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4

By default, the members of a class are private. You need to declare them to be public. public ref class MyClass { public: String^ string1; String^ string2; String^ string3; long exampleNumber; MyEnum choosenValue; MySubClass credentials; unsigned int otherNumber; }; If the structures you are wrapping are pure data containers, ...


3

Use this: IEnumerable<String^>^ abc = myObject.Myfun(); You need to use the System::String^ as your type, not C++'s std::string. If you need to work with std::string to pass to other C++ code, you need to use std::string myCPPstring = marshal_as<std::string>(myDotNetString);


2

Specifying /ENTRY on a managed assembly is a really bad idea, because now all the .NET Framework support code in the C++ runtime library won't be executed. Initializers of global C++ objects won't get a chance to run either. And you may get memory leaks on worker threads, because the C++ runtime library is smart enough to perform thread-local ...


2

Yes you can. let the method definition in header, for example the constructor and destructor : Form1(void); ~Form1(); and create a .cpp file, or just edit an existing : include "formName.h" (dont forgot namespace), next : Form1::Form1(void) { // ... } Form1::~Form1() { // ... } For events (Click, Load, etc) load the event, keep definition of ...


1

When I tried this, it did report a line number to me. Can you show an example where it doesn't? My test code: int main(array<System::String ^> ^args) { int i = 7; std::string foo = marshal_as<std::string>(i); } Build output: ------ Build started: Project: QuickieCppCLI, Configuration: Debug x64 ------ QuickieCppCLI.cpp C:\Program ...


1

In C# you use System.IntPtr for win32 handles, so you should use System::IntPtr in C++ which can be cast into HWND safely look at this for example code: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/yvesdolc/archive/2007/09/10/c-cli-intptr-to-an-hwnd.aspx


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Been a long time since I've touched C++/CLI, but I think it will be: IEnumerable<String^> ^abc = myObject.Myfun();


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Create a class as seen in the tutorials and then let it have a static function. You cannot have free functions in C#. The function you created in C++ is just that... a C++ function without any CLI involved.


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best way will be to use StringToHGlobalAnsi wich copies the contents of a managed String into unmanaged memory. Here the msdn link : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-en/library/system.runtime.interopservices.marshal.stringtohglobalansi(v=vs.110).aspx. Alsom, you have .Net method String::Concat for concatenate String objects.


1

What you're trying to do here is called variable capture. In C#, you would do this by defining an inline delegate, which would do the variable capture for you: Action<int, string> delegateWithParams = ... Action delegateWithoutParams1 = delegate { delegateWithParams(7, "foo"); }; // or if you like lambda syntax: Action delegateWithoutParams2 = () ...


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C++ has several mechanisms for this, boost::bind became std::bind, and now we have lambdas. They don't work with managed types though. Hopefully a future version of the C++/CLI compiler will add lambda functionality, until then your approach with a helper object is pretty much it (but you can genericize it to reduce code duplication. Both storing the ...



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