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1983

foreach (Suit suit in (Suit[]) Enum.GetValues(typeof(Suit))) { }


1910

string is an alias for System.String. So technically, there is no difference. It's like int vs. System.Int32. As far as guidelines, I think it's generally recommended to use string any time you're referring to an object. e.g. string place = "world"; Likewise, I think it's generally recommended to use String if you need to refer specifically to the ...


1643

Just for the sake of completeness, here's a brain dump of related information... As others have noted, string is an alias for System.String. They compile to the same code, so at execution time there is no difference whatsoever. This is just one of the aliases in C#. The complete list is: object: System.Object string: System.String bool: ...


1416

From a string: YourEnum foo = (YourEnum) Enum.Parse(typeof(YourEnum), yourString); From an int: YourEnum foo = (YourEnum)yourInt; Update : From number you can also: YourEnum foo = (YourEnum)Enum.ToObject(typeof(YourEnum) , yourInt);


1341

The point of Dispose is to free unmanaged resources. It needs to be done at some point, otherwise they will never be cleaned up. The garbage collector doesn't know how to call DeleteHandle() on a variable of type IntPtr, it doesn't know whether or not it needs to call DeleteHandle(). Note: What is an unmanaged resource? If you found it in the Microsoft ...


1323

You could use IndexOf() and pass StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase string title = "STRING"; bool contains = title.IndexOf("string", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) >= 0; Even better is defining a new extension method for string public static bool Contains(this string source, string toCheck, StringComparison comp) { return ...


1148

\d checks all Unicode digits, while [0-9] is limited to these 10 characters. For example, Persian digits, ۱۲۳۴۵۶۷۸۹, are an example of Unicode digits which are matched with \d, but not [0-9]. You can generate a list of all such characters using the following code: var sb = new StringBuilder(); for(UInt16 i = 0; i < UInt16.MaxValue; i++) { string str ...


1035

foreach(KeyValuePair<string, string> entry in MyDic) { // do something with entry.Value or entry.Key }


1027

These are the versions of C# known about at the time of this writing: C# 1.0 released with .NET 1.0 and VS2002 (January 2002) C# 1.2 (bizarrely enough); released with .NET 1.1 and VS2003 (April 2003). First version to call Dispose on IEnumerators which implemented IDisposable. A few other small features. C# 2.0 released with .NET 2.0 and VS2005 (November ...


1023

There is actually a (subtle) difference between the two. Imagine you have the following code in File1.cs: // File1.cs using System; namespace Outer.Inner { class Foo { static void Bar() { double d = Math.PI; } } } Now imagine that someone adds another file (File2.cs) to the project that looks like this: // ...


906

The compiler declares the variable in a way that makes it highly prone to an error that is often difficult to find and debug, while producing no perceivable benefits. Your criticism is entirely justified. I discuss this problem in detail here: Closing over the loop variable considered harmful Is there something you can do with foreach loops this ...


872

Contrary to the answers here, you DON'T need to worry about encoding! Like you mentioned, your goal is, simply, to "get what bytes the string has been stored in". (And, of course, to be able to re-construct the string from the bytes.) For those goals, I honestly do not understand why people keep telling you that you need the encodings. You certainly do NOT ...


868

It's the null coalescing operator, and quite like the ternary (immediate-if) operator. See also ?? Operator - MSDN. FormsAuth = formsAuth ?? new FormsAuthenticationWrapper(); expands to: FormsAuth = formsAuth != null ? formsAuth : new FormsAuthenticationWrapper(); which further expands to: if(formsAuth != null) FormsAuth = formsAuth; else ...


802

An abstract function can have no functionality. You're basically saying, any child class MUST give their own version of this method, however it's too general to even try to implement in the parent class. A virtual function, is basically saying look, here's the functionality that may or may not be good enough for the child class. So if it is good enough, ...


