your versions of numpy and python and your platform, reading from a file-like object that ...


4

BZIP2 is splittable in hadoop - it provides very good compression ratio but from CPU time and performances is not providing optimal results, as compression is very CPU consuming. LZO is splittable in hadoop - leveraging hadoop-lzo you have splittable compressed LZO files. You need to have external .lzo.index files to be able to process in parallel. The ...



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