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18

As of Visual Studio 11 and CUDA 4.1, restrict(amp) functions are more restrictive than CUDA's analogous __device__ functions. Most noticeably, AMP is more restrictive about how pointers can be used. This is a natural consequence of AMP's DirectX11 computational substrate, which disallows pointers in HLSL (graphics shader) code. By constrast, CUDA's ...


18

C++ AMP is a library (and as part of it a key language extension was also introduced). Since C++ AMP is an open specification, it can be implemented on any other low level languages. Microsoft’s implementation builds on DirectCompute (and hence on HLSL), but that is completely hidden from you when you are using C++ AMP (which is why C++ AMP can be an open ...


14

The only mention of restrict in the C++11 FDIS is on §17.2 [library.c]: The descriptions of many library functions rely on the C standard library for the signatures and semantics of those functions. In all such cases, any use of the restrict qualifier shall be omitted. So restrict is not in C++11.


13

In terms of concurrency, a memory model specifies the constraints on data accesses, and the conditions under which data written by one thread/core/processor becomes visible to another. The terms weak and strong are somewhat ambiguous, but the basic premise is that a strong memory model places a lot of constraints on the hardware to ensure that writes by one ...


12

One argument is that C needs restrict more than C++, because many operations are done with pointers to primitive types and therefore C code has more aliasing problems than C++. The aliasing rules say that pointers to different types cannot alias, so if the parameters to a function are of different class types they just cannot overlap. In C++ we also have ...


10

Indeed C++ AMP has a CPU fallback (multi-core plus SSE) implementation called WARP (aka "Microsoft Basic Render Driver"): http://www.danielmoth.com/Blog/Running-C-AMP-Kernels-On-The-CPU.aspx


10

Use synchronize() when you want to access the data without going through the array_view interface. If all of your access to the data uses array_view operators and functions, you don't need to use synchronize(). As Daniel mentioned, the destructor of an array_view forces a synchronize as well, and it's better to call synchronize() in that case so you can get ...


10

If the standard becomes a true ISO standard then it's likely in the future but virtually anything licensed under the MS-PL is always addressed with caution by the FSF (large parts of Mono for instance). Richard Stallman is very against using Microsoft open code and he still has many ties, although mostly political, to GCC so I doubt that the current spec of ...


10

C++ AMP requires not only the amp.h header file, but a new compiler (in order to understand the restrict keyword, for example). The Developer Preview of VS 11 (either the one you can download onto a Windows 7 machine or the one that comes with the Developer Preview image of Windows 8) has the compiler you need. Your existing copy of VS 2010 (or whatever) ...


10

http://herbsutter.com/2012/05/03/reader-qa-what-about-vc-and-c99/ Not only the VC++ team, but also the ISO C++ standards committee, considered adding restrict to VC++ and ISO C++, respectively. Although it was specifically suggested for ISO C++11, it was rejected, in part because it’s not always obvious how it extends to C++ code because C++ is a larger ...


8

The article over at Ars says: > AMP has been developed by Microsoft with input from AMD and NVIDIA. Microsoft's implementation allows AMP programs to use both the main CPU and Direct3D video cards (via the company's DirectCompute API), though the specification should also permit OpenGL/OpenCL-based implementations. Microsoft encourages other ...


7

In general, you should make sure that data used on different cpus are not shared (easy) and are not on the same cache line (false sharing, see for example here: False Sharing is No Fun). Data used by the same cpu should be close together to benefit from caches.


7

It seems like your overarching question is WHY moving things to the GPU doesn't always get you a benefit. The answer is copy time. Imagine a calculation that takes a time proprotional to n squared. Copying takes a time proportional to n. You might need quite a large n before spending the time to copy to and from the GPU is outweighed by the time saved doing ...


7

An accelerator represents a device which can execute C++ AMP code. You are right, in majority of cases it will be a GPU, but even in Visual Studio 2012 there are other types of accelerators available. An example of such accelerator would be a Windows Advanced Rasterization Platform (WARP) device, it is a CPU fallback that takes advantage of multi-core and ...


7

Transferring data back and forth between GPU and CPU takes time. You are most likely measuring your PCI Express bus bandwidth here. Squaring 1M of floats is piece of cake for a GPU. It's also not a good idea to use the Stopwach class to measure performance for AMP because GPU calls can happen asynchronously. In your case it is ok, but if you measure the ...


