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11

Thread.Sleep(0) will yield to other threads that don't have lower priority then yours: If the value of the millisecondsTimeout argument is zero, the thread relinquishes the remainder of its time slice to any thread of equal priority that is ready to run. If there are no other threads of equal priority that are ready to run, execution of the current ...


9

It looks like you're trying to write constructors, in which case your method headers should be public IField(string columnName, string[] keys) and public IField(string columnName, string[] keys, string[] cleansing)


8

As the message says: you can't do that. You could take a copy of the parameter value, and capture that, for example: public Action CallDoSomeMagic(string foo, ref string bar) { var snapshot = bar; return new Action(() => DoSomeMagic(foo, ref snapshot)); } But note that updates to snapshot are not visible outside the caller via bar. The ...


8

What you've done above is basically create a class with two read-only properties, they just happen to use Tuple as a backing store. The problem you highlight is not one the Tuple aims to fix. Tuple is there to provide a generic construct for wrapping values in to an object where defining a class is deemed too much effort. I don't personally rate them and ...


8

If you need to update, use FindIndex: int index = myList.FindIndex(n => n == "John"); myList[index] = "Anna";


7

Unfortunately, this only works if the database has a primary key. Because of the specific structure and use of the database, there can't be a primary key. Two things: first of all, databases don't have primary keys, tables do. I assume you mean that you have a table in your database that doesn't have a primary key defined for it. Which leads to number ...


7

Add a ToList() to the end of the call to avoid duplicate invocations of the selector. This is a stateful LINQ query with side-effects, which is by nature unpredictable. Somewhere else in the code, you called something that caused the first element to be evaluated, like First() or Any(). In general, it is dangerous to have side-effects in LINQ queries, and ...


7

This is due to implicit conversion from char to int. You are getting the ASCII values of your chars. Try this instead: var arr = textBox1.Text.Select(x => int.Parse(x.ToString())).ToArray();


7

Abusing lambda syntax and type inference: (validName ? (Action) (() => { name = "Daniel"; surname = "Smith"; }) : () => { MessageBox.Show("Invalid name"); })(); I know, not really an answer. If statement is way better: obviously this ...


7

I think you just want to get the Values like this: List<string> flatList = alreadyThere.Values.ToList(); Since string is an IEnumerable<char>, SelectMany returns IEnumerable<char>. It thinks that you are trying to get each character separately into a list. But I don't think you want that.. Flattening can be useful only if you have a ...


7

You can argue what is the "best" way. Bit the way how i would do it. At first i would create a helper method that helps you to generate Enumerables. public static IEnumerable<T> Unfold<T>(T seed, Func<T, T> accumulator) { var nextValue = seed; while ( true ) { yield return nextValue; nextValue = ...


6

Use generic constraints: public void SomeMethod<T>(ref T para1) where T : ITest { // ... }


5

It isn't always easy to tell, particularly if you use an invalid declaration of course. A char[] can't be marshaled as LPWStr, it has to be LPArray. Now the CharSet attribute plays a role, since you did not specify it, the char[] will be marshaled as an 8-bit char[], not a 16-bit wchar_t[]. The marshaled array element is not the same size (it is not ...


5

C# 6 is going to introduce a new syntax for "primary constructors" which will substantially simplify classes such as your class Temperature. For example: public sealed class Temperature(decimal value, Unit unit) { public decimal Value { get; } = value; public Unit Unit { get; } = unit; } In the future, you should be able to use that approach ...


5

As the other answer noted, the reason your controller is not finishing is because the task is not started. However, using Task.Start, Task.Factory.StartNew, or Task.Run is not a good solution on ASP.NET. The entire point of using async/await on ASP.NET is to free up a thread. However, if you await a task that is started via Start/StartNew/Run, then you're ...


