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1

I don't have enough reputation to add a comment to ask this question, so I apologize for posting this as an answer if that seems inappropriate. Could the problem be that your compiler defines wchar_t to be 8 bits? I'm basing that is possible on this answer: Should I use wchar_t when using UTF-8? To answer your question (in the comments) about building a ...


0

Well, you can, use GCHandle::Alloc() again, get the raw pointer with GCHandle::ToIntPtr() and recover the object reference again in the callback with GCHandle::FromIntPtr(). But this just isn't necessary. The power of a delegate over a function pointer is that it also captures your object reference. The this argument in your CallbackDelegate constructor ...


2

What you need is to first convert IEnumerable to a managed array, then convert the managed array to a native one. As ToArray is an extension method, in C++/CLI, you can call it as a static function: array<unsigned char>^ a = Enumerable::ToArray<unsigned char>(PartOne); As how to copy data from managed array to native array, you can find how ...


2

Not sure why Intellisense isn't working but you should have some public methods available (GetEnumerator and methods inherited from object). You won't see extension methods but you should be able to call them as static methods from the Enumerable class: int partOneCount = Enumerable::Count(packet -> PartOne); int partTwoCount = Enumerable::Count(packet ...


0

My PowerShell ISE wasn't running as an Administrator. This seemed to be the problem for me.


0

Simply create DateTime object like Datetime test = DateTime::Now; Then format it like this String^ timestamp = test.ToString ("yyyy-MM-dd H:m:s"); This format is compatible with MySQL.


1

I wouldn't use LINQ itself at all. I'd just use an XML API - probably LINQ to XML. Don't be fooled - the "LINQ" in the term really just means it's an API which is designed to work really well with LINQ to Objects. You don't need any language integration to use it though. Here's a really simple example in C#: using System; using System.Xml.Linq; public ...


0

The absolute best way I have found to do this is create a c++/cli bridge that connects the c# code to your native C++. I would not recommend using COM objects to solve your problem, and you won't need to touch IJW. You can do this with 3 different projects. First Project: C# library Second Project: C++/CLI bridge (this wraps the C# library) Third Project: ...


1

Yes, that's a bug. It's enforcing something which is not implied by the .NET type system, and the enforcement is ineffective. But don't use Array::SetValue, which involves boxing and is not type safe. You can just do: auto array = m_array; // another handle to same array array[0] = 5;


0

struct s shall be defined outside the function. Also it is not clear why it is present in the function definition as a parameter type specifier when no object of this type is used within the function body.


1

You can use the string range constructor, and pin the managed array. pin_ptr<unsigned char> p = &aSource[0]; unsigned char *unmanagedP = p; std::string str(unmanagedP , unmanagedP + aSource->GetLength(0)); or the sequence constructor: std::string str(unmanagedP , aSource->GetLength(0));


1

Check in void ConvertAndProcess() if the frame contains something or not. It seems like that the frame is empty and therefore there is nothing to convert from BGR to GRAY. you can do the following: if(!frame.empty()) cvtColor(frame, gray, CV_BGR2GRAY); else { cout<<"\nFrame is empty."; return; }


1

careful ! frame = cv::Mat(height, width, CV_8UC3, imgData); this is a 'borrowed' pointer. when imgData leaves scope (at the end of the function), frame.data is invalid. that means, that you can't expect frame to be valid in ConvertAndProcess() if you constructed it this way. you could clone() it, to achieve a 'deep copy': frame = cv::Mat(height, ...


0

If you keep using pointers for your unmanaged objects (which you might want to reconsiderate), you should be able to call the unmanaged function like this: int result = unmanagedClassInstance->getResponse(*unRequest, *unResponse); But unless strictly necessary, I'd suggest you do this instead: RequestObject unRequest; // Here I'm taking things from a ...


0

whois.iana.org is root whois server, it returns whois server of zone that you specified, e.g. for .com, .net, .us, .ca etc; for each of this zone whois server is different and the trick is that reply text/format about domain info is not the same everywhere. See response format for google.us and google.ca as example: ...


0

I resolved with 'override' keyword in following way. Base class ref class DataBackUp { public: virtual void StartBackUp(void) = 0; }; Derived class ref class FlatBackup : public DataBackUp { public: void StartBackUp(void) override { } };


1

You need to create callback object explicitly and assign it to corresponding property. using namespace System; using namespace System::Net; using namespace System::Net::Security; using namespace System::Security::Cryptography::X509Certificates; static bool ValidateServerCertificate( Object^ sender, X509Certificate^ certificate, ...


