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563

There are some good answers here. I would add to them the following points. What is the correct C# way of representing a data structure, which, "logically" (that is to say, "to the human mind") is just a list of things with a few bells and whistles? Ask any ten non-computer-programmer people who are familiar with the existence of football to fill in ...


290

Dictionary, Index member and event initializers Dictionary, indexer and event initializers are an extension of the collection and object initializer scenarios: o = new Foo { A = 123 }; // object -- C# 3 c = new List<int> { 123 }; // collection -- C# 3 d = new Dictionary<int, int> { [1] = 2 }; // dictionary j = new JSObject { $x = y }; // ...


263

I often heard that people prefer C++ to C# mainly in the performance critical code,because the GC might turn up on critical path, causing the performance penalty. I have heard that in some circles but never respectable circles. For example, I consulted for a company in London who were selling stock exchange software that had been written in 1,000,000 ...


246

Short answer: Equality is complicated. Detailed answer: Primitives types override the base object.Equals(object) and return true if the boxed object is of the same type and value. (Note that it will also work for nullable types; non-null nullable types always box to an instance of the underlying type.) Since newAge is a short, its Equals(object) method ...


193

Is there a clearer definition of a "zombie thread" than what I've explained here? Seems like a pretty good explanation to me - a thread that has terminated (and can therefore no longer release any resources), but whose resources (e.g. handles) are still around and (potentially) causing problems. Can zombie threads occur on .NET? (Why/Why not?) If ...


181

Both person and person2 are references, to the same object. But these are different references. So when you are running person2 = null; you are changing only reference person2, leaving reference person and the corresponding object unchanged. I guess the best way to explain this is with a simplified illustration. Here is how the situation looked like ...


166

UPDATE: I wrote a blog post that discusses this topic in more depth. http://www.codeducky.org/properties-fields-and-methods-oh-my/ Generally they will return the same result. However, there are a few cases where you will experience noticeable differences when MyName is a property because the MyName getter will be executed twice in the first example and ...


159

Math.Pow works on double-precision floating-point numbers; thus, you shouldn't expect more than the first 15–17 digits of the result to be accurate: All floating-point numbers also have a limited number of significant digits, which also determines how accurately a floating-point value approximates a real number. A Double value has up to 15 decimal digits ...


154

I found the bug. .NET does the following in clr\src\vm\comnumber.cpp: DoubleToNumber(value, DOUBLE_PRECISION, &number); if (number.scale == (int) SCALE_NAN) { gc.refRetVal = gc.numfmt->sNaN; goto lExit; } if (number.scale == SCALE_INF) { gc.refRetVal = (number.sign? gc.numfmt->sNegativeInfinity: gc.numfmt->sPositiveInfinity); ...


153

No. The compiler will generate a separate finally block for each variable. The spec (§8.13) says: When a resource-acquisition takes the form of a local-variable-declaration, it is possible to acquire multiple resources of a given type. A using statement of the form using (ResourceType r1 = e1, r2 = e2, ..., rN = eN) statement is precisely ...


151

The reason the calls behave different is they bind to very different methods. The == case will bind to the static reference equality operator. There are 2 independent boxed int values created hence they are not the same reference. In the second case you bind to the instance method Object.Equals. This is a virtual method which will filter down to ...


146

finally blocks run whether an exception is thrown or not. If an exception is thrown, what the heck would continue do? You cannot continue execution of the loop, because an uncaught exception will transfer control to another function. Even if no exception is thrown, finally will run when other control transfer statements inside the try/catch block run, like ...


146

Because it is really different symbols even they look the same, first is the actual letter and has char code = 956 (0x3BC) and the second is the micro sign and has 181 (0xB5). References: Unicode Character 'GREEK SMALL LETTER MU' (U+03BC) Unicode Character 'MICRO SIGN' (U+00B5) So if you want to compare them and you need them to be equal, you need to ...


141

Lastly, some suggest wrapping the List in something: That is the correct way. "Needlessly wordy" is a bad way to look at this. It has an explicit meaning when you write my_team.Players.Count. You want to count the players. my_team.Count ..means nothing. Count what? Your design is broken when you want to inherit from List. Your team isn't a list.. ...