802

For some reason Jeff's code didn't seem simple enough. To me this seems simpler and easier to understand: DateTime today = DateTime.Today; int age = today.Year - bday.Year; if (bday > today.AddYears(-age)) age--;


795

FWIW, a Dictionary is a hash table. If you meant "why do we use the Dictionary class instead of the Hashtable class?", then it's an easy answer: Dictionary is a generic type, Hashtable is not. That means you get type safety with Dictionary, because you can't insert any random object into it, and you don't have to cast the values you take out.


753

This isn't C# per se, but I haven't seen anyone who really uses System.IO.Path.Combine() to the extent that they should. In fact, the whole Path class is really useful, but no one uses it! I'm willing to bet that every production app has the following code, even though it shouldn't: string path = dir + "\\" + fileName;


746

The flags attribute should be used whenever the enumerable represents a collection of flags, rather than a single value. Such collections are usually manipulated using bitwise operators, for example: myProperties.AllowedColors = MyColor.Red | MyColor.Green | MyColor.Blue; Note that [Flags] by itself doesn't change this at all - all it does is enable a ...


734

You don't use a file input control. Server side controls are not used in ASP.NET MVC. Checkout the following blog post which illustrates how to achieve this in ASP.NET MVC. So you would start by creating an HTML form which would contain a file input: @using (Html.BeginForm("Index", "Home", FormMethod.Post, new { enctype = "multipart/form-data" })) { ...


733

Catch System.Exception and switch on the types catch (Exception ex) { if (ex is FormatException || ex is OverflowException) { WebId = Guid.Empty; return; } throw; }


730

Whilst the standard practice is to implement the ICloneable interface (described here, so I won't regurgitate), here's a nice deep clone object copier I found on The Code Project a while ago and incorporated it in our stuff. As mentioned elsewhere, it does require your objects to be serializable. using System; using System.IO; using ...


711

Just cast the enum eg. int something = (int)Question.Role;


697

Yes you can use the GetValues method var values = Enum.GetValues(typeof(Foos)); Or the typed version var values = Enum.GetValues(typeof(Foos)).Cast<Foos>(); I long ago added a helper function to my private library for just such an occasion public static class EnumUtil { public static IEnumerable<T> GetValues<T>() { return ...


691

Yes, both will give you deferred execution. The difference is that IQueryable<T> is the interface that allows LINQ-to-SQL (LINQ.-to-anything really) to work. So if you further refine your query on an IQueryable<T>, that query will be executed in the database, if possible. For the IEnumerable<T> case, it will be LINQ-to-object, meaning ...


679

It depends on the encoding of your string (ASCII, UTF8, ...). e.g.: byte[] b1 = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes (myString); byte[] b2 = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes (myString); Update: A small sample why encoding matters: string pi = "\u03a0"; byte[] ascii = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes (pi); byte[] utf8 = ...


672

There's a simple trick for this problem: bool IsPowerOfTwo(ulong x) { return (x & (x - 1)) == 0; } For completeness, zero is not a power of two. If you want to take into account that edge case, here's how: bool IsPowerOfTwo(ulong x) { return (x != 0) && ((x & (x - 1)) == 0); } Explanation First and foremost the bitwise binary ...


662

You can't query against the DataTable's Rows collection, since DataRowCollection doesn't implement IEnumerable<T>. You need to use the AsEnumerable() extension for DataTable. Like so: var results = from myRow in myDataTable.AsEnumerable() where myRow.Field<int>("RowNo") == 1 select myRow; And as Keith says, you'll need to add a reference to ...


643

MethodImplOptions.InternalCall That means that the method is actually implemented in the CLR, written in C++. The just-in-time compiler consults a table with internally implemented methods and compiles the call to the C++ function directly. Having a look at the code requires the source code for the CLR. You can get that from the SSCLI20 distribution. ...


640

Modify your constructor to the following so that it calls the base class constructor properly: public class MyExceptionClass : Exception { public MyExceptionClass(string message, string extrainfo) : base(message) { //other stuff here } } Note that a constructor is not something that you can call anytime within a method. That's the ...


622

For you to output foo {1, 2, 3} you have to do something like: string t = "1, 2, 3"; string v = String.Format(" foo {{{0}}}", t); To output a { you use {{ and to output a } you use }}.



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