5

You need to specify your own Brush object with an alpha channel (opacity) component that is not 1. <Grid> <Grid.Background> <SolidColorBrush Color="#FF295564" Opacity="0.3"/> </Grid.Background> </Grid> It is worth noting that the first byte of the color's hex value is the alpha transparency but the Opacity ...


5

Use Environment.NewLine textbox.Multiline = true; textbox.Text += "a" + Environment.NewLine + "b";


5

data[0]>>8 is 0. Remember that your data is defined as byte[] so it has 8bits per single item, so you are effectively cutting ALL bits off the data[0]. You want rather to take the lowest 4 bits from that byte by bitwise AND (00001111 = 0F) and then shift it leftwards as needed. So try this: var _4bit = data[0] >> 4; var _12bit = ((data[0] ...


5

"I may have more than one '*' in a sentence, will String.split work?" Yes, you can achieve what you're trying to do with String.Split() as well: var text = "This is * test *"; var substrings = text.Split('*'); This will give you an array with three strings. "This is " " test " "" The final string is an empty string, which you can ...


4

As you indicated, you can use interfaces to control what is visible. Using explicit interface implementation lets you hide methods in some cases and expose them in others. It also lets you have more than one method with the same signature. In this case, we have a private constructor, so the Person can only be created using one of the static entry points. ...


4

It's json-array, use http://james.newtonking.com/json for this public static T JsonDeserialize<T> (string jsonString) { DataContractJsonSerializer ser = new DataContractJsonSerializer(typeof(T)); MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(jsonString)); T obj = (T)ser.ReadObject(ms); return obj; }


4

You cannot do that with ServiceController.ExecuteCommand. It is one way only and its purpose is not that anyway. You could do it by hosting a web service in the windows service (WCF self hosted, WebApi OWIN self hosted) or with remoting. All the web service needs to expose is a method that returns not the datatable but as list of objects. So you need to ...


4

Commands need to be executed public string SendUserData(string Name, string Password, string Email) { using(SqlCeConnection conn = new SqlCeConnection(".....")) using(SqlCeCommand cmd = new SqlCeCommand(@"INSERT INTO User (Username, Password, Email) VALUES (@name, @pass, @email)" , conn ); { ...


4

It's hard to tell based on what we know but I think I can guess a bit. Anyway if I'm right you will walk your tree in some way so my suggestion would be to remember some kind of path information while you walk your tree (should be trivial - it's just another argument to your walker) - there you can easily store things like the last ChildFinally That ...


4

The problem is Get is a virtual method in that it implements IUser.Get and so is called using execution-time dispatch - I suspect, anyway. (You haven't given us a complete program, so I've had to guess.) If you actually want "methods that can be overridden" you also need to check MethodBase.IsFinal. So just change your loop to: foreach (MethodInfo method ...


4

Wordwrap it from Tools > Options...>Text Editor>. If for all languages go to All Languages or for a particular one to that specific language. Shortcut -> Ctrl + E + W OR You can do Edit > Advanced > WordWrap


4

Why do you create an empty row first, then loop the table again to fill them? I would use a simple foreach: var table_list = new DataTable(); table_list.Columns.Add(); foreach(string[] fields in lists) { DataRow newRow = table_list.Rows.Add(); newRow.SetField(0, string.Join("", fields)); } Why do you put all into one field?


4

You could try this one: // Initially, we have to parse the weekBeginDate string to create a DateTime object // and then we add six days to this DateTime object. DateTime dt = DateTime.Parse(WeekBeginDate).AddDays(6); // Then we assign the string representation of the DateTime object we have created before. Chart1.Titles[0].Text = dt.ToString() ;


4

No. The ternary operator (?:) must be, as a whole, an expression -- that is, something that can be assigned to something.


4

Let's say you could do that. Why? What is the motivation? Fewer lines? not enough to make a difference. Performance? None, the compiler will handle things for you. Clarity? If/else is clearer and more easily understood by the majority of developers. I am sure, if you worked hard enough, you could find a way to handle this (most likely a kludge), but I ...



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