0

C++/CLI in VS 2010 doesn't support lambdas, so you'll have to write your delegate as a normal function: using namespace System::Net; using namespace System::Net::Security; using namespace System::Security::Cryptography::X509Certificates; bool returnTrueCallback( Object^ sender, X509Certificate^ certificate, X509Chain^ chain, SslPolicyErrors ...


1

Since you're using C++ /CLI, the resulting image is a .NET image. All you need to do is import the namespace in your C# file, with appropriate references in the C# project. I tried this C# code: using Callee; namespace Caller { class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { Byte[] calcs = new Byte[10]; ...


0

In order to be correctly merged in, program.netmodule should be indicated in linker two times, in input list and as the parameter in ASSEMBLYMODULE option. So the whole command line will will be as follows: link /LTCG /CLRIMAGETYPE:IJW /ENTRY:MixedLanguageDemo.Program.Main /SUBSYSTEM:WINDOWS /ASSEMBLYMODULE:program.netmodule /OUT:MixedLanguageDemo.exe ...


0

The answer to the question is: "The C++ IDE does not support multi-targeting" Because I didn't understand this answer when I'd seen it in other posts, I'm going to try and clarify for the benefit of other poor souls who stumble upon this "feature". What this means is that my VS 2010 cannot (correctly) target .net 2.0 when I'm doing a C++ project. I had ...


1

You are most likely missing a dependent DLL. If the third tool is compiled into DLL then make sure that DLL is in the same folder as your other binaries. If this doesn't solve the problem then you can try to find the missing dll using Dependency Walker.


3

public ref class Helper abstract sealed { public: static System::Nullable<int> GetCodes(System::String^ input) { /* impl logic */ } };


7

This is C++/CLI. The ^ is declaring a managed pointer (as opposed to a raw pointer using *). The BinaryWriter object is being allocated with gcnew instead of new, so it will be garbage-collected when it is not being used anymore. The ^% is a tracking reference. It is the equivalent of the C# ref keyword. You can read the documentation to learn more about ...


2

MSDN provides some detail on how to marshal data. They also provide some standard implementation for msclr::marshal_as w.r.t. std::string. The cli::array is a little more complex, the key for the general case here is to pin the array first (so that we don't have it moving behind our backs). In the case of the String^ conversion, the marshal_as will pin the ...


1

(System::Object^ sender, System::EventArgs^ e) That is a language called C++/CLI (Common Language Infrastructure). It is an adaptation of C++ which uses the CLR directly. It's not C++. You can create modules which can be consumed natively by any other CLR language, but the code (at minimum, the ref classes) is compiled to MSIL, not native machine ...


0

The simplest way as follows, try this code segment : hide: LVW.Columns.Item(0).Width = 0 show again: LVW.Columns.Item(0).AutoResize(ColumnHeaderAutoResizeStyle.ColumnContent) may this help someone.


1

The solution I found was to use the MouseDown event instead of the Click event. This ignored what was being clicked on in the panel and simply looked at wether the mouse was within the panel.


0

You can use Linq to Xml which supports changing the name of an XElement: XDocument doc = XDocument.Parse("<foo><bar /></foo>"); doc.Root.Name = "changed";//now it will look like <changed><bar /></changed>


1

A pin_ptr<> automatically unpins, RAII-style, when code execution leaves the block that it is declared it. So it will be pinned for the entire body of the Init() method in your code. So your 2 bullet does not apply. It is notable that the code is in not infact correct. It works, but by accident. Marshal.GetFunctionPointerForDelegate() invokes the ...


0

'Identifier not found' is a compiler error (not linker error) which implies the header file which specifies upgStop() hasn't been #included in the file from which the function is being called. Do you have a header file which contains the declaration/prototype of ugpStop()? Once this is resolved, you may have linker errors isntead - as you either need to ...


3

Creating a BitmapImage from an URI is already performed asynchronously by WPF, so there is no need to start another thread. Just do it this way: using namespace System; using namespace System::Windows::Controls; using namespace System::Windows::Media::Imaging; public ref class ExtendedImage : public Image { public: void SetImageFromUrl(System::String^ ...


3

System::Threading::Thread ^ producerThread = gcnew System::Threading::Thread(&Producer::ThreadRun); The Thread class constructor requires a delegate object. You are used to the C# language syntax sugar that automagically converts a method to a delegate. But that sugar doesn't exist in C++/CLI, you have to create the delegate object yourself. ...


9

Sure, it is an extension to C++03 and can compile any compliant C++03 program that doesn't conflict with the added keywords. The only thing it doesn't support are some of the Microsoft extensions to C++, the kind that are fundamentally incompatible with managed code execution like __fastcall and __try. MC++ was their first attempt at it, kept compatible by ...