7

It is very likely that your computation exceeds permitted quantum time (default 2 seconds). After that time the operating systems comes in and restarts the GPU forcefully, this is called Timeout Detection and Recovery (TDR). The software adapter (reference device) does not have the TDR enabled, that is why the computation can exceed permitted quantum time. ...


6

The two terms aren't clearly defined, and it's not a black/white thing. Memory models can be extremely weak, extremely strong, or anywhere in between. It basically refers to the guarantees offered about concurrent memory accesses. Naively, you would expect a write made on one thread, to be immediately visible to all other threads. And you would expect ...


6

Looks like it's pretty simple: concurrency::get_accelerators(); Daniel Moth comments: in the VS 11 Developer Preview bits, you simply call concurrency::get_accelerators();. We are working to make that more discoverable for the Beta, whenever that is. Here's my code: #include <iostream> #include "stdafx.h" #include "amp.h" using namespace std; ...


6

Current GPUs are notoriously depending about memory layout. Without more details about your application here are some things I would suggest you explore: Unit-stride access is very important so GPUs prefer “structs of arrays” to “arrays of structures”. As you did moving field “blocked” into vector “obstacle”, it should be advantageous to convert all of the ...


6

C++ AMP allows you to execute your code on the GPUs. Whether or not you would get performance depends on how well your computation would take advantage of the hardware. You would have much more cores on your disposal, but you need to transfer your data over PCIe, so your computation needs to be substantial to pay off the initial cost of data movement. Data ...


5

Function synchronize() is probably taking so long because it is waiting for the actual kernel to complete its work. From parallel_for_each from amp.h: Please note that the parallel_for_each executes as if synchronous to the calling code, but in reality, it is asynchronous. I.e. once the parallel_for_each call is made and the kernel has been passed to ...


5

Don't think it's in C++1x (unfortunately time has long run out for 0x...!) but at least msvc and g++ support it through __restrict and __restrict__ extensions. (I don't use gcc much, I think that's the correct extension). To work properly with C++ I feel that we would also need restricted references, not just pointers, maybe along the lines of my question ...


5

The result of a lambda expression is a closure object, and the type of the closure object is unknowable. You can only use auto to declare a variable of its exact type. However, you can convert a closure object into a suitable instance of an std::function, and if the lambda is non-capturing, you can even convert it to a function pointer. However, this ...


5

You can work with chars in C++ AMP as per this blog post: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/nativeconcurrency/archive/2012/01/17/c-amp-it-s-got-character-but-no-char.aspx IMO warp divergence is no different in string processing as it would be in other algorithms, so I wouldn't pre-worry about that aspect of things. First get it right, then get it fast, then tune it ...


5

The message means that the compiler can't tell if you want std::extent or concurrency::extent. There are three ways to fix this: remove the #include that brought in std::extent - this is unlikely to be a good solution, since you presumably need something from that header call concurrency::extent by its full name whenever you use it - awkward, but will work ...


5

You could have a look at Boost Fusion's algorithms. All that's required is to adapt your type as a Fusion Sequence. Simple sample: Live On Coliru #include <boost/array.hpp> #include <boost/fusion/adapted.hpp> #include <boost/fusion/algorithm.hpp> #include <boost/fusion/include/io.hpp> #include <iostream> int main() { ...


4

Yes, you are right - the difference between Weak and Strong memory models is a difference in what optimizations are available (order of reads/write and related fences). You can specify a memory model by starting with a sequentially consistent model (the most restrictive, or strongest model), and then specify how reads and writes from a single thread can ...


4

my_array_view_instance.synchronize is not required for the simple examples I showed because the destructor calls synchronize. Having said that, I am not following best practice (sorry), which is to explicitly call synchronize. The reason is that if any exceptions are thrown at that point, you would not observe them if you left them up to the destructor, so ...


4

Is your application explicitly providing an accelerator/accelerator_view for the parallel_for_each? If so you need to ensure that when debugging you use the REF accelerator unless your GPU driver supports debugging. accelerator defaultAcc (accelerator::default_accelerator); accelerator_view defaultView = defaultAcc.default_view; #ifndef _DEBUG ...


4

If you are someone working on C++ and you have questions like this one or with dealing projecting data to different dimensions stop and read this article: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/nativeconcurrency/archive/2012/02/17/projections-in-c-amp.aspx It deals with this exact problem in a beautiful way. Here is what my parallel_for loop looks like now: ...



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