141

You are seeding the Random instance always with the same seed 1000 here: Random rnd = new Random(1000); this will not do that since the current time is used as seed: Random rnd = new Random(); Have a look at the constructor which takes an int. Providing an identical seed value to different Random objects causes each instance to produce identical ...


136

Because new Byte() creates value type, which are compared by value (by default it will return byte with value 0). And new Byte[0] creates array, which is a reference type and compared by reference (and these two instances of array will have different references). See Value Types and Reference Types article for details.


131

No, but it's based on Phi (the "golden ratio"). 161803398 = 1.61803398 * 10^8 ≈ φ * 10^8 More about the golden ratio here. And a really good read for the casual mathematician here. And I found a research paper on random number generators that agrees with this assertion. (See page 53.)


130

The problem could be that the Backdoor.MSIL.PGen Trojan is typically called 'hello.exe'. The name of your executable is presumably 'hello.exe' or 'helloworld.exe'. Just rename your project or change the output executable to something not containing 'hello', and it should stop detecting it. This answer is somewhat speculative, but given the name of your ...


129

Select iterates once over the entire set and, for each item, performs a conditional branch (checking for validity) and a + operation. Where+Select creates an iterator that skips invalid elements (doesn't yield them), performing a + only on the valid items. So, the cost for a Select is: t(s) = n * ( cost(check valid) + cost(+) ) And for Where+Select: ...


123

When you write 1 << n You shift the bit combination 000000001 for n times left and thus put n into the exponent of 2: 2^n So 1 << 10 Really is 1024 For a list of say 5 items your for will cycle 32 times.


117

If the application is a Win32 GUI application, it will just run and command prompt won't wait for it to exit. If the application is a console application, it will run in the command prompt and you'll need to wait for it to finish to get the command prompt back. EDIT: OK. It seems you need technical explanation. If you want to emulate the same feature in ...


112

I think usage of static readonly modifiers fits your needs: public static class Consts { public static readonly string a = "a"; public static readonly string b = "b"; public static readonly string c = "c"; } Constants are hard-coded on the call-site, so that is your problem. Static readonly variable can be modified only in variable declaration ...


112

This code will work, but isn't that pretty. It first divides all three values (it floors the values, so you 'lose' the remainder), and then divides the remainder: long n = x / 3 + y / 3 + z / 3 + ( x % 3 + y % 3 + z % 3 ) / 3 Note that the above sample does not always work properly when ...


111

When I try to do that I get a constant value compile-time error. You'd actually be okay if you used the L suffix to force it to be a long literal - but it's still not ideal to have to specify them all manually. (It's not "obviously correct" when reading the code.) You can't use Math.Pow as the expression has to be a compile-time constant - but you can ...


108

In many cases, you can normalize both of the Unicode characters to a certain normalization form before comparing them, and they should be able to match. Of course, which normalization form you need to use depends on the characters themselves; just because they look alike doesn't necessarily mean they represent the same character. You also need to consider if ...


106

I recently faced a similar situation when suddenly my IISExpress stopped rite after I stopped debugging. This happened after I turned on "Enable Edit and Continue". So if you disable this you will see that IISExpress stays running even after debugging is stopped.


102

It seems to me that this is simply a bug. Your expectations are entirely reasonable. I've reproduced it using .NET 4.5.1 (x64), running the following console app which uses my DoubleConverter class.DoubleConverter.ToExactString shows the exact value represented by a double: using System; class Test { static void Main() { double d1 = ...


100

As per Richter in the second edition of CLR via C# (yes I need to update): Page 478 For (The CLR is shutting down) each Finalize method is given approximately two seconds to return. If a Finalize method doesn't return within two seconds, the CLR just kills the process - no more Finalize methods are called. Also, if it takes more then 40 seconds to call ...


99

In general you are correct that the first overload can suffice for the other overloads. This is not strictly true though because the params keyword can't be used for indirect cases like method group binding. For example delegate void E(string format, object o1); E e = Console.WriteLine; The params overload won't satisfy this case, it will only work when ...


95

Yes, the compiler generates a pair of get and set methods for a property, plus a private backing field for an auto-implemented property. public int Age {get; set;} becomes the equivalent of: private int <Age>k__BackingField; public int get_Age() { return <Age>k__BackingField; } public void set_Age(int age) { ...



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