3

CLI is a set of extensions for standard C++. CLI has full support of standard C++ and adds something more. So every C++ program will compile with enabled CLI, except you are using a CLI reserved word and this is the weakness of the extension, because it does not respect the double underscore rule for extensions (such reserved words has to begin with __). ...


0

My mistake...I forgot to mark the BC2D arguments as handles. Fix: array<double, 2>^ SolvePressure( double mu, double omega, cli::array<double, 2>^ ax, cli::array<double, 2>^ ay, cli::array<double, 2>^ bx, cli::array<double, 2>^ by, cli::array<double, 2>^ cx, cli::array<double, 2>^ cy, ...


0

It turns out I had accidentally written #include "stdafx.h" in my C++/CLI .cpp file. Power of habit, I guess. Removing the include fixes the problem.


-1

The C++/C# interoperability can be achieved in two ways: through Win32 DLLs or through COM components. If you plan to use the Win32 approach you're gonna have to provide all the metadata in terms of CLR types, then the managed compiler will compile the metadata into the assembly and the JIT compiler will build stubs that performs the C#/Win32 conversion. ...


2

In order to create a delegate instance in C++/CLI, you need to construct it explicitly, and specify the object that it will be called on separately from the class & method to be called. gcnew Func<TInput, TOutput>(theObject, &TheClass::MethodToInvoke) Note that the method to be called is specified in the C++ style. Substituting that in to ...


0

Based on the comment discussion with @BenVoigt on @svick's original answer and the new MSDN article on C++/CLI events, I have created a minimal example of how to do this correctly. This code compiles and runs in a Visual Studio 2013 CLR project template targeting .NET 4.5. I haven't tested on other runtimes and targets, but it only uses basic .NET ...


0

Just keep a buffer of data that wasn't a complete message. Whenever new data comes in, stick it on the end of the buffer. Then check for and remove complete messages. There might be extra sticking around in the buffer for the next block received. With respect to your update: serial ports are buffered. As long as you aren't actually closing the serial ...


0

So, more of a proposal than an answer. How about this : namespace MyTech { class Foo // implicitly MyTech::native::Foo { public: Foo() { m_var = 1.0f; } float m_var; }; public ref class Foo // implicitly MyTech::managed::Foo because of ref. { Foo(native::Foo *native) { m_native = ...


0

As @DavidHeffernan suggested, I try do define a delegate : delegate void MyCallback(String^ str); Then I try to use it with MyProject::displayFromDotNet : MyCallback^ function = gcnew MyCallback(*this, MyProject::displayFromDotNet); If successful, I would have provide "function" to the constructor of ComputationProject (instead of IntPtr). But it does ...


-1

I finally find a (ugly) way. My main problem was I could not pass a method pointer to C# because it is not a real function pointer (so I cannot cast it to IntPtr). I decided to create a second class containing a static MyProject object and a static method calling displayIHM on the static object : class StaticMyProject { public : static MyProject ...


0

System::String and String are the same class. Since .Net strings are immutable, you don't need to make another one using gcnew, you can just use userinfo directly. String^ userinfo = DownloadHTMLPage("http://xat.com/web_gear/chat/auser3.php"); // Use userinfo in your code, or... String^ str2 = userinfo; Based on the comments on the other answer, it looks ...


1

userInfo is a pointer, so you should write that line as System::String^ str2 = gcnew System::String(userinfo->c_str());


0

I am not 100% sure but I think the problem in your case could be missing attribute [ProtoContract] on declarations of RequestMessage and ResponseMessage. E.g. on service side: [ProtoContract] public ref class RequestMessage { public: [ProtoMember(1)] Int32 Number1; [ProtoMember(2)] Int32 Number2; }; ...


1

I doubt that there exists such a way - C++\CLI treats managed and native classes as equal citizens of its namespaces. SO 1. You could rename one of your classes class FooNative { public: Foo() { m_var = 1.0f; } float m_var; }; public ref class Foo { Foo(FooNative* native) { m_native = native; } ...


0

From your code snippet. There is no type defined as student - the struct is typdef to stud - this explains why the compiler yells at you it doesn't recognize the student **first argument type in the add_record method declaration. using namespace Exercise1; typedef struct student { char *name; int index; double avg; student ...


0

The problem wasn't with the reference itself. The problem was with the second enum parameter. The implementation of the enum class looked like this: #ifdef _MANAGED public #endif enum class MyEnum : unsigned char { Baz = 0, Qux = 1 }; The #ifdef directive was put there in order to create a native enum when built for native ...



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